Thursday, October 29, 2015

What? Stop mumbling

I used to have a somewhat flat monotone speaking voice. I don't know why. It is not family trait. After hearing myself on tape a few times, I made an effort to be more expressive when I speak. I am not sure if I was really successful. I am sure I improved but to what degree, I am not sure. It is something I am quite conscious about, but then I am quite conscious about myself to rather a great degree.

When I have my work medical, my hearing is tested. The result is always, your hearing is fine. But then comes the qualifier, for your age. Nevertheless, I think my hearing is ok, for my age. R has never had a hearing test and I can tell his hearing is failing. Sometimes after I have repeated myself twice, I raise my voice to an unreasonable level in frustration. Funnily, a friend mentioned R's hearing issues when the friend himself has his own self unrecognised hearing issues. Getting older is great fun.

Years ago, we had a friend who was deaf in one ear and would only properly hear what was said on one side of him. Where he sat at a table for dinner was something that had to be thought about. More recently another newer friend has a similar issue.

The five senses are touch, hearing, taste, smell and sight. Touch might be a really bad one to lose, but for mine, please never let my lose my sight.

So given many of you are of a certain age, do you have your own hearing or the hearing of a loved one issues?

31 comments:

  1. My darling has slight hearing loss in both ears, which ~ according to my delightful ball of goof ~ makes it more difficult to understand my accent. Ppffffftttt!

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    1. Oh, and in response to your question: I'd rather lose my sight than my hearing. Not to be able to hear a loved one's voice? Devastating.

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    2. Jac, yes, I think both would be bad to lose, but I think sight would be worse.

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  2. Andrew my hearing is not fine because I work in school in noisy environment

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    1. Gosia, you must make your students be quiet.

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  3. I often have to repeat what I've said to my husband. I seem to be ok, so far. I do have a problem if people talk too loud, it hurts my ears and head...weird. grandfather was the same.
    Sight, my late dad was legally blind for years, not good at all.

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    1. Margaret, hopefully you have some of your mother's sight genes then.

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  4. I have hearing issues and so does my brother. He now has hearing aids, but I don't yet. I'm putting off getting them because I'm at home a lot now, and without all the usual background noise of shops etc, I can hear the TV just fine. Plus they're expensive.
    I agree with you about not losing sight. All those books and not being able to read them, that would be the worst thing in the world for me.

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    1. River, it is not so bad I think when you live alone.

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  5. My beloved has hearing and/or processing problems. They drive me nuts.

    I do not. But I do have memory problems and they drive me nuts too.

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    1. Hels, what the modern human brain has to now remember compared to a century ago is amazing, so don't be hard on yourself.

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  6. I suspect that my hearing is deteriorating a bit because with slightly increasing frequency I don't hear or mishear things that waiters or other service people say when in a noisy environment. It occurs to me that I may have done this to myself by lawnmowing without earmuffs - that would explain the recent deterioration since I have only been mowing recently on renting a house with a large lawn. If so, silly me.

    My father, 89, for as long as I can remember had no upper-pitch hearing owing to (or so we have always thought) a youthful enthusiasm for shooting. Beyond about two octaves above middle C all he could hear from a piano was the click of the mechanism and the percussion on the string rather than the pitch of the note.

    About 20 years ago he was told nothing could be done about that.

    In the past 5 or 10 years he has become more deaf. Ironically (to me) earlier this year, about 6 months after my stepmother died, he decided to go and see about getting a hearing aid. He was in and out in a day to the relevant medical specialist and the hearing-aid vendors who were oh-so-conveniently located at the same place. I say ironically because (1) one might have thought there was more point whilst my stepmother was still alive so that he could hear her better and (2) whilst she was alive he would have been eligible for a free hearing aid whereas her death has meant that, as a single person on almost the same income he no longer qualifies.

    He emerged with a hearing aid which cost him $6.5K Snip! He now says it doesn't make any difference, even though he has been back once to see if an adjustment could work any improvement. I have a strong feeling that he has been taken advantage of - it's a big purchase to make on the one day and i don't feel he has quite the presence of mind he once had to deal with a medical/sales pitch in that sort of time frame.

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    1. Marcellous, that is a high price, I think, especially if it doesn't work. Places like that do take advantage. I think you need to do more mowing that just own lawn to suffer hearing loss from a lawn mower.

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    2. $6.5k?!! My brother has aids in each ear and they are fairly new in style and function, state of the art almost, they cost him $2k.

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    3. River, that is near to what I thought they cost.

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  7. My partner has hearing issues. Mind you, I suspect some of it is deliberate. However, his father became very deaf, and the early signs are there.
    My hearing is good, but the dread disease means that I intermittently (so far temporarily) lose my sight. And sensation is reduced and/or compromised as well.

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    1. EC, that would be quite devastating for you, especially if it is going to become worse. We hope not.

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  8. I think hearing issues will become very common with our younger generation having earphones in their ears 24x7. They say that when you lose one sense the others become heightened, so perhaps that is the upside of a bad situation. I agree with not having a good sense of what our voice sounds like. I recently recorded some question and answers with a student and I was horrified how ordinary I sounded ~ like a real FNQ yokel from Upper Kumbuckta West.

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    1. Carol, I agree. No good can come from ear buds in ears at high volume. I'm sure you don't sound like you think you do.

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  9. I thought all men had 'selective' hearing Andrew what what :)

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    1. Grace, possibly true or maybe they just don't understand what is being said when couched in emotional speaking.

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  10. Nathan definitely has hearing issues (not just selective)...I think he must have damage his hearing from years of listening to music too loudly on his headphones.

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    1. Ad Rad, if that is the case there is going to be a lot of deaf people around in the future. None of the devices I listen to with ear phones will turn up loud enough to damage hearing. I don't know where kids get machines that can play music so loudly.

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  11. a lot of the headphones available have bass boosters or other sound enhancers. When I got my first walkman in 1987 I think it was, maybe 86, the sound was easily heard over the factory machines, even without turning it to full volume. Eventually I bought a better quality one and the sound was much better in tone and I only had to turn the dial to 3 or 4 to hear it clearly while at work, the setting went up to number 10. Add bass booster headphones to that and imagine the damage being done to young ears.

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    1. River, my experience of head phones or ear buds is limited to cheap ones that cost under $10. I have noticed of late that you don't hear the leakage from earphones on public transport that you used to. You or I should write a brief history of things we stuck in our ears to hear sounds.

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  12. I am totally deaf in my right ear. Not an age issue but a consequence of nerve damage caused by some bacteria or the like in swimming pool water during a period when I tried swimming exercise about fifteen years ago.

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    1. Victor, take a bow. You are the newer friend. I did not realise you were totally deaf in one ear. I guess you develop ways to cope.

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  13. He might have built up wax in the inner ear and his doctor could flush that out quite easily. My mother has just had that done, good results in one ear, not quite as good in the other.

    I heard a recording of myself once and I sounded exactly like my mother, total shock. With the answering machine I used to wait until I had a head cold to change the message. I sounded very sexy.

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    1. Jah Teh, he is pretty self aware, as you know, so I doubt it is that. His father was quite deaf in his older years.

      You had a nice husky voice? Ever thought of doing telephone work to supplement your income. It is all some blokes want.

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  14. Really, all they want is a fat old tart with a head cold to whisper at them.

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