Friday, August 07, 2015

Day 20 US, 10/07, NY, High Line & MOMA

I worry about the security of wires more than clothes or grooming products when travelling.


The view from our lounge room at the side of the Port Authority.


From the none too clean bathroom window, clearly less accessible.


We are off to walk on the High Line, a lineal park sitting on top of a disused elevated goods line. This time I planned properly. We would walk to the northern end at West 30th and 10th Avenue, walk for a good distance along the line and leave at West 14th near to a subway back to the Port Authority. As we left the flat, police had taped off an area in West 40th. We learnt the next evening that a woman had been sexually assaulted in a lift within the Port Authority. While there seemed to be less cctv cameras in America than here, there were still quite a number and police had a clear photo of the alleged perpetrator.

Stacked car parking.



Stairs up to the High Line.


Some of the train track remains in place.



Looks a bit like a fig tree.







This was flowing water long here, great to cool your feet off.



Back down at ground level we wandered along West 14th.


The condition of some streets in New York leave a lot to be desired.


I saw more than one articulated bus. New York needs Boris Buses.


An appallingly gratuitous and sexist photo as an example of the excesses of advertising in Western media, never mind the effect on young fat and skinny kids who might strive and fail to obtain such a body. Albeit, hot isn't he. Ah, the memories of what I once was.


A mini flat iron building. Bah, I wanna see the real one.


I sniggered at the district name. My tablet in the flat gave our location as either Chelsea or the delightfully named Hell's Kitchen.


This was quite disgusting, not unlike Canada's dish poutine. I did not like it at all but R enjoyed it. I could see it being directly responsible for a heart attack.


The A line back to our flat for a rest in the cool and then off on the E line to MOMA, the Museum of Modern Art. It was quite impressive and absolutely huge. The helpful one armed lad at the desk told us it was a free evening if we were prepared to wait until 4.30. It was then a little before 4. We made a snap decision to pay and it turned out to be the right decision as we soon saw the queue for free admission and after 4.30, boy did it get busy.


You know I like art deco, and there is much art deco in New York.



These pieces by Otto Prutscher are exquisite. Who is Prutscher? Over to you Hels.


R gets very wary of me taking photos in public and usually moves away. I saw no signs that I could not take photos in MOMA and plenty of people were snapping away. I went to take a photo of a painting and a guard warned me off. I was puzzled and R was jubilant that I had been told off. I later learnt that you can take photos, just not with a flash, which I had no intention of using.

I suppose I was a bit crabby about the whole business, so when someone taking photos of his wife in front of a work I was looking at asked me to move out of shot, I snapped back at him, it is an art gallery, not a photographic studio.

This looked inviting but it was not yet dinner time.


Once back at the flat, I googled gay bar with our address and there was one not too far away, the 9th Avenue Saloon. We had a couple of drinks there, just sitting and watching other patrons and the bar staff. It was interesting to watch how people tipped. It seemed inconceivable that anyone would touch a tip left on the bar, even though un-noticed by the bar tender. I think I learnt more about tipping from observing in the bar than any time else. We dined next door at a nice Thai Restaurant, Yum Yum. After drinks in the bar and wine with dinner, neither of us recall terribly clearly the walk back to the flat but we agreed we had a fun time. Earlyish start in the morning.

Later edit: Hels did make mention of Prutscher in this post.

28 comments:

  1. Looks like your little travel journal is serving you well remembering such detail. The High Line looks fascinating and I have never heard of it, so something for me to look into. Thank you Andrew. Those fries floating in whatever that is does look disgusting to me. Pass.

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    1. Carol, it is good going back of the holiday and I am sure I remember more by doing so. Cheese, gravy and more cheese.

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  2. Another full day. Glad you posted some photos of the High Line as that was a favourite of mine. That food looked yukky! I am surprised at R. I thought he was a man of taste.

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    1. Marie, I rather wish I had known less about the High Line before walking it. I was what I expected, good nevertheless. The English comes out in R when chips are involved and I doubt it would matter how they are served.

