Tuesday, May 19, 2015

Yoghurt tasting

Some months ago R pointed out a new yoghurt on the supermarket shelves. I rather like yoghurt and I don't even mind natural yoghurt, although it can be hard to find. I had stopped eating yoghurt because anything other than plain yoghurt was so full of sugar. That is not what yoghurt is meant to be.

The new yoghurt was Chobani Greek style yoghurt. It was quite nice and no added fat. But fat is not our eating issue or yours, it is sugar and I think Chobani had a lot of sugar.

I began a search for the best yoghurt and I found it. I tried a Greek style yoghurt made in the Margaret River area of Western Australia, surely a good place for yoghurt when the area produces such good wines. It was nice enough but there seemed to be an aftertaste. I suspected a chemical sugar alternative.

My next yoghurt choice was from clean and green Tasmania, our island state. If there is a way to go, Tasmania should really go heavily down the clean and green road. The world will be at its feet. The Tamar Valley yoghurt was really nice, until I read the label, made from local and imported produce. So disappointing.

Here is a new one on the supermarket shelves, Gippsland Dairy. Gippsland is a region in Victoria to our east and much of it receives good rainfall and has rich soils and so is ideal for dairy cows. Their yoghurt was the best I have tasted. It is creamy with fruit swirled through it but not really sweet. Made slower to taste better, the label says. But again, made from local and imported ingredients. What is going on here? Is it the fruit that goes in the yoghurt imported? Can't we grow our own berries? Australians were recently alerted to the dangers of imported frozen berries from China.

Our labelling laws are a disgrace. We want to know what goes in our food and where it comes from, but the food companies must be fierce lobbyists as although new labelling laws have been talked about for years, nothing happens. How many Goodman Fielder shares do our politicians own?

24 comments:

  1. Andrew, it is very important to know what the food contain. In Poland we have a wide choice of yoghurts from European Union but I prefer Polish or German. Youghurt in Greek style is too sweet for me..

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    1. Gosia, yes, yoghurt is not supposed to be sweet.

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  2. I agree (conservatively speaking about 1000 per cent) about our labelling laws. Mostly I am very little wiser after I have read them than before I started.

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    1. EC, we don't really need to know the levels of vitamins etc. We need to know fat, sugar, salt, chemical additives and origin of produce.

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  3. Food is transported for thousands of miles; the same applies here. I try to buy local as far as I can. we have shops which sell ‘only local foods’ but even that is not 100% true at all times.

    I eat soya yogurt. Can’t eat dairy foods.

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    1. Friko, I think locally grown is something for the future for many people. But we have to then remember that fruits and vegetables are seasonal and so not always available.

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  4. I have given up on yoghurt here; it contains way too much sugar for me. The sugar-free brands are so full of chemicals I might as well suck on an oil well!

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    1. Jac, for an American you are awfully un-American. I expect there are many like you which is why I never judge Americans by media.

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    2. Funny, the Great Scot has said the same thing about me, lol.

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  5. I'm seriously considering making my own yoghurt. :)

    I find it worthwhile emailing the company to find out the truth about where the ingredients come from. A lot of times with yoghurt I suspect that they import gelatin from other countries to make it. But there might be fruit coming from other places too.

    From a quick google, take a look and see if you can find a brand called Springbrook which claims on their website to be fully australian grown and made in Victoria. :)

    If you can get a good yoghurt which is fully Australian made from Australian ingredients, you can always add your own fruit to it. :)

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    1. Snoskred, I should be a more diligent blogger and emailed the companies and posted their responses, but as I guess you have picked up, I just churn posts out. The fruit in the Gippsland yoghurt is delicious though. Funny, I thought of gelatin. Deja vu. Have I said this on your blog already? Springbook is awfully like Springbok, but I will take a look.

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  6. I know in the 1950s that when I took sour cream to school to add onto my lunch, people thought I was mad. But mum had always used it because her mum, my gran, always used it.

    Then in the 1960s, I learned to love yoghurt while abroad on a Gap Year. Afterwards, at home, I still couldn't find it in the shops. People thought it was manky.

    Then we became all cosmopolitan and Europeanised in the 70s. Everyone wanted to be cool and half vegetarian!

    The world constantly changes.

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    1. Hels, we use sour cream a bit. It goes well with potatoes. Even in the late sixties in the country, we did have an idea about yoghurt.

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  7. I would say the fruit content is the imported part of your yoghurt. We do grow excellent quality fruit here in Australia, but what happens to it? It goes overseas. Same as our top quality steak and seafood. We Australians are left with the dregs. Which are mostly very nice, good quality, but certainly not AAA.
    You just need to remember when you are shopping and something is labelled "top quality" it is only the best of the rest, not the really top notch stuff that is in the restaurants of Japan.

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    1. River, while we never fine dined in Japan, the quality of just fresh fruit and vegetables was first class, much of it grown near where it is eaten. It is sad they we have so accepted less than first class fresh food.

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  8. I'm guilty of not reading labels on food very much I'm afraid. Although I think that our labeling has improved drastically over the past 5 years. I default to a low fat (but probably not very low sugar) rhubarb yoghurt - I love them!

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    1. Craig, in England at least, the red, amber, green light indicators on food is a terrific idea. It is so easy for kids to understand. Don't think I have seen rhubarb yoghurt, but I would certainly give it a go. Sugar is evil, fat is good.

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  9. It's amazing what you find on packaging and how we are sometimes deceived where products are made, ingredients come from. I expect that's supposed to keep the costs down, but then the overseas people do not get paid very much at all, sad really the whole thing!

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    1. WA, I think fully Australian products need to promote their Australianess more than what they do and if they do have something from overseas in the product, tell us what it is.

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  10. I work on the theory that it's not what you eat but how much you eat that way if I really fancy, and I often do, a croissant or such like pastry with coffee for breakfast and be really really good for the rest of the day, it all balances out.. It's the French way naturellement :) So eat your full fat yogurt, which probably has less sugar anyway, just don't eat too much oui :)

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    1. Grace, that is very sensible. Diets that deprive people of anything really naughty to eat will never work. It is all about quantity.

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  11. There's something weird about the Chobani yoghurt, when it dries it goes weird... hard to explain.
    I love the Gippsland one but like you I was wary of the imported ingredients. I go through phases with yoghurt, i'm in a non yoghurt phase right now.

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    1. Fen, you wait until Chobani dries?

      I too go through yoghurt phases. Clearly I am in an eat yoghurt phase.

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    2. ha ha no, but the lid bit usually dries out and it goes strangely powdery

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