Sunday, October 25, 2015

Sunday Selections

Joining River and others in Sunday Selections with some random photos.

It seemed works had been underway for a very long time in Fitzroy Gardens, East Melbourne. The completed project has been revealed.

Some landscaping and plantings with seating.


A soak which may well flow after rain, should we ever see any again. I will reserve judgement until the plants grow, but I like the soak.


Captain Cook's cottage, which I seem to recall was actually his parents' cottage and it was shipped out from England. While Cook wasn't the first white person to visit Australia, he is credited with discovering it.


I don't know what the significance of this tree stump is, but it must be important.


A host of golden daffodils.


Quite lovely.


Avenues of elms.



Boarded up old mansion. I think tradies were busy inside.


A modest house where Highriser would be quite content to reside. Does it have a lift? I am used to lifts.


Oh dear, what happened to last house in this terrace. Its verandah has been removed along with much of the decorative embellishments.


For some reason this part has been exposed. And what is that iron thingie up on the wall.


Some kind of cable support? There were never trams nearby that have overhead wires needing support.


Some of the City Square was sold off and used for commercial development. The idea of selling off part a city square would puzzle many Europeans. This is the Westin Hotel built on former City Square land, with its own flag flying, the Australian flag (hope it is not New Zealand), the Union Jack and what??? Flag of Finland as well as I can make out and I can't find a connection between the Westin and Finland.



Possibly my favourite Melbourne building, the Manchester Unity Building, I think is owned by an Indian/Australian doctor. Rather Manhattan, don't you think.



To conclude, this old man one man band was not really old at all. He was just wearing some really bad clothing.





38 comments:

  1. Love that soak. And hope it does fill.
    The Manchester Unity Building is intriguing.
    I love the curved windows in the house in which you could force yourself to live...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. EC, it looks like a bay window. Maybe a nice place to sit and read.

      Delete
  2. Andrew I have seen the monument of captain Cook in England. I love yellow daffodils. Spring is coming to your country

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Gosia, the photos are old. Spring has nearly gone now.

      Delete
  3. On what street is the Manchester Unity Building? I have not seen it before. It is quite incredible, and certainly a change from some of the rather dull modern architecture.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. CM, it is on the corner of Swanston and Collins Street. I was standing on the opposite side of the street in the City Square.

      Delete
  4. I think I have made this comment previously on your blog but Sydney used to have an identical building to your Manchester Unity Building (then called the T&G Building) but it has long disappeared from Sydney's skyline.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Victor, we still have our quite impressive T&G building. I will take photos one day. There are some nice T&G buildings in country towns.

      Delete
    2. What does T&G stand for?

      Delete
    3. Good question River, and I don't have a clue. Shall you google or shall I?

      Delete
  5. I remember the Manchester Unity building as being a stand out architectural gem. Is that iron thing in the wall of the house a reinforced steel beam to protect the structure of the building?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Marie, it is an old fitting and I would guess something was attached to it, maybe a cable but I can't work out for what purpose. Our buildings then were very well made and did not need steel.

      Delete
  6. I must pop into the city to see the 'host of daffodils' some time - trouble is I think we are usually away when they bloom
    Man Unity building is the best - I get a crooked neck looking at it sometimes - plus have people bump into me because I stand in the one spot for so long lol
    Cathy

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cathy, it was probably nearly two months ago when I took the photo, or maybe a bit less. Like you, I am always looking up.

      Delete
  7. The Manchester Unity building definitely has a Manhattan vibe going on; it's a beauty!
    I think I could force myself to live in the house next door, although I'm very off cities, both large and small, at the moment.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jac, do tell why you are off cities at the moment? Cities are people..........ah, maybe that is why.

      Delete
  8. Fine place and wonderful photos.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I feel like I just went on a very quick world trip.
    Merle.........

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Merle, all within a couple of kilometres.

      Delete
  10. What a brilliant eclectic group of photos! You are a very observant person as you move around. Good for you Andrew!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Carol, yet at times it takes R to point out the bleeding obvious interesting thing to me. Then he runs away while a take a photo.

      Delete
  11. Manchester Unity Building that looks good.
    The ceilings are high in the one you 'could' live in, only one flight of stairs i presume..it's also a lovely building.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Margaret, but not absurdly high as in some modern places

      Delete
  12. the Manchester Unity building does look like it would be at home in Manhattan.
    It's a shame that Terrace set has been spoiled by the removal of a verandah, perhaps it was damaged somehow and will be replaced in the future. The iron thingy on the side might have been some sort of wire connection, electrical or phone? we may never know.
    I love that water soak; if I had enough yard and enough $$$, I'd have one too, leading into a waterfall and pond.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. River, I think you are correct, some kind of wire connection. Perhaps an anchor for a cable for wires so they are not stretched.

      Delete
  13. A interesting selection of shots. I love the sea of yellow daffodils and the different architecture. What do you know about the suburb "Glen Iris"? That is where my daughter has found a little house to rent. She likes it because it has a big back yard and a small school close by.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Diane, I know rather a lot about Glen Iris. I have known it for most of my life. We lived there '89 to '92. It is not the most expensive suburb but it is expensive. A little house? Not too many of those in GI. There are some ex housing commission houses which may be smallish.

      Delete
  14. What a great and eclectic collection of photos!

    ReplyDelete
  15. The Cook cottage is cute, and I'd love to live in something like that. I like tree lined avenues where, when leafed out, I feel like I'm going down a tree tunnel.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Strayer, from memory the cottage has really low ceilings, so it rather depends how tall you are. They are great trees.

      Delete
  16. Are your summers as dry as ours in the west Andrew? J'adore the avenue of elms still in winter mode? The MU building is pretty spectacular, it looks like it may rather dominate its surrounding buildings.. luverly daffs, couldn't get more spring :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Grace, yes, very dry. We'll all be rooned.

      Delete
  17. Spring in Australia!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes Susie, but well over a month ago, maybe two months.

      Delete
  18. Regarding the iron thingie up on the wall - apparently they are called anchor plates:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anchor_plate

    ReplyDelete
  19. I think you are correct Marcus. There is not really evidence of anything being attached to it, so it is holding something together within the building. It would be unusual I think to be put in place when the building was constructed, but clearly it is quite old.

    ReplyDelete