Thursday, November 20, 2014

Vote early, vote often

Life at The Highrise has changed somewhat since R retired, not in a good or bad way, but just different. Mostly he is home when I have a weekday off and so I am not as free to just go off on my own and roam the streets with camera in hand. Sometimes he may have something to do on that day and so I still get out on my own, but often he now comes with me and it is nice to have the company, but it does dictate some of what I do, especially taking photos. I know he gets exasperated with the photo taking and I am afraid I take rather less photos and spend less time getting the angle or the light correct. Who said 'really, I had not noticed that you do'?

I had two things I wanted to do, which turned into three things. R had to be home by 1.30pm to get ready to go to his volunteer place AGM. We fitted it all in and lunch as well.

We caught the tram to Linden Gallery in Acland Street and saw its annual post card exhibition which is small works by I should think unknown artists. The prices ranged from $35 to $650 and the price was no indication to me as to whether I liked the work or not. I really liked a couple of $35 pieces but they had already been sold.

I found myself reading through this party shopping list and initially noticed nothing untoward. I read the very apt title of the work last.


We left by tram to Hotham Street and then caught a bus to High Street and walked through the very pleasant Victoria Gardens. Photos another day. It was a park I had never seen although passed it by so many times. Another thing ticked off the infinite list. We headed towards Chapel Street through Prahran's back streets and came out opposite the ever popular Tran Bakery. The wait wasn't too long and we sat outside to eat our salad rolls and drink coffee as the parade of Chapel Streets types strolled or walked briskly by. The noise of cars, trucks and trams bothered us not at all.

Now I had the foresight to look up before we went out as to where we could cast an early vote in our new State electorate of Prahran and it was just short distance away in Chapel Street. I often have to work on election day, but this year I have not even checked and you are no longer asked a reason for you wanting to vote early, so vote we did.

The sitting Liberal Party member, Clem Newton-Brown was in attendance and he is a pleasant enough fellow. I thought of reminding him he made a comment or two on my blog while we were having a brief chat, but I decided not to. We also had a chat to the Labor candidate, Neil Pharaoh. I don't know if the Greens candidate Sam Hibbins was there or not. I didn't see him. We were home just after 1pm.

I will call the seat now. Newton-Brown will be re-elected with an increased vote. He has developed a very high profile. He seems to keep his distance from the more controversial aspects of the Liberal Government. He works hard for his electorate and is respected by many people, political foe or not. Labor will not do so well because many of its traditional voters will vote Green, although probably select Labor as their second preference in the lower house. 

I think we have done quite well in the looks department of our candidates.   In no special order the main candidates for the state seat of Prahran:

Green's Sam Hibbins.


Labor's Neil Pharaoh.


Liberal's Clem Newton-Brown.


It is not relevant to how I voted, by while writing this and getting names correct, I note Sam Hibbins is a local councillor for City of Stonnington. Quell surprise. Stonnington covers some of the richest areas of Melbourne. That really surprised me. I was not so surprised to learn Neil Pharaoh is gay.

25 comments:

  1. Neil Pharaoh is the talk of the local gay Twittersphere with his good looks. Apparently he has brains to go with those looks.

    The electorate adjoining mine has Clover Moore's protege, Alex Greenwich, as its local member. He too is a good looking gay man and he is doing very well as an Independent member of state Parliament.

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    1. Victor, shows how out of touch I am gay Melbourne. I know more about Mr Greenwich than our local candidate.

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  2. I always vote early now. No crowds
    My partner has had himself removed from the electoral roll and doesn't vote, but I do. It is important to me.
    And you are right about the looks of your candidates. Which has to help their chances.

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    1. EC, each election I notice more and more people voting early. There probably will be queues in the future. Yes, unfortunate as it is, looks do help.

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  3. Vote? We have to vote?
    Yes, I've noticed the placards and a few mailbox leaflets, but didn't notice any dates for voting printed on them. I've probably missed my chance here in Adelaide. Oh well, I'll do it next time.

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    1. Don't panic Captain Mainwaring. It is a Victorian state election. Your dedication to democracy is admirable.

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    2. Oh. I meant I've seen placards etc for our local council elections, which I have now missed and not voted for.

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  4. Andre, what about voting I always cote in the evening at my place and mostly I take part in elections.

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    1. Good to hear Gosia. In Australia we have to vote in federal elections, state elections and local government elections. If we don't, we are fined. About 90% or more do vote.

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    2. In Federal and State elections, an average of 95-7% vote accurately - the rest are overseas, in gaol, in hospital or otherwise unreachable. But note that the 95-7% are not all valid votes; it includes those who messed up the longggggggg ballot paper, either on purpose or accidentally.

      But in local government elections, the turn out is nowhere near 95%. Perhaps people don't care about their local council very much. Perhaps the candidates are too horrible to consider. Perhaps we need more woman standing.

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    3. Thanks for the stats Hels. It is better than I thought. Purpose messing is to make a point, which is fine. If you vote below the line for the upper house, you have to take great care to get it right.

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  5. Do you seriously get fined if you don't vote? Regardless, I think it's a great idea. You will never see that happen here though. The big money people wouldn't allow it.

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    1. Rubye, yes, unless you come with a valid reason for not voting. Being overseas is an acceptable excuse. I don't think you have to vote if you are over seventy. There are usually voting facilities in large hospitals. Parties will provide transport for those who have trouble getting to booths, without questioning who the person is voting for. You can vote by mail or advance vote as we did. It can be quite a social occasion to vote on the day, with polling places invariably having a sausage sizzle or perhaps a fund raising junk market.

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  6. Can related to your photo taking with R around. Same happened to me with my husband around, but, after all his pleas not to take so long taking my photo and me wanting to stop here and there, he now appreciates what I have taken. Gladly he now stops, and even asks, "Do you want to take a photo of that?". Took a long time as in a few years :)
    Elections - happy voting when the time comes.

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    1. Interesting WA. There is hope. First thing I need to do is stop him walking when I stop so that his back is not featured in every photo.

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  7. I remember when P retired, I really felt like he was invading my space for ages :) All good now though, we do our own thing and stuff together, works out fine. Does R have a camera, maybe he'll come to enjoy taking the occasional photo trip with you Andrew!

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    1. Grace, it is such a dramatic change but I expect like you, in time everyone adjusts. R is quite content with his phone camera.

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  8. $150 for the shopping list. It DOES make a funny, interesting piece of art. But $150? I wonder what they mean by "pen and wash" in the description. I understand "pen." Is "wash" where the ink smeared?!?

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    1. Mitchell, pen and wash is a term I have heard for years but not exactly known what it is. Is it when you wash over the work with barely coloured water?

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    2. I would think the wash would be done first and allowed to dry otherwise washing would cause the ink to run. Ink in those days wasn't indelible and mostly still isn't even now.

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    3. You are right River. I remember now. We did such art at school.

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    4. We also did pen and wash in school. We would draw in ink and then use a brush to create a watercolor effect. I was just being facetious about the shopping list being called pen & wash. Not very kind of me!

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    5. Actually Mitchell, I took it as a real shopping list, photographed or something like that. Pen and wash tells me it is not and just an art work.

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  9. The question is: will you be voting based on looks or policy, and are the two correlated?

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    1. Ad Rad, I would hope no one votes on looks and I don't see a connection between looks and policies really. While I say hope, I can imagine the ALP candidate might capture a few air head gay votes.

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