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  3. I am so enjoying travelling with you. And also enjoying not having tried that dish. It looks truly vile.

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    1. EC, I am not one for gravy and also a little bit of a cheese snob, so it wasn't for me, but I did have a few chips, just to try it.

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  4. I've seen more of NY with you two than I did when there but we were only there a day and night.
    Merle.........

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    1. Merle, we were told a week was probably enough for NY, but even in four days you can see rather a lot.

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  5. I had a great week there earlier this year and can't wait to return. I'm glad you seem to have had a good time.

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    1. Frank, the key to your visit is 'earlier in the year', when no doubt the weather was less trying. We did have a good time and how wonderful to see the iconic New York sights, and sites.

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  6. I like that art deco....radio? it looks like it would fit in anywhere. I also like those colourful things on sticks in front of that building. Any idea what they were or why they were there?
    I like chips, even chips and gravy, but not with gravy and melted cheese.

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    1. River, yes, a radio. Maybe the one above it is a radio too, not just a clock. Look at the blue in the radio, such a modern lighting colour seen everywhere now. No idea about the shapes on sticks. Don't forget even more cheese on the side.

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  7. Oh dear frogs and pollywogs, I think I'd rather eat liver than that (literal) 'mess' of fries... I can eat fries, but they aren't a favourite.
    I would love to walk the Line; I recall Mitchell doing a similar post and found it fascinating as well.

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    1. Jac, I'll bet GS likes chips. Nice Cash reference. Wish I had thought of it. Yes, I read Mitchell's post about it but I was already aware of it. I should go back and re-read it.

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    2. GS does like his chips; two or three times a year. Whilst he does occasionally miss the foods he grew up with, he's definitely embraced a lighter, healthier way of eating. Thank goodness!

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    3. Jac, I am sure he does not miss haggis.

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  8. The high line seems like such a great idea - I'm pleased that it's so popular. I love the stacked car parking! Even I, as a Brit would turn my nose up at that dish but I bet it tasted better then it looked. The billboard hunk is Calvin Harris - a Scottish lad, although I think it took him living in America to get that body and bleached teeth!

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    1. No Craig, it tasted disgusting to me. Later I complained I was hungry, but R was not. What billboard? I didn't take much notice.

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  9. Flowing water to keep your feet cool..oh my, what next.
    Dreadful potholes, might easily turn an ankle...
    That food looks disgusting...I wouldn't eat it, guess I'd go hungry.

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    1. Margaret, I did go hungry.

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  10. My uncle, aunt and first cousins lived in New York, so it was a trip we made regularly. Yet noone ever mentioned the High Line.

    When the entire High Line was about to be demolished in 1999, a community-based group immediately got itself established. The plans to turn the High Line into an elevated park or greenway actually came to fruition, much to my utter amazement. It shows that community action can (occasionally) work!!

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    1. Hels, the most interesting aspect is that it was a community group, right in the heart of New York.

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  11. How interesting, your walk on the High Line. The streets in most American cities are bad. They are here, even in this small town in many places. Here, for some reason, the sidewalks appear and vanish, maybe twenty feet of sidewalk, then nothing and you must walk in the street. Those fries are disgusting, something you might get at a gas station mini mart but not at a restaurant. Yuk! That's funny about R hanging back while you took snapshots then getting happy over your encounter with the guard.

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    1. Strayer, yes we did learn that suburban areas are not great for walking, so often without made footpaths. Remember how Governor Reagen cut taxes by a large amount in California and all the infrastructure began to fall apart.

      That was the only place we went to that was called a diner, but it wasn't like a diner I had in mind.

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  12. Those chips look awful! I'm glad you didn't eat them!

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    1. I tried a couple Fen.

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  13. We liked the Highline.

    We also tried MOMA on the free evening but the queue for admission stretched over two blocks so we didn't bother to wait and returned another day for paid admission.

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    1. Very wise, Victor. Nice of the lad to inform us anyway.

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