Sunday, April 26, 2015

The sleep

Oh dear, nothing written for tomorrow, it is late, and I have to be up early. It has been a busy weekend. Here is something unfinished.

It is probably because I am getting on a bit, I don't sleep very well. My preference would be in bed by 11pm and up at 7am. Work makes this impossible. Regardless, I sleep six to seven hours and I am then awake. The thought of going to bed at say 10pm and sleeping until 9am is delicious, but impossible for me. Bed by 10 will mean I am awake at about 5, and that is often right for work. R can do exactly what I can't do and then have a nap in the afternoon as well.

In Asian countries people don't seem to get a lot of unbroken sleep, but nap often. Maybe it is the same in Spain, Italy and South American countries where siesta is a tradition. But really, dining later than 8pm is beyond the pale. Speaking of dining, some people in England still do the tea, main meal, at 5pm and then have a supper of sandwiches at say 9 or 10pm.

In Malaysia we witnessed what would be almost classed as child abuse here, with children, including toddlers, wide awake at 11pm on a week night at the Genting Highlands casino complex.

East is east and west is west and never the twain will meet. Well, so far as sleeping goes, probably not.

Please tell me about your sleeping habits. I know EC gets up early, but what time does she go to bed and is it a sound sleep? River often has disturbed sleep caused by her Angel? A tweet can come from Fen very late at night or very early in the morning. Fen, do you get good sleep?

45 comments:

  1. Andrew, I usually go to bed at 11p.m. but getr up at 6a.m. Sometimes /I sleep til 6.30 am. During my summer and winter hioliday I tak a nap about 2p.m. for a half an hour or 1 hour. It isa a great possibility...

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    1. Gosia, that is not too bad. You get good exercise too. I can't nap in the day.

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  2. I wish I was a better sleeper but as I get older I have reverted to defiant teenager behaviour. I won't go to bed unless I am tired. I nap in the afternoon after school and love the weekends for catchup sleep.

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    1. Carol I rather like your defiance but I must get good sleep as I can't afford to be dozy at work.

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  3. Our other halves are similar. I am an early bedder, always before10PM. Up at 6.30AM. Clive to bed a little later up at 6.15AM on the dot thanks to his navy heritage. He likes a mid afternoon nap. I hate to nap as I get ratty with a short nap.

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    1. Craig, hopefully Grace won't read this and read into it, but I am the same. I wake disoriented and crabby if I fall into a proper sleep during the day, whereas R wakes bright as a button and very refreshed.

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  4. I am a woeful sleeper. Two or three hours at a time. Often less. There is a reason that many cultures have used sleep deprivation as a torture. It is.

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    1. EC, I kind of thought that might be the case. Occasionally I have a non sleeping night and it must be horrible to go through that often.

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  5. On Bridge nights 11.30pm to midnight is the earliest bedtime, otherwise around 10pm is the go.

    I rise at 5.50am every morning.

    It is not total sleep though, I usually have a couple of toilet runs during the night and I toss and turn through the night like a rotisserie.

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    1. Rise at 5.50 Victor? So readable. Toilet, tea or coffee made and listen to the 6am news. I leave out the injudicious thoughts that come to my mind about rotisseries.

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  6. Gosia and I are similar.

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    1. Susie, it is not a lot of sleep, but adequate, I think.

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  7. I try to be in bed by 10:30 p.m. or 11:00 and used to be up by 6:30 a.m. or 7:00 a.m. latest. But nowadays, without my self appointed job, I fudge my sleep, and often read late in bed, or I am awakened far too early by my senile deaf cat tapping and tromping on my face. then I have to nap later in the day. I cannot function unless I get at least 7 hours.

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    1. Seven hours seems to be quite common Strayer, considerably less than our ancestors generally had. Yes, I remember the video of your cat waking you.

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    2. Our ancestors slept better and longer because of the hard physical work they did, out on the farm maybe and all the work involved in keeping a house without modern appliances etc. They rose with the sun and went to bed when it was dark, after an hour or so reading or darning socks or whatever. They would have been physically tired out which leads to good sleep.

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  8. I thought Spain did it exactly the right way! Work till lunchtime, sleep for a few hours, work till 8 PM, then a later dinner. You still get the mandatory 8 hours sleep a night, but not in one sitting.

    In Israel it was similar but work was in one lot, not two. Everyone started work or school VERY early, had the Big Meal of the day cooked at work or in nearby cafes, and finished by 3.30 PM. In time to pick the children from school. Dinner was the lightest meal of all.

    Spouse and I eat dinner at 7.30 PM and by the time we have cleaned up, watched tv and done any preparation for the next day... it is midnight. I sleep well until the alarm wakes me at 8 am!

    But Spain would suit me well :)

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    1. Hels, Israel is as it used to be here before my time. The main meal at lunch time and a light meal at night. It is probably better, health wise. I can't say the Spanish way is right, just different. I don't actually like staying up late now. Midnight until 8am is pretty good sleep. I would rather like that.

