Saturday, November 08, 2014

A Saturday Quickie

Nothing ready to post. I am working on Sunday's post. But I can rattle this off quickly.

As you know, we took Little Jo to Luna Park. She and R were on the Ferris wheel. It paused while a couple of people got on and R and Little Jo were right in front of me. It moved up one carriage and stopped again. An Asian lad, maybe 12, maybe 14, stepped into the carriage on his own. He was overweight, but not not excessively. He wore thick glassed spectacles. He was of a plain appearance. I assume it was his grandparents at the base of the wheel waving to him. It was his wave that really attracted my attention. It was such a pathetic wave to his grandparents. There was no joy, no emotion, just the sad limp wristed wave. In the middle of what was a great day for us, I felt a sense of overwhelming sadness for the lad. He repeated the wave a couple of times, each with less emotion that the one before. His grandparents were smiling and waving at him. Meanwhile  above him, R and Little Jo were frantically waving at me still and laughing.

He could have been 'on the spectrum', as they say. That is autistic, but R has worked with disabled people for most of his life and one of my blog mates has an autistic son, who I have met, and my slightly educated instinct tells me he wasn't.

The experience had a profound impact on me and even something like three weeks later, I am still remembering with such sadness what seemed to be just a lack of a good life for him in the future. I really hope I am totally wrong in my summations and guesswork.

25 comments:

  1. Andrew, it is not comfortable situation. But your observation is very interesting you must be a sensitive man..

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  2. Those moments can haunt us can't they? A moving post. Thank you.

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    1. They can EC. Thanks. Better fix the spelling in the headline now.

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  3. Chris' nephew leo has autusm
    Chris gets very low about his future
    I think ( and I meanhis) he'll be fine

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    1. John, I expect you just do your best for them and arm them with what life skills they can manage.

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  4. That's so sad. I just saw on the news Jerry Seinfeld talking about his own autism and there really is a wide spectrum, but I think the main commonality is not knowing how to relate to or act with other people. Of course, that would also make me autistic.

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    1. Rubye, I've never watched Seinfeld, but I could hardly not be aware of him. I did not know he was autistic. I am quite sure you under rate your social skills. I think there is a difference between being autistic and can't be bloody well bothered. :-P

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    2. I fall into the can't be bothered group.

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  5. Oh dear me, maybe he really didn't want to go on the ride.

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    1. absolutely! Young teenage boys are afraid of appearing like cowards and don't want to disappoint their family and friends. But the poor chap was probably soiling his little knickers from terror.

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    2. WA, he did not seem rebellious about it but nor did he seem to really enjoying it.

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    3. Possible Hels, but he seemed relaxed, underwhelmed even.

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  6. It's possible he may have suffered a traumatic family event and his grandparents took him out to try and cheer him up.

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    1. River, again quite possible. Actually, that fits better than anything.

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  7. These people can be very intelligent, they are just different ! I was very moved by "Rainman", it was the first time I heard about this disease. If you can call it a disease. I met a German Blogger she is autistic, she can't communicate with people "life" but she loves to write me. I am very touched by that.

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    1. Gattina, that is really nice that you made the effort and that she enjoys writing to you. You have made a difference in her life.

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  8. Not seeing for myself it is difficult to judge but having worked with teenage boys for a number of years maybe it was the behaviour of one not wanting to acknowledge he just might be enjoying himself.

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  9. Could be Fun60. I think he was perhaps enjoying it. I am thinking on the run. But I saw something within him that made feel very sad for him.

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  10. That's really sad, and I can understand why you'd be haunted by it. If I was the one who saw it; I guess I'd want to imagine he was just having one bad day...rather than being severely (and chronically) lonely and depressed.

    But wishing doesn't make something true.

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    1. Dina,

      I am also haunted. 18 months ago, i saw two idiot pre-teen boys crawling from my building to the next ..... on a pipe. There was nothing to stop them crashing to the ground, 8 storeys below.

      The police never told me if the children lived or died. I am still haunted by the vision.

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    2. Dina, it wasn't just one day. It was his life. He just looked such a sad lad, which he ought not to at that age.

      Hels, sometimes it goes horribly wrong for kids testing themselves, but generally not.

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  11. There was a story there by the sounds of it Andrew, hopefully not too sad a story!

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    1. Grace, and we will never know.

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