Thursday, May 28, 2015

In Thanks

I forget how the subject arose but Sister criticised someone for not acknowledging something Little Jo did for them. I mentioned that Little Jo has never acknowledged anything I have ever sent her and nor did she write to R's Sister in England to thank her for gifts.

It seemed to have worked and I received this post card after they spent a weekend in Bendigo. I sent her information on concretion, if you remember my post about her 'fossil' find.



While I had the scanner open I copied R's certificate he received during Australia's volunteer week. He enjoys his volunteer work, last week taking on three days, but normally only one day a week and an extra day a month.



21 comments:

  1. Nice of you to remind sister that little Jo never thanks you. she certainly can't be critical of others when she hasn't taught Jo. Nice that you got a postcard with a tram on it, knowing how much you like trams and trains.
    I'm having vague thoughts of volunteer work myself, I expect the time will come when I tire of sitting on my bum 90% of the time.

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    1. River, kids would never write a thank you note of their own accord. It is up to the parents to teach them it is the right thing to do. River, while R is not a great one for socialising with the people there, it does give him something to talk about with other people and a reason to not sit around all day, which he admits he rather likes doing. He always makes an effort to go out each day.

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  2. Because of you, Jo will have learned a skill that will stand her in good stead throughout her life.

    I'd like to volunteer, if I can solve the transportation problem. Time to put on my thinking cap.

    I rather doubt you realise how many lives you touch, and in what ways - most of us don't. Funny, I don't really see you as fallow; is that also rude? ;-)

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    1. Jac, slightly reversed, that is his volunteer job, transporting people but with supplied vehicles, not his own. Really, we only keep two cars just for him to get to his volunteer job easily.

      Thanks for the reassurance. I was feeling a little maudlin. If I can have on my grave, he did no harm and maybe a little good, that is not so bad is it.

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  3. Yay for a lesson received, and acted on.
    And yay for R's volunteer work. And a bigger yay for it being appreciated.

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    1. EC, as I am sure you know, they will try to take advantage of volunteers, but he has learnt to say no where appropriate. Sometimes I think he should be paid. His hours at work would not be allowed if he was an employee.

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  4. I hope you will continue with her education and point her towards a blog instead of Farcebook. I see she spells like you do.

    When mother finally goes, I will not volunteer for anything except chair sitting.

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    1. Jah Teh, she is not really allowed the internet at home and so takes full advantage of the internet, or google as she refers to it, when she is here. However, in spite of screens been delayed to her when she was younger, she hungers for them now.

      My spelling? I take great reference to that. I thought her spelling of Bendigo was interesting. Apreshatid was a good attempt by a seven year old, I think. She had sent Mother a post card I noticed today when we there, sent from Porapunka. The correct spelling I have to check myself, Porepunkah. I think that is correct. I am developing old age dicklicksia.

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  5. Yes well done for "correcting" the communication ref Little Jo. It's sadly becoming a lost art. Would you have appreciated an email if that was sent? Good on R for his volunteer work.

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    1. Craig, I would have been happy enough with an email, but the handwritten card is so much nicer.

      I am quite proud of R for what he does, but of course it does not come close to being in the league of what you are doing.

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    2. PS - I decided against the second toilet related post today and it's something I had posted on my old blog anyway but possibly before you knew of it.
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VrrfRLV4VfI
      Have you seen this? It's a short ballet of The Infernal Galop from Matthew Bourne. I think that it's wonderful.

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  6. Well it boils down to manners. Parents teaching children the correct manners! Once in awhile all need reminding. It's good you spoke up! It got a good result.

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    1. WA, you are quite correct. This is not something to be left for schools. Parents need to do the basics for their children.

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  7. How wonderful to be appreciated. To thank someone is a lesson that should e learnt when young. But we are never too old to learn. Out with a friend last month I noticed that she often made complimentary remarks to waitresses or gallery workers. As she said it costs nothing to compliment someone who has made a special effort with their appearance or service and it will probably make their day. How right she is.

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    1. Fun60, the fairly static guards at our art galleries aren't particularly well paid and their job must be quite boring. I know they are watching me to see if I do wrong, but how good is it that they are there protecting our art works and get no thanks at all from the public. As remote as they are, your comment has inspired me to speak to one soon and thank them.

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  8. I don't always say thank you, sometimes I'm to lazy and sometimes I forget but I always mean to.
    Merle...........

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    1. Well Merle, people will think well of you if you do write a note.

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  9. It is important for children to be taught these social skills and parents are the people to best do that job. Grumpy uncles are important too. As a sole parent, I couldn't have got through the last 19 years without my sister and her husband. Sometimes aunts and uncles aren't so emotionally invested in things and can offer a more balanced view. It takes a village to raise a child.

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    1. Grumpy uncle Carol? Who might you be referring to? I don't know if you are a single mother, a widow or just someone who ended up on their own, but from what I have read, you have a good connection with your son. That your sister and bro in law have helped along the way is wonderful. Funny, at one time I imagined myself as the disconnected person in Little Jo's life, but she just loves her mum so much. I know it won't happen.

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  10. I think your prompt was a good thing Andrew. Sometimes parents can get bogged down with everyday life, can't we all :) and need a little nudge, that's where aware rellies come into the picture :)

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    1. Yep Grace. I am glad I said it.Uncle R is the loved one, even though no blood connection.

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