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  9. Bedtime between 11 and 12, alarm either 6.15 or 7.15 weekdays, none at weekends. Sleep interrupted as I have a few beers every night and they're not all through by bedtime. Have to force myself to stay in bed after about 8 at weekends to avoid disturbing others. I can't, as a rule, just 'get up and go' - must have my cuppa and read yesterday's newspaper so it's 90 minutes or so after getting out of bed that I'm ready to face the world. The desire to nap occasionally catches me but usually in an inappropriate place (train, usually, warm and with a gentle rocking motion) so I have to fight it or risk ending up in Werribee.

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    1. Chris, another one for seven hours. I sleep very badly without some wine in the evening. A bit too much and I will be wide awake at 3am. Way too much and I will sleep too soundly and wake up with neck or back ache. Surely making tea and reading the paper won't disturb others too much. Yes, the disadvantages of train through routing, no cleaners to wake you up at Flinders Street.

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    2. I haven't tried it for years but my guess is I wouldn't sleep at all without a bit of booze - when I try to cut down I have what is known as 'fitful' sleep. So my guess is 'what the hell - have a few and sleep well'. Tea and papers, yes, but my slippers make a 'clacky' sound on the wood floor - I've bought a new pair with rubber soles, not good for the odd venture outside for a smoke but quieter when moving around. I'll see how they go.
      To be fair, I have seen that a train from Frankston arriving at FS platform 10 to go to Newport and Werribee/Williamstown is usually attended by a cleaner at Flinders Street, but as a lot of people now know about the through routing the cleaner will ignore anyone that stays put.
      Memories; in the late 1970s we lived in Burwood and when the tram was first extended beyond the original Warrigal Road terminus I found I could have a few syrups of a Friday night, fall asleep on the tram and be woken by the driver changing ends at the then new terminus at Middleborough Road, which was just one stop past mine. The walk back had a good sobering effect.
      Not so much when I moved to Boronia and snapped out of my doze as the (Hitachi) doors crashed shut at Boronia of Ferntree Gully stations - the return service from FTG or UFTG in those days was abysmal, plus I live about a kilometre from Boronia station.
      Ah! Happy youthful days!

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    3. Chris, we once lived in Burwood, Bennettswood to be precise and one of our worst public transport tips was caching the 75 home from town. We thought the journey would never end and a kid kept pressing the conductors console ticket punch the whole way. Best to get the train to Box Hill and then the bus, which we did a couple of times. We used to complain about having to change trains when we lived on the Alamein line, but we were quite spoilt for trains there. Passengers should be informed about through routing and whether a trains runs around the loop after Flinders Street and the information boards do not show this and it is bad, in my opinion.

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  10. No, I'm a terrible sleeper and always have been. Ideally I'd be in bed by 10.30pm with a solid 8 hours. Reality is I wake up at least 2-3 times a night and I am lucky if I sleep past about 5am. I've given up battling with it, it is what it is and nothing I do changes this.

    I do love a Nanna nap on weekends though.

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    1. Fen, one thing I have learnt as I have become older, it is not only pointless, but unproductive to worry about not sleeping. I hope you don't wake up drooling after your Nanna nap.

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  11. Sleep here is much less disturbed now that Angel and I have worked out a system. I keep him awake more in the afternoon if I can, then we both go to bed at 9.30-10pm with the room almost totally black. I fall asleep quickly, always have, so when he is ready for breakfast at 3.30-4am I've had enough sleep so I'm not cranky about having to get up. I put out his food and tell him I'm going back to sleep and then I do, while he eats and then goes out to the back porch for a while.
    I've given up having coffee after 5pm, so I'm not up going to the toilet at night, and I'm not eating after 7.30pm.
    6-7 hours is actually a good length of sleep, so you are doing well, you just want to be able to sleep longer even though your body doesn't need it. I think you don't need to worry unless you are waking up often in that 6-7 hours. Perhaps you feel you don't sleep deeply enough and your sleep isn't refreshing you? Try turning off all electronic devices an hour before your bedtime, that includes TV. Read a book.

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    1. Angel is undergoing some discipline. Good to hear. No connection between not having coffee after five and hence not going to the toilet at night and your recent medical issue? I have no issues going to sleep, devices or not, and I do often read for ten minutes once in bed.

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    2. No connection at all and not going to the toilet during the night is actually normal, people are supposed to be able to sleep without getting up during the night. It's the late night drinks that cause the trouble there, unless one has some kind of medical issue, like men with enlarged prostrates etc.
      Anyway, my issue seems to have resolved itself, nothing was found to be wrong and it hasn't happened again.

