Saturday, July 25, 2015

Day 9 Canada, 29/06, To Chase

Not happy. I hit a key that deleted this whole post. Take two.

There was quite a longish distance to drive today to Chase, along the Trans Canada Highway, which wasn't taking me home. The highway has had a lot of money spent on it, with fencing to prevent roaming animals being killed by vehicles and overpasses or underpasses for them to cross. This is an overpass.


Still plenty of beautiful scenery.


A classic truck stop.




From memory our coach, with nearly fifty people and luggage, had to be under 23,300 kg. We weighed in at just under 23,000.


Avalanches are a regular occurrence in Canada. Many are at the same locations each year so a 'sled' across the road might be constructed, such as this one, rather than having the road blocked and perhaps people trapped or worse. At times large amounts of threatening snow will be just blown up by the authorities before an avalanche begins. 



We stopped at 3 Valley Gap to investigate the recreated historical village and within the site, a round house. That is like a train depot shed with a turntable within.


A tree dating back to the 12th century.


Incorporated into the building.


I was disappointed to not see cars like this all over Canada and the US, well new ones.How could Carol and Mike possibly fit their half dozen in anything smaller.


The historical village was interesting and a longer time to visit would have been good.


That's the round house on the left.


It was magical to see these nectar birds hovering and darting around. There were three of them at one point.




Inside the round house. There were plenty of engines and carriages to see.


Anyone my age will surely remember former Canadian Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau and his wife Margaret. He once made use of this carriage, normally used by the Governor General, to travel in Canada. As the train passed by a group of protesters, unhappy with his government's policies, he stuck his finger up at them and they were not impressed. Within the train were a sitting room, a double bedroom with en suite, a room for a ladies maid and another bedroom, a bathroom and an office.



A good use for barrels.



Moving along the highway to Craigellachie, where the last spike was driven in after construction of the trans Canada railway.


A freight train passed by.


Sicamous, the house boat capital of Canada.


An osprey next, I believe.


We arrived at our accommodation Quaaout Lodge, just out of the town of Chase and over looking Little Shuswap Lake.





I had the impression that the lodge was owned by a trust of local First Nation people. It was a nice place and well run, and quite lovely to overlook the lake.


There was thunder and lightening as we trooped across to we knew what not.


No, we would not fit in here.


We could fit in the almost underground native house though. There was quite a lot of information about the First Nation lifestyle but rain came in the central opening, making the wood damp and we were nearly smoked out. We had been standing for quite sometime and people were getting very fidgety.


Quite interesting information, some of which I will remember.


It was then on to a barbeque dinner.


Next morning the rain had gone and we were off to our next stop, Whistler.





24 comments:

  1. ANDREW, IT WAS ANOTHER FANTASTIC DAY. Is it a shop made from barrels? The construction is amazing..

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  2. So the vintage car looks like bus in Europe...

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    1. Gosia, petrol used to be so cheap there and they could afford to run these huge cars. Not now.

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  3. I was fascinated by all the old cars we saw seemingly abandoned in backyards. I imagine they are gradually stripped for their parts.

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    1. Victor, I too noticed so many abandoned cars on properties, the cars in varying states of disrepair.

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  4. How frustrating to lose a post like that. And there is a lot of work in an informative and beautiful post like this one. Thank you for doing it all over again.
    Canada is heading up my list of 'dream' destinations fast.

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    1. EC, to the use the American term, aw shucks. Canada is a brilliant place to visit, and I think not to bad to live in. But then there is winter.

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    2. Andrew: Their winter just adds to the charm in my eyes...

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  5. You had a busy day of it sometimes on these tours they give you so much information you are no longer taking it in but you did remember a fair bit.
    Merle........

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    1. Oh yes Merle, I have forgotten so much already.

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  6. I've been losing posts of late as well; the keyboard on my new laptop is just a trifle too big for the reach of my pudgy little fingers, lol. I empathise, it's aggravating as can be after all that work.

    Hummingbirds are feisty little souls, but they look like winged jewels so they're always forgiven.

    The tipi you couldn't fit in? Two Bear and I had one like it (a lodge, properly) but it had been extensively painted by a friend. Actually, it was my lodge since ownership always goes with the woman. It was considered fairly large, with it's 16 poles.

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    1. Jac, your tipi? sounds quite large. 'I've got sixteen poles and you only have ten'. Interesting that the ownership goes with woman.

      Seeing the hummingbird was a quite special thing for me.

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  7. More beautiful scenery. I love the barrel house. The underground house is I suppose insulated against the winter cold more than an above ground one. Your trip seems fantastic!

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    1. Strayer, yes it would be warmer underground. In an opal mining are in Australia, houses are underground because it is cooler.

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  8. Hummingbirds are fascinating.

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    1. I thought so Ad Rad. I was excited to see them.

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  9. Well the transportation theme would have been right up your street (or is that boulevard)? The lodge looks rather nice. I miss hummingbirds. Until we left California I never actually realised that they were only to be found in the Americas. They are very aggressive with each other around those feeders.

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    1. Craig, yes about the transport theme, but not enough time to explore properly.

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  10. Really wonderful photos. Greetings!

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    1. Thank you Blogoratti. How nice to hear from you again.

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  11. Dreadful when we lose what we have written...but life goes on.
    Seems you had a lovely day. I didn't know about blowing up suspect avalanches, I hadn't given it a thought actually..
    The train, interesting too...

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    1. Margaret, nor did I know about blowing dangerous snow up. Interesting, I thought.

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  12. How did I miss this one? I like the rock paintings at the end there. The tipi (teepee? Indian tent) reminds me of one I bought for my grandchildren when they were small. They loved it for years until one day my T washed it and it fell apart, all they had left was the poles.
    Love the Canadian scenery.

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    1. River, Jac usually knows what she is talking about, so I reckon tipi might be closer to correct. Like you, I would spell it teepee. It was not a teepee but just a tent when we were kids and the same thing happened,.

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