Tuesday, April 14, 2015

A victim of marketing

Present society always seem to need someone to blame. When bad things happen, it is never a person's fault, something that came about because of their actions, but another person's doing.

I spend a lot of time on the internet. Is is too much time? I don't know. I am certainly addicted to the net and would struggle in life without it now. There is nothing I don't get done though, with two exceptions, concentrated television watching and book reading. I haven't done badly so far this year with about three proper books read and three electronic books, but in days before the net, it might have been three books a week and a lot of newspapers and magazines. Of course who should I blame for not reading as much? You, dear reader, you. You write interesting things with nice photos and at times I am sent off on mad internet hunts. You also encourage me to write and take nice photos, which also takes time. It is all your fault! So there!

I save reading paper books for at home but when at work or when travelling, I like the convenience and lightness of the Kindle, but I have become a victim of marketing. Remember the story about the Gillette razor blades? Give them the holder but charge them for the blades. A more recent version has been printers, where you pay more for the ink cartridges than you do the printer.

How does this relate to reading books on a Kindle? Simple, give the customer the first of five or six books in a series for free and if it is a good book, the company is almost guaranteed you will pay for the rest, which is exactly what I am half way through doing.

The book, or books? I don't know how widely she and her works are known. The author is Irish born Martha Long and the books are auto biographical, beginning with her appalling childhood where such mistreatment should have seen her parents locked up. Ma, He Sold Me For A Few Cigarettes was a harrowing read. The book was among various free books offered by Amazon. I did not realise then that it was a series of five.

It was quite some time before I downloaded the second book in the series and had to pay for it.. Ma, I’m Gettin Meself a New Mammy focused on her teenage years in a convent, having been sent there by the authorities. The third, Ma, It’s a Cold Aul Night an I’m Lookin for a Bed, sees her depart from the convent at the age of sixteen and try to make her way on her own and find work in a very harsh city of Dublin.

What I am about to buy now is Ma, Now I'm Goin Up in the World, with still to come, Ma, I’ve Got Meself Locked Up in the Mad House; Ma, I've Reached for the Moon an I'm Hittin the Stars and
Ma, Jackser's Dying Alone.

Ok, that is seven books in the series. I am curious if any of you book readers out there know of these books.  Obviously I am enjoying them if I am paying for them, though I doubt I would pay if they were paperback prices.
Ma, Jackser's Dyin Alone

31 comments:

  1. Andrew, I love gadgets too, And now I prefer e-boosk. Time has changed definitely/.

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    1. Gosia, now people are starting to read books on tablets.

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  2. Hi Andrew, I love to read but still prefer the real thing and have no desire to change. I haven't read much lately either but I think that's because there's simply not enough written today that's worthwhile. I did hear of a book that sounds excellent on Charlie Rose today - "A Curious Mind" by Brian Grazer. I think I'll actually buy the book come pay day; that's how intrigued I am.

    Anyway, I am well, cured, and feeling a bit better each day. You sound good. And no, I have not heard of this series before. :)

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    1. Rubye :) I have heard of that book. I think the author was recently here promoting the book. Pleased to hear you are doing well.

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  3. I am a reading addict. Mostly 'real' books because I like the feel and the smell.
    I have seen this series, but have avoided them. I suspect they would make my heart hurt. I know they would make my head hurt. And would be to close to some of the most difficult calls I face at Lifeline.

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    1. EC, yes head and heart reading material. I am hoping things will get better for her as I progress through the books.

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  4. I love my ebook reader. I don't know of those books, though. :)

    I read an absolutely incredible book this week which I am writing a review about, trouble is I do not think there are words to do it enough justice, and I am not foolish enough to think if there were, that I could be able to string them together in a way that truly speaks to how amazing the book was.

    With that said, I have been working on saying the things that really need to be said to family members and sending very awesome cards to them with those things inside. :)

    So in the spirit of saying things I want to say, I am deeply glad I found your blog and I find your posts extremely fascinating, with *and* without photos. :)

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    1. Snoskred, how kind. I used to read serious books too, not just novels and autobiographies, but now my serious reading is done on the net and probably in a more superficial manner. I look forward to reading your review.

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  5. I am ashamed to say I do not read anywhere near as much as I used to for reasons similar to your own. I am not familiar with the series of books you are reading. Trying to avoid harrowing tales as it doesn't help my lack of sleep!

