Saturday, July 18, 2015

Day 2 Canada, 22/06, Around Vancouver Pt 1

Too many photos for one post, so I have split the day into two.

As part of the tour, after a supplied buffet breakfast at the hotel, our coach which we came to know very well, collected us and took us for a morning tour of Vancouver. We were soon at the very well known Stanley Park. Look how dry the grass is! British Columbia was quite short of rain. Later after we finished our tour there were bush fires, as we call them, and a smoke haze covered Vancouver, so my friend Victor informed me.

The Prevost was nearly brand new from the Quebec factory. It was very comfortable. A friend who knows about buses told me they have a wide central aisle which makes the bus quite wide, too wide in his opinion.


Ah, Victor in Sydney. Co-incidentally he and a friend were travelling a similar path to us a week later, with the biggest difference being that we were in steerage with Travelmarvel and he was with the more upmarket parent company APT. He has already posted a little about his trip. Also coincidentally, Marie in London had been in Canada travelling with a friend a few weeks before us. We did not find the time to visit the very famous Calipano Bridge, but you can read Marie's account of it here.


I forget exactly what these are but obviously something related to the native people who are generally referred to not as aborigines or indians, but First Nation people.


I thought this was a water feature.



After closer inspection, it was just a garden sprinkler. We saw rather a lot of these non fixed portable sprinklers in Canada. Most of our Australian sprinklers are fixed systems buried in the ground. It was nice to see the water spraying from a rotating sprinkler.


Stanley Park is located on a small peninsula jutting out into the harbour, so in our coach we progressed around the park perimeter. You can see the rather grand suspension bridge linking Vancouver to North and West Vancouver.


A diagram showing the far shore.


This is the Lions Gate Bridge, linking the south with the north. It is very impressive.
 

A lion needs to guard the Lions Gate Bridge.


I had a bit of a look on the net but was unable to establish exactly why the Guinness family, of which I know a little as Bryan Guinness married the Mitford sister Diana, had such an interest in Vancouver. I can only conclude it was for financial reasons.



R stepped into this tree hollow and made a silly face. He would kill me if I showed you.


Right in front of our eyes a car broke down on the bridge and the single north bound lane was blocked.


Some form of ghastly tourist conveyance.


Probably Third Beach. Do people lie on the timber or are they sand retainers, I wonder.


This First Nation totem in known as an inukshuk and they can be seen all over Canada. I bet our Friend in Japan knows more about them than I do.


We toured on to Granville Island, which is not an island but may have once been. It is a creation for both local and foreign tourists at an old industrial site.




It was a pleasant area and we wished we had more time there.


I was surprised at the number of apartments in Vancouver. No doubt as you move away from the inner area, more houses are to be seen.


Not all industry has left Granville Island. It is beneficial for a concrete plant to be near the city where all the building work happens, so the concrete plant has remained. Nice of the company to decorate their silos. Note the concrete truck wheels up in the air. I had never seen such a thing and I think it may be related to the trucks carrying more mixed concrete and are bigger than our local trucks.


This was supposed to demonstrate the workings of the concrete plant but not very much of it worked. It reminded me of the board game Mousetrap.


I can't remember what this orb structure is, but I have seen photos of it illuminated at night and it is quite spectacular. With it not becoming dark until about 10.00 pm, we did not see much in the way of lighting.


I believe this stadium is known as BC Place.


The French are coming. Man the cannons.


I think this was taken in Robson Street, a major shopping and eating street. New high rise buildings are compelled or encouraged to have businesses on the ground floor, a few floors of residential above and then above there, offices. This should ensure there is always activity on the street. Note the overhead wires, not for a tram, but trolley buses.

21 comments:

  1. Loved the photos. Seems you enjoyed Vancouver as much as I did.

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    1. Marie, I thought it may have been oversold to us in advance, but we really liked Vancouver.

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  2. I really like the term First Nation people. It seems more respectful.
    And didn't the Mitfords know everyone...
    Thank you so much for this. Informative and decorative. I am so looking forward to hearing and seeing more.

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    1. EC, pity we can't come up with a similar name for our First Nation.

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    2. Not bad Jac, but with our propensity to shortening words, they would become the Dreamers.

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    3. Would that be a bad thing?

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    4. Maybe not. Grasp the word for your own use, but being a dreamer is slightly derogatory. I am guessing you know about the Aboriginal dreamtime.

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  3. Those cement trucks are interesting Andrew. They look like they might have a different system of filling and pouring. I am intrigued.

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    1. Carol, we could only see them from a distance, but we did later see one in the street with the raised wheels lowered. Everyone on the coach was intrigued by them.

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  4. The northwest is big on beer so the fame is probably simply due to the breweries of the Guinness family. Guinness beer is well "used" here in Oregon also. Those are the native totem poles, as we call them. Some tell stories, with symbols. We used to see them all the time when I was younger here, but not so much anymore. I wonder why.

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    1. Good info, thanks Strayer. What do you call your indigenous people on your side of the border?

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  5. Here we call our indigenous folk Native Americans, and occasionally First Nations... if we're lucky, we call them family. =D
    Totem poles were many things: An individual's or family's history might be recorded on them... some were strictly for genealogical purposes. They might record social status, or be a memorial or mortuary totem pole. Oddly, they were sometimes used to shame people until they did the right thing; at that point they were taken down.

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    1. Most interesting Jac. Clearly the totem poles were an important part of the societies.

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  6. We were told the Lions Gate Bridge was built privately by the Guiness Family who owned huge tracts of land on the West Vancouver side as a means for their transport across to the mainland. Later on the bridge was purchased from the Guiness family by the local authorities.

    That orb was built for the Worlds Fair which Vancouver hosted some decades ago. We travelled on those cute Aquabuses to Granville Island from near the Orb.

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    1. Victor, the Aquabuses would have been more fun than our coach.

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  7. Love the photos, makes me want to be there.
    Favourites are the hollow tree, the painted silos and that cute little aquabus.

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    1. River, I am slightly envious of Victor travelling in the Aquabus.

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  8. Lovely! Super memories for me. I used to walk the perimeter of Stanley Park most days and always liked Lions Gate Bridge for it's relatively small scale. Seeing a liner go under it at close proximity is wonderful. The aqua buses are super. We used to take one to Granville Island for groceries. Beautiful shots - thanks for the memories.

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    1. Craig, that is a decent walk, which I would not undertake, certainly now. It is a most attractive bridge.

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  9. I love Canadian aprtments

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