Saturday, October 11, 2014

The war of orange and green

Later edit: My post has been thoroughly spoilt by everyone saying the green vest is yellow. I concede to popular opinion, so therefore, this post is nonsense. Nevertheless, the comments were interesting.

"Well it is the biggest mix up that you have ever seen.
My father, he was orange and my mother she was green".

So went the song from many years ago and I think I once put the song up here, but I don't think there was a video with it. What is that all about? I'll get there.

In Australia there seems to be no rhyme nor reason about the colour of high visibility vests worn on work sites and where a person may be at risk of not being seen, say a policeman directing traffic. Ha, like they direct traffic anymore. Vests may be bright orange or bright green. The use of them was somewhat lacking in Europe, I observed, but here it is overkill and seemed to be in England too.


Now in Ireland (independent) and Northern Ireland (British) Protestants were or are known as being orange and Catholics as green. There is a long history of antipathy, hostility and awful violence between the two groups and to add a personal view, shocking and well documented appalling  treatment of Catholics in Northern Ireland. So what colour high viz vests are worn there? Surely an orange high viz vest identifies you as Protestant and a green would identify you as Catholic.

My thorough research on this most important subject has led me to the conclusion that they use green, although they are described as fluoro yellow.

Does it follow, can I assume, that most people who would wear a high viz vest would do more manual type jobs? That is, that Catholics are more inclined to do such work, while the Protestants are the more managerial class? So where it may be contentious in Northern Ireland, green is the chosen colour.

Give me the power and I will sort the world's issues out with my magical clear thinking.

18 comments:

  1. Andrew, at my place road workers use orange vests but pedestrians have to use yellow since 31st of August 2014. It is a European Union law.

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    1. That clears things up Gosia, thanks.

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  2. I have never heard the vests described as green only yellow.

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    1. Fun60, I don't recall hearing them called a colour. Some do look quite yellow but some are definitely green.

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  3. All wasted on me, I'm colour blind.

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    1. Victor, I am sure you are not so blind that the two colours look the same. Green and yellow could be disputed.

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  4. This is only slightly at a tangent.

    When the VFL was young, football teams were known to prefer Protestant recruits or Catholic recruits. So if Melbourne found a likely lad from the country who was Catholic, the coach might ring a friendly coach from Richmond, for example, and ask him to give the lad a run.

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    1. Hels, I've not thought about it but I suppose Victorian country football teams were divided by religion. Melbourne teams? I expect so. Is ex Melbourne team's JG an acquaintance of yours?

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    2. Andrew

      there was no hard and fast rule. I have forgotten how it went but I have the impression that Melbourne, Hawthorn, Essendon, StKilda and Geelong tended to prefer Protestant recruits while Richmond, North Melbourne, Collingwood, Fitzroy and Footscray tended to prefer the Catholic lads. Boys raised in the city were recruited by the closest team in any case, but boys from the country came from regions that were formally allocated to the 12 clubs.

      I don't remember hearing anything about Carlton and South Melbourne.

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    3. Hels, that would be much what I thought. The really working class areas tended to be Catholic.

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  5. As far as I'm concerned those high viz vests are fluoro yellow, I've never heard anyone call them green before. We (not me) were required to wear one when in the carpark collecting trolleys for customers to use and all of them were fluoro yellow.
    I remember that song.

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    1. River, it was a good catchy song. Trolley collectors still wear high viz, but they are usually dark black, so they stand out anyway in the areas I frequent. I am thinking my post is now nonsense and the high viz is yellow, not green.

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  6. Our workers wear yellow and we car drivers have to have such a vest in our car in case of an accident.
    In Belgium, France, Italy and the other Southern Countries, they are all Catholics ! They mostly don't even know that there are other Christian religions. If I say that I am protestant, they think that I am a kind of Jehova witness, or member of a sect ! In these countries there are not even protestant churches, there are buildings which are called "temples" !
    In Germany they are half protestant and half catholics. Holland is mostly protestant and the Northern Countries too.

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    1. Well Gattina, I am surprised about having to have a high viz vest in your car. Why don't building workers in Vienna wear high viz? I knew about France and Italy being catholic but I did not know about Belgium. I am also surprised that they don't know about protestant. I did study Germany and its religious make up. Some areas are very Catholic and some areas protestant. It is not like that here in Australia. Towns could be protestant or catholic, but not areas or states.

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  7. I have only seen orange, green and yellow vests, and often wondered why certain colours are chosen for different organizations...the Police have green, those that work on the roads have orange, and I can't think who has yellow.

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    1. WA, building sites seem to be a mix of everything. Public transport workers wear orange.

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  8. Yellow.. definitely yellow, and red :)

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    1. Ok, Grace. I have made an appointment with my optometrist.

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