Sunday, September 27, 2015

Sunday Selections

Joining in with River and others for Sunday Selections.

Today is a selection of some photos I took at St Kilda Junction. I have shown you the area before, but nothing in the city stays the same, except perhaps very old trees. I am a bit disappointed in many of these photos. Perhaps I am getting too used to high quality photos I am seeing on some blogs.

St Kilda Junction's first highrise. It is not really tall but boy is it visible, from all directions and dominates the skyline. I was very against it being built because once one tall building is erected, it is only a matter of time before another will appear. Is this the way of future architecture? Take a look at this one in Toronto.  I wonder if the inspiration was found at Trinity Wharf in London's dock area?


Swinging the camera around to the south, see what I mean about a precedent set? Low rise St Kilda Junction will be history very quickly.


This is our most wonderful Corroboree Tree and visible from many locations but seldom noticed by people as they speed past below and to its side.


This plaque explains its history.


The barrier is to stop our native possums climbing the tree and damaging it.


The area has had a tidy up since I was last there. Much better now, with seats to sit and contemplate the majestic tree in front of you.


Jacobs was a respected English born Jewish businessman and philanthropist.


I could not even get a reasonable photo of the grandstand until I fiddled with some settings. The name Blackie was not because he was black, but just his name.


Look further up St Kilda hill the precedent came to pass, with a much taller building under construction.


St Kilda Park Primary School is pretty and dates back to 1881.


Look closer at its beauty. Parents are revolting at the school as the tram company wants to build a platform stop opposite the school driveway and the stop will prevent mummies from turning right when leaving the school. Given its tiny zoned catchment area, the kids should damn well walk to school.


A building on Fitzroy Street unnoticed by me until now. It's a nice reuse of an existing building.


This tram light rail replaced the St Kilda train line back in the 1980s. The train trip took, from memory, something like 9 minutes. It now takes around 25 minutes by tram to the centre of town. That is rather a step backwards. These new huge trams were needed to cope with the numbers of passengers and even they at times are not large enough.


The George Hotel, very much looking like the grand seaside pub it once was.


35 comments:

  1. Love the Corroboree tree. Majestic and beautiful. It will have seen a lot of changes over the years...
    Walk to school? Here that seems to be very, very rare. As rare as the opposite was when I was at school.

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    1. EC, when I was a lad there was no walking. We had to crawl to school.

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    2. Up hill both ways? Through a snowstorm? :D

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    3. Correct River.

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  2. I agree with you all kids should walk to school, there are a lot of chummies around.
    You do have some lovely buildings in your home town maybe some white elephants too, but we all have those
    Merle.................

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    1. Merle, yes kids are skinny like they used to be. Not much hope for them when they are older.

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  3. That St Kilda building looks like an untidy pile of milk crates. I prefer the Toronto version.

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    1. Victor, yes the Toronto one is not too bad. Do you kind of want to straighten up the milk crates so they are at least neat.

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  4. Andrew the building in the first photo is very strange. The tree is really impressive. And the school is very old.

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    1. Gosia, it is a very odd building and in such an open space, it stands out.

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  5. Great photos Andrew and love seeing Melbourne through your eyes. I agree with your comment about parents dropping kids to school ~ so many of high school age here. And so few bikes for such a large school. That building in Toonto looks like it could topple over with those different levels ~ but what would I know.

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    1. Carol, yes, playgrounds should be full of bikes. At times I see quite young children, 8-10 perhaps, making their own way to school by tram and then foot. Not sure that I would let a child do that, but I guess it depends on the maturity of the child.

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  6. Probably your new phone will have a super high quality built in camera. :) A lot of my shots are camera phone shots these days. But The Other Half just got a new phone and his are like 20x better than mine.. :)

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    1. Snoskred, that is one thing I did not look at. The S3 one was pretty good, except in low light.

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  7. People don't walk to school here either, no matter how close. And everything is fairly close in a fairly small town. Well, within a couple miles or so. Most kids live within half mile however. But don't walk. That tree is old! Some history there. That is some building, looks like a game where you stack pieces til they topple.

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    1. Strayer, that is ridiculous to be driven half a mile except in very bad weather. By our standards the tree is very old, but by yours, not so old. Remember the tree I showed in Canada dating from 12th century. I made a blog post about it a long while ago, but what did they do to the tallest tree in Australia? Cut it down to measure it.

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    2. They cut it down??
      Don't they know you can measure the height of something by the angle of the sun and the length of the shadow? or some such method. Ask any physics professor. Or math teacher who knows his geometry.

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    3. http://highriser.blogspot.com.au/2011/05/tallest-tree-in-world.html
      River, I should have read the old post first. It was the tallest tree in the world and it seems that it was not cut down to measure it, but its height was checked with a theodolite.

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  8. There is something NQR with your pics, maybe a setting on the camera. They are dark. We should do a photo walk together some day!

    I like the interesting architecture. Imagine if we had some Frank Gehry in Melbourne, oh the outrage it would create!!

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    1. The seem ok in bright sun but yes, I am going to have to check settings. I might just default them first and see what happens. I like some of Gehry's buildings.

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    2. I saw some of his stuff in Dusseldorf, I loved it.

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  9. That building under construction, 9th photo, has a lean to rival the tower of Pisa. The first photo, I thought was a randomly stacked pile of shipping containers until I noticed the windows.
    The George Hotel looks very nice, wonder how much they charge to stay there? I'll google it.

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    1. Probably photographer error about the 9th photo, River. London's Trinity Wharf area has shipping containers used as housing and offices.

      I think the The George is mostly apartments now.

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  10. I see those coloured packing cases in the centre of the Junction, every day as I come home from work. They looked horrible at first, but I assumed the building would be finished off properly within a few months. Wrong :(

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    1. Hels, in defence of the building, it doesn't look quite as bad as it did in the artist impressions before it was built.

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  11. An interesting trot around St Kilda. I like the funny building, the school and the Koroboree tree. I hope it stays there forever.

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    1. Diane, the tree is well looked after, as much as any tree can be. I think it will see us out.

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  12. A good and varied Sunday selection Andrew. Possums, they do cause problems for the trees..

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    1. Margaret, your basic ring tail and brush tail are huge in numbers and cause heaps of problems, but they are protected. Of course it what white people in Australia have created that have caused the explosion in numbers. The same with kangaroos.

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  13. Very interesting to see Melbourne through your eyes ! I love the Georges hotel, it looks so old !

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    1. Gattina, at I guess I reckon it would have been built about 1880. The was depression Australia in the 1890s, so before then.

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  14. Thanks for another great tour. St. Kilda Junction's first high-rise is fun, playful, and cute; but I don't think it's a design that will grow old gracefully. I sure wouldn't want to be looking at THAT for a very long time.

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    1. Mitchell, I did not consider it ageing, but you are right. I suspect in ten years time we will hear, who thought that was a good idea?

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  15. The first building looks like containers piled haphazardly on top of each other. I went over to the second link and sure enough, there were container buildings!

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    1. Hi Jo, it was only as I was writing this that the containers came to my mind. They work fine as low rise in London's dock area.

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