Sunday, July 19, 2015

Day 3 Canada, 23/06, To Kamloops

We had two days of travel on the train with an overnight stay at a town called Kamloops. We were in the Red Leaf class. Silver Leaf and Gold Leaf were of a higher standard with more staff, hot meals and better views with the Gold Class have a separate dining area and and overhead panoramic windows. The Red Leaf class is to be discontinued soon and the carriages converted to Silver Leaf with a higher class added above Gold Leaf.

For a reason that neither of us could then or now work out, apart from cost cutting, the Silver and Gold folk had their luggage transported to their Kamloops hotel whereas the Red folk had to forgo their luggage for one night and it would be at the following hotel. It didn't matter hugely and it was certainly easy to get going the next morning.

We were loaded onto our train carriage and off before 8am, slowly crawling through the Vancouver suburbs.



RM staff waved us off.


What was good about being in Red Leaf is that it was only half full and we had plenty of space to move around, change seats and use the viewing platform.


Vancouver suburban transport.


Of bridges, we saw very many.




Timber is no longer moved by being floated down river but it is often stored in the rivers to preserve the wood.


Water, of which we were to see rather a lot. This is probably the Thompson River which we travelled along the banks of to reach Kamloops. Earlier we had been alongside the Fraser River.



Look! Snow on the mountains. We were to see rather a lot of that.


The water is full of glacial silt, hence the water colour.



 We were to see lots of water, trees and rocks.



Candian rivers are often angry rivers, flowing very fast, not caring what is in front of them. Each droplet quarrels with his mate to get to the sea a little faster.



The country side has become very dry with tree cover becoming sparse.



Sage bush is edible to cattle, I think, and perhaps moose and deer, but neither were to be seen in the dry area. I believe the fixer upper was going very cheaply.



Probably an eagle nest. As you can see the train telephone wires are redundant and have not been used since the late 1950s. They have lasted amazing well considering the extreme weather. It was going to cost a phenomenal amount to remove them and as you can see, they can be still useful.




Entering a tunnel.


An abandoned mental institution village. Discussions are underway about the site's future.



Another inukshuk as we entered Kamloops and passed by the First Nation cemetery. 


Cooling off on a hot day? Given it is a river fed by glaciers, freezing yourself on a hot day.


Attractive apartments for local people.


Our Kamloops hotel was very old but it had been modernised, many times I think. 






It rather reminded of the London's Lancaster Gate Hotel, where you walked both up and down stairs to get to your room.


Bless!


We wandered the streets for a bit, looking at various place to dine and nothing appealed, until we found an Irish pub called Carlos O'Bryan's and its rooftop. I don't drink much beer, but a couple of Coronas was very welcome in the heat as the sun started to set. So often we were caught out by it being later that we thought because of late setting of the sun. More confusion with the card payment machine.


Not sure what the building with the tower is. I like it. 


Next post will be much photo lighter and I will tell you about the absurdness of the trans Canada trains, beginning in the late nineteenth century and continuing to this day.

28 comments:

  1. This is where our trips differed so I am very keen to see what I missed by not going on the RM. Weather looks as though it was kind to you as you have captured some great views.

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    1. Marie, I don't think we saw anything too special during the train trip that we would not have seen from the road, but it was great to have a host to point things out.

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  2. I must have missed Part 2 yesterday. Will go back and check. Travel is tiring.

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    1. Carol, travel is always tiring, but less so when someone else does the thinking and planning for you.

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  3. Andrew, thanks for a fantastic pictorial walk. The eagle nest is very interesting in my place storks have the similar nests

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    1. Gosia, I hope I was correct about it being an eagle's nest.

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  4. I like all the photos. The river does look angry, but your description is awesome. I love this tour of your trip.

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    1. Strayer, we really don't have rivers like that here. I was very impressed.

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  5. I am really, really enjoying travelling with you. Strayer is right, that is an excellent description of rushing water.

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    1. Thank you EC. I am pleased you are enjoying the read.

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  6. Oh, I loved the photo tour! Traveling by train is the best.

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    1. Jo, it is a relaxing way to travel, even if frustratingly slow at times.

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  7. That first day on the train was a disappointment for us as we expected those breathtaking scenes of snow capped mountains and pristine lakes that feature in the travel brochures.

    But then there was the second day on the train.

    I'm interested in your comments about the red leaf class travel. I had wondered what was different about the class we travelled in from the rest.

    We found the organisation of the Kamloops transfer of passengers and baggage from and back to the train to be superb.

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    1. Victor, I had forgotten how dry it was during the trip to Kamloops. Yes, there was nothing wrong with the transfers. Most of what I know about Gold Leaf was what I heard from others. We were pretty happy with the Red Leaf.

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  8. It is the middle of summer there It looks nicer than here at the moment but not the amt of trees I imagined there would be but as you move into the mountains I expect it to become wilder and more trees.
    Merle............

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    1. You are quite correct Merle. Many many trees.

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  9. The reflection looks good.
    The bedroom looks alright, much like what we have stayed in in Australia. The rivers look rapid to me...

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    1. I was pleased with the reflection photo, Margaret. I took another just of the reflection.

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  10. I bet you didn't put your hand on that ute.
    Okay, we've had bridges, where are the blokes? And where's my glacial rock? It hasn't arrived in the post yet. Typical, promise the world and get bridges.

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    1. Jah Teh, the dogs looked friendly to me. There may some bloke photos in the future, to satisfy a gay divorcee. What I thought was a glacial rock turned out to be just glacier ice and it melted. Sorry about that.

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  11. I'm really enjoying trailing along on your holiday; I've often daydreamed of traveling cross country by train.
    Your description of the river was fabulous prose Andrew, and so apt.

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    1. Jac, to be honest, two days on the train was enough for us.

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  12. Now that is the ultimate way to travel to the rockies. Let someone else do the train driving. I'd love to have done that. It looks superb.

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    1. Craig, the second day on the train had much nicer scenery but I expect you see just as much when travelling by road.

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  13. You saw a lot during your train trip ! Looks interesting and beautiful !

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    1. Gattina, a lot of rocks and trees and water. See tomorrow's post.

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  14. This is almost as good as seeing it all first hand.
    did you buy the fixer-upper?? (*~*)
    Don't you wish Australia had even half that water?

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    1. River, I said to R, look a honeymoon cottage for when we get married. Lead balloon moment. The water in Canada is extraordinary, yet river flows have dropped and this is of great concern there.

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