Saturday, August 09, 2014

Mind the Gap

From Perth in West Australia a co-operative effort by train passengers freed the man's leg from the gap between the train and the platform.


London's Tube system is famous for its "mind the gap" announcements and believe me, there are some monster gaps on The Tube. It is only a slight exaggeration to say you need to take a run up and then jump.

22 comments:

  1. I heard about that incident on the news but seeing the video shows just what you can do when you all work together. The gaps between our platforms and trains/tubes are horrendous. There was a video out last year showing a woman who was drunk. She got off the train OK but then stepped back and disappeared between the train and platform. Fortunately she wasn't hurt. Probably the drink had numbed her senses.

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    1. Fun60, there was a monster gap at one of the London stations we used, but I can't recall which one. People should not get so drunk, but then the system should protect those who are.

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  2. I saw that people power push on the TV news, it seems they only had to move it a smidge to get the man free. The gaps these days are smaller than they used to be when I was pushing kids in prams.I had to be so watchful then with the ones who were walking beside the pram.

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    1. River, maybe Adelaide is more gap free than other Australian cities. While I know it would cost money to fix, they really ought to be no more than a centimetre.

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  3. Andrew, a terrible accicdent luckily the leg was freed. Definitely in London I have have the annoucement in London underground.

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    1. Gosia, they don't make such an announcement for Polish stations? Or maybe you don't have gaps.

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    2. Yes, we have gaps but they don't make announcements you must be careful as a passenger.But they give announcement Get on carefully and watch out pickpockets.

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    3. Ah well, that warning is good too.

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  4. I love it when ordinary citizens pitch in and help a fellow citizen, without waiting for the police to take control. That footage is heart warming.

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    1. Hels, we can be very critical of society at times, but I would like to think this is typical.

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  5. It's true. Just when I think people will never come together, I see something like this and my faith is reaffirmed in humankind.
    I don't think our trains or street cars have such a gap. Well, the street cars mostly open to the street but it seems the trains extend a covering over the gap when the doors open. I will have to check it out next ride to make sure I am not making things up again. :)

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    1. Rubye, heart warming are the words, I suppose. Your system is fairly new, I think. Maybe better designed. Btw, our friend who lives in Japan has just been in your fair town. We await a report.

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    2. I am sure he loved it here.

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    3. She actually, Rubye. Does a place called Voodoo and doughnuts mean anything to you?

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  6. I loved this when I heard about it. And my cynical self thought ' see - the leaners are valuable too'.

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  7. It's always good when people work together.
    People power.
    Merle...........

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    1. Merle, maybe it takes one person to take charge and speak up loudly for everyone to get onboard, so to speak.

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  8. It seems to me that a 5cm gap between train and platform is perfectly reasonable and 99.99% safe - assuming the Perth incident was at a straight platform. Much less clearance and there's a real risk of train and platform coming into contact, especially whn 'express' services are involved. I'
    m thinking Newport in Melbourne here with its mix of Metrol stoppers and V-Line run-throughs. Even allowing for the speed redunction over the junction the V-Line trains can run through at 30 - 40 kph.
    If any rail system has extending ramps between the train and the platform then that must immensely increase the costs; every such ramp will need to be checked as being docked correctly and within the loading gauge before the train can move, as well as the checks on all doors closed and secured. Nice idea but it will price every rail and metro project right out of contention. Truly, the only perfectly safe railway is one that has no moving trains and no passengers.
    In London, Bank station on the Central line has ferociously-curved platforms, and IIRC, Waterloo on the Bakerloo is a pretty close second. Curved platforms were dictated by the need to keep the rights-of-way (that is, the tunnels) under public streets to avoid paying no doubt expensive and ongoing compensation to owners of property above the tubes. And when you put a straight line, as in a railway carriage, against a curved line, as in a curved platform, you get gaps. Maybe we should look at carriages between 1 and 3 metres long; that should keep the design people busy for a decade or two.

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    1. Chris, perhaps it is the variations that are the problem. But as you point out, it is impractical to reduce some gaps and also standardise them. The gaps don't worry me personally, but I am just curious about them and you have explained quite a bit. It may have been the Bakerloo, Waterloo Station where I saw a big gap, as we did use that train from that station.

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  9. Must make sure I mind the gap :)

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    1. You always do Grace. You always do.

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