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  12. I have heard about the afternoon siestas.
    When working one always needs a fairly good routine. When retired one can please ones self...
    I have always slept well and always since an adult gone to bed when tired, (11.30pm-2am) up when awake expect for special occasions up early but not to bed early, only when tired. Have been known to fall asleep on a rare occasion during the day. It appears I sleep through anything, including loud snoring, lights on or whatever.
    As soon as my head hits the pillow I'm asleep, according to my husband.
    Yes, I'm lucky! (So far)

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    1. WA, only the innocent sleep that well and I find it hard to believe you are so innocent :-P

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    2. I'm definitely not innocent. As I mentioned, I'm lucky! (So far) and it's 1.22am :)

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  13. I sleep much better since I have retired...less stress. We go to bed about 11 and up at any time, usually about 6:00 in summer and 7:00 in winter. We both like to read until our eyes close and the book falls out of bed. Then it is straight to sleep. You don't need as much sleep as you get older. ^ to 7 hours is plenty.

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    1. Diane, that is quite true, you don't need as much sleep when you are older and nor do you sleep as well, I find. Yes, I can well imagine sleeping better when I stop working.

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  14. Hi Andrew, greetings from Malaysia. After I've retired, I usually sleep around 11 pm or later and wakes up about 6 am for my morning walk. I do not take afternoon nap unless I am very, very sleepy.
    http://chingchailah.blogspot.com/

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    1. Greetings Nancy. You seem to be like everyone else here, seven hours sleep.

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  15. Once I'm out, I'm way out. You could detonate bombs next to my bedroom, it would not wake me. This makes waking me up somewhat difficult.

    Plus, once my sleep pattern is thrown out for any reason, it takes me ages to get it back on track.

    One of our kitties is like a sandbag when she sleeps and if she chooses to sandbag somewhere near my legs, that tends to wake me when I am trying to turn over..

    I do have a tendency to sleepwalk and once when we went to Hawaii, the first night the other half was woken up by me opening the door to the room. He'd put the little latch thing across so I couldn't actually go anywhere, and I am not sure where I was going to go, perhaps shopping because the shopping there is amazing.

    So every night after that, he would put things in front of the door so there was no way I could sleepwalk out. :)

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    1. Snoskred, as a shift worker, I quickly adapt to time variations, which is quite helpful when travelling into very different time zones. Sleepwalking is weird. I don't think I have ever been so inclined. Animals on the the bed disturb me less than a person in the bed.

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    2. Angel is a sandbag, a large one, so turning over is impossible which is causing my early morning back pain and stiffness to increase. Makes me wish I had a bigger bed. A single is no size to be sharing, even with a cat.

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    3. River, single bed? One person needs a double bed. Two people need a king sized. Three people need two separate beds.

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    4. Years ago I gave my double bed to my son after his second hand waterbed sprung its fifth leak. I bought a single for myself as that was what I could afford. Now, in this much smaller bedroom, it's all I have room for. I dislike it, but put up with it.

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  16. Sleep, that thing I love which doesn't love me back.

    The GS works nights and sleeps during the day, so I follow the same schedule. Parkinson's, however, makes sleeping 'interesting'; because it does fun bladder stuff I'm usually up every 2 hours for a bathroom run. And, since stiffness and difficulty moving in bed are another perk of Parkinson's, I wake up at least partially when moving in bed... which is usually painful as well. I generally last 4-5 hours during the day, with another session of similar length at night. I'm always tired, and sometimes my body says "Yup, had enough of this" and I sleep so deeply it's nearly impossible to wake me. I know.. *sob,sob* ;-)

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    1. Jac, I'm afraid I really don't want to swap with you, no matter how deeply you sleep. It must be very difficult for you at times, well most of the time.

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  17. It takes me about an hour to get to bed, what with the teeth cleaning, arthritis cream in various places, making sure food is for the Bear, take pills after making sure the bottle of water is full because I hate waking up for more pain killers and there's no water. When I finally settle, I wait for the creeping up the bed of the white blob and when he settles, I sleep. I have a dreadful habit of going to sleep in my chair, must be a charming sight with a book on my face or more often than not, drool.

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    1. Jah Teh, I can't sit in a lounge chair and watch tv at night for long. I am soon sound asleep. Better that I am here at the computer and being active.

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  18. I'm the opposite at the moment to everybody else commenting. I don't get home from until 6:30am, and don't drift off until around 8am. Then I'll wake around 4:30pm.

    Only been doing it a couple of months but it was hard getting into the routine - initially even after a couple of weeks I'd collapse into bed when I got home, but never get more than about 5 or 6 hours of sleep. Then on my free days, I'd collapse about 2:30am and not emerge until the same time in the afternoon, repaying the debt of the week.

    It is quite a strange feeling at 7 in the morning, seeing the new day beginning around you and thinking that you're not feeling tired yet and might as well go enjoy it, only to fall asleep gradually an hour later.

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  19. While I work shift work, it is not to that extreme and I don't think I could do it. People who work these sort of hours should be very well compensated and I hope you are. The only thing worse would be rotating shifts including these hours.

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