Thursday, October 23, 2014

Health Updates

Our Brother friend went home after his first chemo treatment. He was in pain and not comfortable at home. At his next scheduled visit he was re-admitted to hospital with failing kidneys and he was not lucid. He is now under care in the brand new Box Hill hospital. Treatments have been rethought and he may undergo radiotherapy as well. In spite of assurances from doctors that all will be well, other medical opinions are not so good. On this, I am a bit the glass is half empty. I don't have good feelings about it.

It was a couple of weeks ago when R received a text from Brighton Antique Dealer. She would not be able to attend any of my birthday functions as she fallen, stepped on a stone in her building's courtyard, and broken her femur bone. After a couple of days in hospital, she was moved to an expensive and brand new private rehabilitation hospital. We visited her last week, travelling there by tram because it was the easiest option. She is progressing well, using a walking frame to move about, but is somewhat mentally fragile. She is the antithesis of my similarly aged mother. BAD is an outgoing achiever, still running her own business, interested in the larger world, financially secure and has everything going for her. It is hard to see her struggling with a lack of confidence, as she clearly is. Her dyke daughter and the daughter's  partner are being very solicitous.  While I know them, I don't care too much for them. She should be back home by now and the bone healed within a few weeks.

It poured rain while we were at the hospital. We had coffee with BAD and she showed us her quite luxurious room. The rain stopped but we just missed a tram as we left the hospital, so instead of tramming it, we had ten minutes to get to the station before the next train. We walked briskly down the hill and made it with a minute to spare. In no time we were in the city, getting a couple of things at the shops.

It's a pretty little trip through Melbourne's expensive and leafy inner suburbs towards the city once you leave Gardiner on the Glen Waverley line. Gardiner is not the most attractive station though.


We are on our way to having two or more protective service officers at every suburban railway station from 6pm until the last train. Of course something had to be built for their comfort.  These guards come at great expense and I am not sure if it is worth the cost, especially at small and quiet stations where there is never trouble.

18 comments:

  1. Andrew, definitely cancer is serious problem and so often incurable but I hope so your friend will survive. Hope dies the last.. It is true..

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    1. Gosia, we are getting very mixed signals. He needs to be asking more questions about his treatment.

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  2. So sorry to hear your brother friend isn't doing as well as they expected. Failing kidneys doesn't sound good at all. I hop he improves enough to still get his holiday /or house move, I can't quite remember which.
    I can understand the antique dealer's loss of confidence, I had the same after my first back sprain. Once the pain was gone and I could move freely, I was afraid to do anything that might set it back. After numerous incidents of recurring pain and stiffness since then, I'm still wary of doing many things which I know will cause pain and stiffness, but I'm used to it now and often do things anyway, just modify the method of doing. BAD will be fine once she is fully mobile without walking aids.

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    1. River, his kidneys are now ok. They plan to move permanently to Thailand.

      Re back pain, I heard on ABC RN Health Report that the worst thing you can do with back pain is to modify the way your move and do things to protect your back. Obviously you need to be sensible about it though.

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    2. Yes, that's part of the problem now. The original person I saw with the first sprain told me to lie flat with my feet up and do anything at all to get rid of the pain, even getting drunk if that was my method. She recommended crawling to get to toilet etc, a week later when I was more mobile she said I should pretend I had a steel rod for a spine and not to bend or twist at all, then she sent me back to work. No therapy, no exercises, no second opinion, she was the work doctor so I did what I was told. For years. I eventually learned about exercises etc and they help quite a lot, but I'll never be the same as before that first injury.

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    3. River, bad practitioner. I don't really believe in chiropractors but I do believe in physiotherapy. They do tell you to continue the exercise after the immediate pain has passed, but who among us does that.

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  3. That building for the protection officers is so 'public service', isn't it?

    Functional (but maybe not) and oh so ugly.

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    1. That one is fairly typical Victor. Some older and historic stations have boxes that better suit the surroundings. Someone laughed the other day when they learnt that Sydney trains still have guards. It might be preferable if this is the option for public safety.

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  4. Cancer is a strange thing, some people make a full recovery others do not fair so well, I hope your brothers friend is in the former group but they are few.
    BAD just needs time but going home is always a better idea.
    That funny little building on the station just looks silly.
    Merle............

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    1. Merle, yes her daughter will look after her once she is home. You are correct, the building looks silly AND cheap.

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  5. Frail old age is a shocker :(
    Sickness in a younger age is even worse :(
    If there is a God in heaven, what a ridiculous life plan She/He devised.

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    1. Hels, I guess the problem is that we just live so long now. Quality of life is important when you are old and some can have it even when very frail.

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  6. Doesn't sound too good for the brothers friend. Gosh the guards would cost heaps of money to have them at each station, and no doubt a total waste of money in some areas..but! better be safe than sorry.

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    1. WA, I understand they will also walk people to their cars in the station carpark if requested. People do feel safer with them around and perception is as important as actual safety.

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  7. Hope the chemo treatment works Andrew, does for many but not for some unfortunately. By the sound of it BAD :) is the determined type, she'll no doubt be up and running again soon.

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    1. Grace, she is a determined person and she will go on well, but it was moving to see her showing vulnerability.

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  8. Hope the latest treatment for your friend is working. The building on the station is pretty crude.

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    1. Thanks Diane. Crude is a good adjective to describe it.

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