Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Sydney Day 5 Sunday

Sunday was the day for St Patrick's Day celebrations, I think with a parade ending in Hyde Park with festivities. I saw far too many amusements for children being set up to like the idea of attending. We will go to La Perouse by bus, but because of the parade, the bus routes have temporarily changed. It was too hard to work this out and where they may stop as well, so we caught the train to Central and the bus from there. Trams used to travel to La Perouse via two different routes and current buses follow the routes with some variations. From Central we travelled along Albion Street, which was quite interesting, then along Anzac Parade and via Bunnerong Road to La Perouse.

A couple of photos of Central Station.



An arriving tram.


We left the bus at the terminus and were confronted with a howling wind. As we strolled towards the sea, down came a heavy shower and we took refuge in a shopfront. In spite of the weather I could see La Perouse had potential as a very nice spot. Across the water is the container crane infrastructure of  Port Botany and fuel storage tanks.


Here is a photo by and of Port Botany. La Perouse can be seen in the distance under the gap between 'Port' and 'of'.



The Boat House looked interesting so we popped in. In such weather the deck was of course closed. We had a mind to eat, but was another one of those places to take mum for lunch on her birthday and booked out. We did have coffee there in a separate area.


Laperouse was French explorer and the local museum exhibitions are mostly related to him. It was reasonably interesting and I learnt quite a lot about him. The building had been housing for cable station staff, a Salvation Army refuge for women and children and as housing for nurses and soldiers. The anchor was retrieved from the see floor where the two Laperouse expedition ships sank off Solomon Islands.


I liked this map showing the discovered and undiscovered Australian coastline.


The tram to La Perouose turned to go back to the city using a loop. Up until recently, the replacement bus service used the loop but I understand it has gone and the bus now turns around at a roundabout. I believe it was a smaller circle than the road around the central island. What is the island off the shore?


When we were in the bus on the way to La Perouse, I momentarily pondered as we travelled past relatively new areas why a tram would run all this way, into what then was probably sandy scrub. It was of course as many Sydney trams lines did, to take people to the beach. The beach on a nice day here would be very pleasant. It is said to be shallow and quite safe, but it really did not feel like that on this bad weather day.


From your left, the museum, the sentry tower and the war memorial.


The island is called Bare Island and although you can use the bridge and clamber around below the walls, an entry fee must be paid to go within the walls.


The waves were very strong, crashing onto the rocks a cresting in the open. Above the water line you can see the yellow of a kite surfer. They went back and forward across the rough water. They must have been very skilled.


Sentry tower or as it is called, Barrack Tower.


The couple had walked from Bare Island to take some photos on the leeward side of the tower.


There is a long tradition of snake shows at La Perouse and they still happen every Sunday.



I not like and kept my distance from the fence. This is a red bellied black snake. It was shown to us that the underside of the snake is more crimson than red.


We only saw the 1.30 show because the scheduled bus did not turn up to depart on time. A bus arrived, the driver got out, locked the bus and disappeared. We stayed in the shelter out of the wind and the bus took off, so we had to wait for the next one, which was equally due no doubt to bus diversions in the city and congestion.


The L94 took us back to Oxford Street using Anzac Parade all the way. A short spur line used to run off the road into Long Bay Gaol, but now the gaol is right up to the road and nothing more than a bustop is needed. We then caught the 380 to Bondi Junction and had a nice lunch in The Cosmopolitan Coffee Lounge. Time to head back to the hotel but where on earth is bus stand N? Signs pointed up, down and all around and we could not find it. Eventually we discovered it outside the transport interchange. The next stop at the beginning of Oxford Street would have been the sensible place to catch the bus, had we known. Trams once ran along Oxford Street and are remembered by this faux track along the mall.


Somewhere along the way we sighted the harbour. In the evening we dined at long established Tandoori Palace. Tomorrow will be our last full day in Sydney. Where did we go? Another bus along an old tram route to arguably Sydney's best beach.

24 comments:

  1. The limited stops 333 bus (Bondi Beach - Circular Quay) does not use that first stop in Oxford Street that you refer to but you would have been able to pick up the 380 and also the 378 (Bronte - Railway Square) there.

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    1. Victor, we never deliberately avoided the 333 and saw plenty of them, but one never turned when we were catching the bus anywhere.

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  2. This is a most interesting day Andrew. Beaches, an island, a snake show. The boathouse where you didn't get lunch looks lovely and the beach below it looks peaceful. Shame about the weather, but cresting and crashing waves make it worth it.

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    1. River the Boat House would have been a great place to be, out on the deck on a fine day. I like crashing waves too.

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  3. My brother in law took us to see La Perouse yonks ago, a bit of historical bliss in a city that was rapidly developing its own modernity. But the idea of building an island fort to defend Sydney from invading Russians or South Americans or Germans was a bit over-ambitious.

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    1. Hels, Melbourne wouldn't be so silly. We would not build anything at Port Phillip Heads, would we.

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  4. It does look like a fine day. Except for the red-belly. In one of our homes a red-bellied black lived under the front steps. For about nine months of the year (to be sure) I only used the back door.
    I do like the crashing waves though. And wish that kite-surfing had been around in my younger, more agile, braver days.

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    1. EC, if it is the weather you mean, it did improve while we were there. The snake man applied his 30+ before the show. I will differ with you. If kite surfing was around when I was young, I would still not bother with it, nevertheless, the skill involved does impress me. I guess you don't see too much in your town.

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  5. I'm in bliss, just looking at the photos; it's been far too long since I've heard crashing waves and felt the spray on my face. What an (almost) perfect day!

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    1. Jacqueline, I can't even work out what country or continent you live in, let alone how far from the sea you are. You talk English but seem to be in the US, yet I see Scotland pop up at times. I just had a brainwave, check your first post, which may be introductory. It wasn't helpful but I am pleased you did not stick to recipes.

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  6. I'm trying to remember my Sydney geography - is Botany Bay out by the airport? Beautiful rugged views. But that snake would have had me running for cover!

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    1. It is Craig. People were pressed up to the low fence to watch the snake show. Not me. I stood back.

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  7. Snake shows?
    Im off to google those

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    1. John, include spiders, sharks, drop bears, hoop snakes and spitfire caterpillars in your research.

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  8. Interesting map...seems you had a busy day.

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    1. WA, it was a good day and we weren't tired and back at our hotel by 3.00, which is what we like to do.

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  9. You sure packed a lot into your days in Sydney Andrew.. Snakes would have been a no-no pour moi, they super creep me out Bondi Beach would be in :) Can't believe it's only two weeks till I have to face my fears once more and board a plane :(

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    1. Grace, I refuse to go to Bondi Beach until Gladys builds a train line to it. It is horrible travelling on overcrowded buses. Yesterday's events won't be reassuring you. You'll be fine.

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  10. Replies
    1. Thank you Audrey. My French is very poor, sorry.

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  11. The wedding photo is really nice.

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    1. Susie, I felt a bit sorry for them because of the bad weather, but that's what happens when you have an outside wedding.

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  12. Snakes, huh? I thought of you today when I found a 'solar snake scarer' in a camping shop! It looked like an outdoor solar light that you stick in the ground to light up the driveway or whatever. The manufacturer recommended at least two for best operation - natch!! Now that it's turning cold, I wasn't so tempted to buy one (or two) - maybe in spring!

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    1. They may stop snakes sneaking into your tent looking for the warmth of a mammal for the night. Oh, I just gave myself the shivers.

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