Sunday, November 30, 2014

A Dalgety Street Dawdle Pt 1

I recalled three storey houses in Dalgety Street, St Kilda, with the lower storey below ground level. They are unusual in Melbourne. It has been many years since I have been in Dalgety Street, and then only in a car. Back then I think it was a prostitute beat, with cars cruising up and down the street every evening. The street was then blocked off mid point by the council and that was the end of the street as a place to obtain such a service.

Dalgety Street runs between Princes Street and Grey Street, parallel to the well known Fitzroy Street. I trammed to St Kilda Junction and began my walk along Pattison Street. Not much to see in this street and it looks quite shabby and neglected.


Things did improve as I neared Princes Street with what seems to be apartments at the back of the Ritz Hotel, the pub part now known as the Elephant and Wheelbarrow, popular with UK and Irish backpackers.


Around the corner into Princes Street I came face to face with this rather handsome house.


Across the road I quite liked the simple timber fretwork on the verandah. I hope the occupants are enjoying the view over  a vacant lot being used as a carpark. It won't stay that way for long and no doubt their view will blocked.


Technically correct perhaps if you want to get to Nepean Highway using St Kilda Road and Brighton Road. But really the sign is an  anachronism and should say St Kilda Road south and include the route number 3. I think the sign is very very old.


One corner of Dalgety Street.


And on the other corner is this stunning block of apartments.


It think it was late on a Saturday afternoon when I was there. The street was busy enough with pedestrians and people coming and going.


The buildings are generally very well maintained.



A former politician once remarked that you could tell which houses in a street were rented and which were owned by the occupiers. It was a tactless thing for a politician to say, but so often quite true. The centre house in this terrace looks very rented.


The verandahs on this one have been filled in with windows and it either apartments or a boarding house. I did see some of the occupants and I would suggest boarding house.


A very expensive looking terrace of houses.


A terrific apartment building.


Here we go, a house with a storey below ground level.


Another nice terrace. Boy there are some expensive houses in this street.


Below ground level at another.


More simple timber fretwork. The parking permit sign indicates that parking is a problem in the street. Not many places would have a garage or off street parking.


Neighbours had taken a break from their gardening and were having a chat over the fence. I console myself with the fact they I will never be able to afford to live in one of these places with the knowledge that they are probably very dark and gloomy inside.


And this is it, what I remember from maybe twenty five years ago, the long terrace with storeys below ground level, except as I remembered them, there were no trees or shrubs to hide them.


In Part 2, we will pop out into Grey Street.

14 comments:

  1. Andrew, this street is very interesting because there are a lot of interesting house, It is mixture of style and architecture. In my opnion is completely different from Europe. Thanks for sharing. It is very interesting to see the other corner of the world where is hot beause at my place os -2 C but luckily we don't have any snow,,.

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    1. Gosia, it is quite different to Europe. There is more land available and people looked to England for their house designs.

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  2. Thank you. I really enjoyed this wander with you. I have a leaning towards the older architecture, but would hate to live below ground. Claustrophobia? A little - but also a love of light.

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    1. EC, of course I agree, with our views, and I don't like to brag, but I don't think I could go backwards.

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  3. I have thought this many times before. But wasn't St Kilda fabulous, at least before it became a sleazy port are for sailors' brothels and cheap boarding houses. The streets were beautifully laid out and the architecture stunning.

    Well done for capturing an late 19th century city scape.

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    1. Hels, imagine living at Summerlea on Fitzroy Street. Your kitchen was tiny so mostly you went downstairs to the dining room for your meals.

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  4. Adelaide has a few houses with stories below ground level, but in all the ones I've seen, the lower level has windows and entrances closed or otherwise blocked off and in most of them the upper level is a business of some sort, usually a real estate office. There is a series of terraces in Norwood I think that has below ground level stories. I think in William Street.

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    1. Interesting River. No surprise that they are the locations you suggest.

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  5. Nice tour. The houses are great. The terrace ones, oh my, we have a few here, they do look lovely if maintained but rather small inside I would say. I somehow think some would have been built about the same time as here...but! ... Launceston was discovered and settled first :). Couldn't resist that!

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    1. WA, yes, often quite small rooms, but many of these would have modernised inside and opened up at the back. I seem to recall the person responsible for settling Launceston didn't stay too long and came over to Victoria.

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  6. Dalgaty St. has quite a mixture of architectural styles there Andrew.. you are so right about the rented property thing, it's the same here in burbs, you can always tell the rentals. I like that block of flats too, had a look of art deco about it do you think ? My son and his wife have bought a terrace in Surrey Hills, knocked the back part down and renovated, looks fabulous but what a money pit!
    P.s. thought about you when I did my post for today :)

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    1. Grace, sad but true, which spoils it for all the decent tenants. Yes, the block is very art deco. I must ask R to check it out in real estate websites he is so fond of perusing. Yes, the train, haha.

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  7. I'm a renter and I always look after my home and yard, landlords love me.

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    1. River, you would be a renter who would leave a place much better than when you moved in. At least where you now are, you have security of tenure.

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