Friday, July 18, 2014

When two tribes go to war

As Palestinians and Israelis go into an increasingly desperate and tragic phase of the long going war, who should I side with? I know many Jewish people and I know no Palestinians. Naturally I am sympathetic to those who I know. Ultimately I blame Britain when they 'sorted out' the area so many decades ago and then the United Nations a bit later.

However, this simple map, which I can't vouch for, tells a story. The situation is far more complicated than a simple map and no doubt the map was made by a supporter of Palestinian, but it worth considering. The green area on the left of the last map is the Gaza.

All so messy and tragic.




17 comments:

  1. Andrew, the situation in this part of the world is very complicated and tragic one. What 's more how to solve it ? That's the question? Who support the next? Who is right ?
    Let's hope in the future will be better. But I am a pessimist sorry....

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    1. Gosia, I agree with your point that it may be a long time before we see peace there. How can it ever be when the surrounding countries are in turmoil and are unstable.

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  2. I suspect (indeed I am certain) that there has been bad behaviour by both. Not helped by well meaning interference.
    Though I don't know what the solution is - and wish I did.

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    1. Without doubt EC. I alternate between sides, they shouldn't do that, then to the other side, they shouldn't do that.

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  3. It's confusing and complicated. Maybe one day they'll work it out.

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    1. Dina, a can of worms that can never be untangled?

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  4. Both sides have behaved badly but what I want to know is being a jew a religion or a nationality.
    Was all that land bought and paid for by the jewish people or was it taken by force, I rest my case.
    Merle..............

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    1. Merle, no doubt I will be corrected if I am wrong, but being Jewish is both a religion and a race, rather than a nationality. Non religious Jewish people can still identify as Jewish, no matter which nation they come from.

      As far as I know, the land was not bought, but the area divided up after the first and second world wars by Western countries.

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    2. I think you are wrong Andrew. Being Jewish is the religion, the race is Israeli. After all there are Russian Jews, Italian Jews, German Jews etc.

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    3. River, as I said, I am not so knowledgeable about the subject. We would need to define the meaning of race. I am fairly sure there is more to being Jewish than religion.

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    4. Andrew, you are more knowledgeable than you think. Yes, being Jewish is more than a religion. It's a cultural ethnic kind of thing. And no there is not an Israeli race! Israel is a country and if you don't have citizenship there, you're not considered Israeli.

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    5. I stand corrected.

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  5. Well personally I am very disappointed in Israel. The U.S. usually takes Israel's side regardless of what they do but with this latest conflict I have noticed there is not the usual siding with Israel regardless of what they do but rather there seems to be a bit more empathy with the Palestinians.

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    1. Rubye, now you mention it, the US has been less vocal than usual. With so many Moslem immigrants perhaps the balance of opinion, that is votes at election time, is changing. Palestine would garner a lot more sympathy and support if they stopped firing rockets willy-nilly into Israel.

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  6. The partition of Palestine into two states (one Jewish and one Arab) was resolved by a vote of the UN General Assembly in 1947 with 33 voting in favour (Australia being the first to vote in favour in the alphabetical vote) 13 voting against, 10 nations abstaining and 1 absent.

    The Jewish state was declared in 1948 but the Arab nations refused to set up the Arab state. Hostilities have continued to varying degrees ever since.

    I can't see how any peaceful resolution of the issue is possible without considerable compromise from both sides; a prospect that has never seemed likely in all the decades since.

    Perhaps the best prospects were when President Sadat of Egypt and Prime Minister Rabin of Israel engaged in peace negotiations. Sadly both were assassinated by their own nationals. Says it all really.

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    1. Victor, thanks. Some of this I knew. Your second para is interesting. This I did not know. Was the Arab attitude, all or nothing?

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    2. Understandably, I suppose, they didn't want partition, full stop.

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