Saturday, December 12, 2015

Jacaranda View

I am not sure how these photos will appear in this post, but they certainly illustrate a point in their original form. Back in 2010 I took a photo of blooming jacaranda trees viewable from our balcony. This would have been taken by my second digital camera, which I still have. I am now on to my fourth. The photo is not bad, but it does lack detail and clarity. Btw, there are four jacarandas in the view.


I took this one with the new camera before I fixed its settings. Awful. Why did I wait for so long before addressing the camera problem? It was not hard once I sat down and spent some time fiddling.


With the settings fixed, this is not too bad. It is bit like those spot the ten differences photo puzzles, but I can assure you, there is one jacaranda tree less in the current view compared to 2010.

24 comments:

  1. I think it is interesting to see the change in rooftops too. Perhaps one of your trees has been sacrificed for a new house on a subdivided house block with no garden. That was the trend in Brisbane when I lived there.
    Glad you fixed your darkness problem on your camera.

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    1. Carol, I thought that too but now looking, I don't think so. The tree has just gone with nothing new built.

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  2. Andre interesting architecture no skycscripers

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    1. Gosia, it is a very protected area.

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  3. Jacarandas are beautiful trees. Messy, but beautiful. And this tree hugging lefty is always sad to lose another.

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    1. EC, the rule should be remove a tree and it must be replaced by two trees.

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    2. I like that rule, make it so!

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    3. Not an unreasonable suggestion, is it Jac.

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  4. There is quite a few trees around when you see it from this view.

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    1. CM, so different to some parts of Melbourne where people seem to dislike trees.

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  5. "A tree can absorb as much as 48 pounds of carbon dioxide per year, and can sequester one ton of carbon dioxide by the time it reaches 40 years old. [1]
    One large tree can provide a supply of oxygen for two people. [2]" For these two reasons, we should probably worship trees or treat them really well. They create oxygen for us to breath and absorb and sequester carbon. They are more valuable than gold.

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    1. Strayer, I don't know if you remember but we came across a tree in Canada that began its life in the 11th or 12th century. Isn't that just amazing. We must love our trees and only remove them for very good reasons. PS The stats are impressive.

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  6. Without the purple flowers, I can't spot any Jacaranda trees.

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    1. River, you can't really see them in the middle photo but you should be able to see them in the first and definitely the third.

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  7. aaah so much better now it's fixed. Bravo!
    I love Jacarandas, they've been looking magnifique this year

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    1. Fen, so it is not just me who thinks Jacarandas have been really good this year. I am not sure if that is a good thing or bad, if they were used as weather predictors.

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  8. I can see Jacarandas. Is that one over on the left by that rid brick wall in the second photo?
    It's a good thing you fixed your fairly new camera. I bet you said a few words when the pictures didn't come out right for ages :)

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    1. Margaret, yes, I think you have identified one in the second photo. It did take me some time to realise that the photos were just not good enough.

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  9. A treat for me as Jacarandas are my very favourite trees, especially if you see an avenue of them all blooming in unison. Removing one should be punishable by being hung, drawn and quartered in my opinion. Much better with the lighter photos now you have discovered the nature of the problem.

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    1. Craig, while we have plenty of Jacarandas, I cannot remember them being used as avenue trees, which is a shame. Although I do recall our Grace showing us a Jacaranda festival recently and there may have been avenue plantings of them in her photos.

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    2. Oh yes indeed Andrew. There are many avenues of Jacaranda trees here in Perth.. usually in the older suburbs, such a spectacular sight when in bloom.

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    3. Grace, perhaps it won't only be wildflowers that make WA popular at certain times of the year.

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  10. Adelaide is full of them, although most are losing the flowers now. Rows and rows of purple lined streets.

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    1. Good to hear River. We don't tend to notice them unless they are blooming.

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