Tuesday, April 07, 2015

Williamstown

On a reasonably fine day when there is little wind where better to go than Williamstown for brunch. The town began its life as the major port in the Colony of Victoria (that would be wrong. We would have been Colony of New South Wales then) before Melbourne took over, so it is quite historic with some of its streets lined with Victorian buildings. Williamstown was even considered for the status of capital city of Victoria but it lacked fresh water whereas Melbourne with its Yarra River did not.

Nelson Place, where you can sit and look out to a foreshore reserve and then the bay, is place tourists want to be and we are no different.


It was a little quiet when we were there for reasons I have now forgotten. It is only a twenty minute drive from home or the city, so it is very easy to get to and you can also catch the train which we have done in the past.


I must return to get a better photo of the wonderful art deco building.


There is a stationary ex naval war ship permanently moored at Gem Pier, HMAS Castlemaine.


We are now around at the boat ramp where warm water is released from the occasionally used gas fired power station nearby and the waters are called The Warmies. The warm water attracts fish and hence fisher folk. The water in the foreground is an inlet where the warm water is released. Beyond is the shipping channel leading to the mouth of the Yarra River and Melbourne's port facilities.


From Melbourne you travel to Williamstown by car using the West Gate Bridge, seen in this photo. The bridge needed to be high enough to allow container shipping to pass below.


When the power station is operating flame can be seen burning at the top of the chimney. Obviously not today though.


The boat ramp area has been nicely redeveloped in a practical manner for launching boats.


At quite a speed a pilot boat was travelling along the channel out into the bay. All large ships to enter Port Phillip with its very narrow and treacherous entrance must have a pilot on board to oversee the navigation and pilots board ships about ten kilometres out to sea from the entrance, known as the The Rip, and a rip in the ship hull is what may happen if the navigation is wrong.

19 comments:

  1. That looks like a lovely outing. Thank you for taking us along...

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    1. It was nice EC. I think we washed the car at a self wash place beforehand.

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  2. Hello Andrew,

    We love making little forays out such as this trip if yours to Williamstown. Not too far to travel but a completely different environment for the day. It is just the thing, we find, to allow one to be a tourist in one's own country and sample the many delights that are on offer.

    Williamstown looks to be a delightful place with so much of interest both on land and at sea. The Art Deco building is a delight and we wonder if there are more in this style and what was its purpose.

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    1. JayLa, I do enjoy being a tourist in my own city. I doubt there is much Art Deco in the town and I will take another look at the building when we next visit.

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  3. I wish I had had more time to spend in Melbourne when I was in Aus as I didn't see anywhere like this charming coastal town.

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    1. Fun60, freeloaders come and stay and go The Highrise. You would be most welcome to stay here should you ever revisit Melbourne, and of course we would be happy to show you our Melbourne.

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  4. Familiar with the bridge, we always go that way unless going east which is not often....know the rip well, not a problem for us on the ships...

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    1. WA, which makes me wonder does the Spirit have a pilot? You should go east. Gippsland is lovely. Kinda of like.......Tasmania.

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    2. No as far as I know the Spirit doesn't have a pilot...We have been east a couple of times...it is lovely in parts..

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  5. The town looks like a nice quiet area, nice buildings.
    Is the war ship open to the public at all? It would be interesting to walk through and learn about it.

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    1. River, it is open to the public, for a fee of course. I think it is quite expensive, which is probably why we have never gone on board.

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  6. When my beloved first set up practice in Melbourne, he was lured to the western suburbs since there weren't enough services in the west back then. Some of the suburbs in the west were a bit ordinary, but Williamstown was always a delight. Nelson Place and the beach are great places to relax after a hard day's work!

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    1. Hels, just another place in Melbourne where property could have bought cheaply and would now be worth an awful lot of money.

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  7. Andrew, it was a lovely day. The photos with the sea amazing..And Nelson sound like in England probably is the same person

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    1. Gosia, yes, I think it would be the same Nelson.

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  8. Oh I do like to be beside the seaside....
    Nothing quite like a sunny relaxing day out like this is there? It all looks lovely but the art deco building is the star of the show for me!

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    1. Craig, R was getting impatient and so could not get proper photos of the building, but I will.

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  9. Can't wait to see more photos of the Art Deco building! Williamston looks like a relatively quiet area, but very pleasant; what a lovely, sunny day you had for visiting!

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    1. Jac, the weather was quite perfect that day. Not too hot but sunny.

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