Thursday, May 07, 2015

What wall is that?

I receive posts from a tumblr called (can't remember the site name just now) Some of the photos are quite intriguing especially when a building has been abandoned as if people just stopped what they are doing and walked out.Clearly this is not anything like that but its title grabbed me, DamWallMtParisTas. Would that be our state of Tasmania? I know of no other. Look at those massive buttresses.


Shall we see what this is about? I found the answer on a blog called Think-Tasmania, one I already take a quick look at anyway. I'll begin with a location. The dam wall is in north eastern Tasmania about equi-distance between the towns of Scottsdale and St Helens. It was constructed on the Cascade River in 1936 by the Mount Paris Tin Mining company for operation of its hydraulic equipment. A water race took water several kilometres to the tin mine. The dam wall was hand built, a rather impressive feat.

The mine closed in 1961 by when the state government had already taken ownership of the dam. By 1985 it was under the control of the Water and River Supplies Commission. While it had held little water since the 1970s, the Commission blasted a hole in the dam wall to ensure proper river flows.

Vegetation is reclaiming the floor of the dam. The dam wall is popular with visitors and loved by locals.

29 comments:

  1. Andrew, it looks impressive. Tasmania is a nicestate because climate is friendly, there.

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    1. Gosia, it rarely gets so hot there but also a bit cooler.

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    2. HOBarctica about now.
      Kim of FrogPondsRock is freezing in HOB right now trying to have an exhibition - #mudandink - and Tweeted this film of snow today - "Oh dear. Hope it stops snowing soon."

      Dam great post though Andrew. I have been to the East of Tas and Wineglass Bay is lovely there is a shoreline golf club at StHelens.

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    3. Ann, I am aware Kim. I did not realise it was so cold there at the moment. Swansea and Wineglass Bay are wonderful. We did not visit St Helens.

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    4. snowing in Tassie? but it's only May...

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  2. That's an impressive construction. Are there any plans for its future?

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    1. Not that I saw Fun60. I suspect unless local volunteers take action, it may well disappear into the forest.

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  3. I love places like this as much as I abhor seeing beautiful buildings, etc... left to molder.
    One of my Pinterest boards is dedicated to abandoned buildings/sites, and old cemeteries.

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    1. Jac, and your imagination can recreate what went on there. I must find a couple of new sites to follow.

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  4. Love the way the vegetation is reclaiming the site. In a perverse sort of way it gives me hope.

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    1. EC, greenhouse effect aside, I don't think we can do much to permanently harm our earth. I hope anyway.

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  5. Tasmania has some great areas of natural beauty that will hopefully be preserved, even as the rest of Australia continues to destroy its Great Barrier Reef etc.

    I haven't been to Scottsdale, St Helens or the area in between - I tend to head straight to Hobart and surrounding areas.

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    1. Hels, it does have some great areas. I haven't been to either of those smaller towns either. A Tasmanian tour is on the list.

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  6. Interesting. Didn't know about that. It's pleasing to read the river is flowing and hopefully the vegetation continues to grow as normal. The dam wall.. should it remain or be removed! Guess it's part of history..

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    1. WA, I thought you may have known of it. If nothing is done to preserve it, nature will take it. Roots will grew in cracks in concrete and force it apart.

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    2. I will have to see if I can find it. Never seen a sign to it but then I may not having been looking. Am at the beach at the moment in the opposite direction....then Jury Duty next couple of weeks..

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    3. Did I really type roots will grew in cracks? Seems so. Just quickly bring down a guilty decision and then with google maps search for Mount Paris dam. It is a gravel road in though, but not too far.

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  7. It's a fabulous wall. If only our homes could be built as strongly.

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    1. River, yes, they would survive for thousands of years.

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  8. Terrible to admit that I have never been to Tasmania. That will have to be rectified some time I think.
    I bet standing near that dam wall is nothing like standing at the foot of the Maroondah Dam near Healesville. One extreme to the other!

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    1. Cathy, tis a lovely place. With our friend moving there, we hope to explore more of it soon.

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  9. Very interesting, and a great photo. Hand built!

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    1. Jackie, it was helped with petrol driven concrete mixers, but it certainly wasn't brought in already constructed.

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  10. I forgot to add: It's a dam shame. :D

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    1. Oh Jackie! How could you in one of my few vaguely sensible posts.

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  11. It's beautiful, and looks like the set from an ancient civilization movie, where the populace suddenly took off, and now some group has returned, to find this, and is wondering why whomever built it, ran. Cue suspenseful music.

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    1. Strayer, I know what you mean. Yes, just add the music.

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  12. It seems only right that roots will grow in cracks and reclaim their territory Andrew, It'll take a blooming long time and be interesting to watch the progress don't you think?

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    1. Grace, while it would be interesting to watch, I certainly won't live to see it. I hope it is kept clear though for people to see and wonder about.

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