Monday, December 15, 2014

Communication Breakdown

It was going to be a dinner for our Fijian Indian friend's birthday and then it turned into a catch up for friends pre Christmas. For some reason R ended up with the task of booking a table at The Dick, the Dick Whittington Tavern. (all Dick jokes and puns were just deleted)

The number of people coming grew. We started with eight and every couple of days the number would increase. R called the hotel each time and increased booking number. After a stressful Mother day for him, where he takes Mother out to appointments and shopping, two more requested to come to the dinner. When the telephone failed R, the air became rather blue. I suppose I must have posted about it at the time when we bought the phone and it wasn't a bad choice. But it is getting on a bit and the batteries go flat quickly when it is in use for a while. R has the second handset in a cradle in his bedroom, but he never uses it. Handsets were swapped over when the batteries went very low on one handset. ABI Brother complained earlier in the week he could not hear me properly on the phone. The last straw was when R was talking to the Dick, already stressed, and the phone cut out. He did not throw it, but was probably justified in doing so. He ranted for a bit and then used his mobile to complete the updated booking to 18 people.

Ok, the phone must be more than five years old. It was cheap but worked well enough. Let me look online. I like the look of this one. Of course my darling, you can have a new phone, as long as you don't want a second handset that you will never use. Go and get it. The next morning he did. The only reason we keep the landline is it does not cost us anything to have.

Apart from it only ringing six times before the answer system kicks in, it is great. It came with a detailed manual but I haven't had to use the manual as menu system is just so instinctive. It Bluetoothed our mobile phone books and downloaded them, but the system for using that is a bit clunky and so I manually entered our call list of about 25 phone numbers. As well as ringing it speaks who the call is coming from, such as me, Andrew calling, Andrew calling. If the person is not in the phone's system, the voice reads out the number. It has a good speed dial system of nine numbers.

I think we can use our mobiles through the phone to make calls using Bluetooth, but as I always say, take from technology what you want and need and don't worry about the rest.

The old phone. If you are wondering what the dangling cord is, its the handset cord for the building's front door intercom system.


Buried in depths of my wardrobe, this old beast was dragged out for temporary use. It was once white. Plastic doesn't age well. Bring back the Bakelite I say. The buttons at the bottom were for pre-programmed numbers. I wonder who's numbers we had there some twenty plus years ago? I was tempted to press them to see who would answer, but then instantly became afraid, very afraid of ghosts of the past. They probably would not work anyway as an extra digit has been added to Australia phone numbers since this one was in use. Later edit: I've given this further thought and I think this phone was left behind at our rental flat and we kept it when we cleaning the flat up before we sold it. What happened to our original white table phone?


We are quite happy with the new phone, with the exception of it only ringing six times before the answer machine starts and we are not keen on the heavy American accent of the voice.

22 comments:

  1. One of the phones connected to the landline is just that monstrosity. Still it has come in handy before now when more 'advanced' technology has stuffed out.
    I hope the dinner was wonderful - and well worth the effort in co-ordinating it.

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    1. EC, the old phones are handy if there is a blackout but apparently our new one will work for some time on batteries. Dinner was rather good.

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  2. Andrew, definitely your new phone looks fantastic i believe it wiil be a great device,

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    1. I hope it serves us well, Gosia. Always fun to play with a new toy.

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  3. I don't like your old black phone, I think it is ugly. We had one of the cream ones in the house we had to sell, it was mounted on the wall at the edge of the kitchen by the family room, I think I used it once in the three years we were there. I'm not a phone person. After we moved, (and moved and moved and ...) we just used whatever phone was available in the rentals, until in my previous home I bought my own phone again, with answering machine and second handset. I still have it, on the shelf behind me, but it isn't connected, I didn't see the point in paying monthly fees to telstra when I have my mobile and hardly use that either.
    Your new phone looks very nice.

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    1. River, we thought it looked nice at the time, but it looks old fashioned now. Yes, as I said, it doesn't cost us anything for the line and most calls are free, well built in to the overall package.

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  4. PS, can you record your own answering message instead of the American accent one?

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    1. I think I might dislike hearing my own voice more than the heavy accent.

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    2. Get Little Jo to do it, but tell her what to say. Or let her make something up. (*~*)

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    3. Not a bad idea River.

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  5. They don't last long do they? Ours are crackly and go flat but they are not that old but then years just zip past nowadays.. Im sure you can change the number of rings. I have done that. Read the manual for the answering machine part. Hope your complicated dinner went well.

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    1. Diane, six rings is the maximum. It was set on two, which is absurd. I will look at the manual, as there might be other voices, like some sat navs have.

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  6. Oh my...i get funny when i hear an American voice recording, don't like that, because we are Australian.
    We don't use our home phone, it's just there incase plus need the line for ADSL..

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    1. WA, you could go naked. Naked adsl without the phone connection. Our last answer machine message was by an Englishwoman. It wasn't too bad, but nice Australian is best.

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  7. I turned my answering machine off yesterday, it's pointless. Only my Nan has the number here and if it's not her it's stupid telemarketing overseas idiots who don't care about the Do Not Call register.

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    1. Fen, we are in a transitional phase. I expect no one will have a land line in ten years time. I had a 'the government owes you $7000 from unclaimed money' call yesterday.

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    2. Fen

      I can barely be polite to overseas idiots who don't care about the Do Not Call register. Or have never heard of it. But one warning... it only applies to commercial operations. It does not block out charities or political parties.

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    3. Hels, yes it is so annoying. Charities and political parties should be included.

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  8. "The only reason we keep the landline is it does not cost us anything to have". How did you manage that?

    I still have to pay the 3 monthly rentals, so it is a good question for me to think about as well. Do I really need a landline? Do I ever use it? Does anyone use it to ring us?

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    1. Hels, it is a bundle that includes our cable internet and our mobile phones, and some free Foxtel, which we don't use.

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  9. I think you may be right Andrew, I know as soon as the NBN line goes in our area we will definitely do away with home line!

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    1. Grace, and even if people don't want to pay for a mobile call, just ringing the phone is enough to know the person wants to get in touch with you.

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