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    1. Fun60, don't be ashamed. Think of all the wonderful interaction you have people now and think of the things that you have learnt through research for blog writing.

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  6. I don't know what you're on about, saying the Internet is a distraction..... oooo, shiny!
    Haven't read that series, as E.C. said, don't know that I'd be able to; it sounds as though it would hit a bit close to home.
    I love both my Kindle, and 'real' books; as a voracious reader, they both get heavy use.

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    1. I regret to say my reply is tbe same as fun's
      Hey ho

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    2. Jac, it is the other way around. Life is a distraction from the internet. Yes, it is a harrowing read at times.

      John, it would be hard to imagine your life without the internet, surely. No need to feel guilt.

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  7. This is a tough one. I love the Internet yet I also love the paper version of books. I make a living from the Internet yet sometimes I wish I used it a little bit less. Striving for balance!

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    1. Julie, when I am no longer working, I think I will have restrict my internet use. There is always just one more thing to look at, to read, to check.

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  8. Yes yes and yes.
    With an actual book, it slides off the bed when the reader falls asleep. What happens with a Kindle?
    That series sounds interesting and her titles are terrific but as I am not recovered from the other 'harrowing' read - Black Beauty - yet, I would need 10 minutes afterwards, online at RichKidsOfInstagram to cleanse all the bleak from my mind.
    Rejoice for me please that after a zillionty moves (five of them were actual purchases) I have purchased my 6th and final home, the DeathNest and will go west of Hamilton Victoria this week to where my pioneer ancestors settled in the early 1850's. I am experiencing a Spirit Of Place.

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    1. Ann, the Kindle also falls off the bed. I wish my glasses would too and not get bent arms after having been slept on. Black Beauty was very sad. Are you still looking at that Rich Kids site? What terrific news. You are finally moving after such delays. DeathNest, haha, grim thought but probably true.

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    2. Ann, I am so very happy for you. Pictures please. And I hope your DeathNest (love that name) is very, very comfortable - and critter filled.

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    3. I remember reading Black Beauty (by Anna Sewell I think) when I was 8 or 9, before I ever knew the word harrowing. I do know that back then I wanted to smack those people who treated their horses badly.
      Of course if you're talking about a different Black Beauty, then I'll have to look that up.

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  9. I don't know of those books. But I am reading only history books and journals these days, and I miss novels desperately. Way to go, Kindle!

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    1. Hels, like all things, you need balance. Read something lighter occasionally.

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  10. Love my Kindle. Like the Internet, it's one of my many hobbies. Always reading and learning, just don't need the reference books anymore, do we. No matter where we go, it's look it up on the Internet. We can't carry all our reference books like we can with our phone, tablet or Kindle.

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    1. WA, so true and increasingly I am using my phone when out to access information. I still like paper maps though, not that I use them often.

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  11. I've never heard of these books, but I'll make a note of the author and titles. Maybe my local library can get them for me. Unless they're only for kindle.

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    1. Certainly they are paperbacks too River. They were very popular in the US, I believe.

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  12. I'm alternating these days. One kindle story, then one real book.

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    1. Good way to do it River, with the Kindle for the bus I expect.

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  13. Hello Andrew,

    Much as we are wedded to our computers, we cannot be without a real book to read. No Kindle in this household. We love the sensation of actually holding a book, turning the pages and immersing oneself completely in character and plot.

    We have not heard of the books you mention but it is often the case these days that we are first introduced to a possible new book to read by the Internet in some form or another. So, yes, we are victims of marketing too!

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    1. I know JayLa. There is nothing quite like page turning, especially if is a fine book. It sounds to me as if you may become anti social internet monsters. Opera, ballet and art don't translate well to the internet though.

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  14. What would we do without the internet. For sure, it can be addictive but it's so helpful and informative too. I found my employer on the web 7 years ago - no job advertised, I simply emailed them and told them that they really should employ me! I also found our current home on the web (and our previous one in France). Haven't heard of this author - I'll check her out. I'm an occasional reader - reading (slowly) Jo Nesbo at the moment.

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    1. Craig, I saw mention of you on internet job on JayLa's website and thought it was quite interesting. The 'net is terrific for looking at houses etc, but like you, I also need to see the real thing, kick the tyers so to speak.

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