Thursday, July 03, 2014

Eurocruise 30/05 Newcastle, Newburn & Gosforth

In the morning S1's husband drove us a short distance to Newburn for a walk along the banks of the Tyne River. I was surprised to see that the river this far upstream, some kilometres, is tidal. I was unaware of the Battle of Newburn, but it played a significant role in British history.



Inventor of the world's first train lived here for a time.


The tide is out, it would seem.


While we felt like we were far out in the countryside, we were not.


I suppose the Tyne has many tributaries, and this is but one.


Hadrian's Wall stretched from the east coast to the west coast of England. It was built by the Romans to keep the marauding and uncouth Scots out. I have read one person's account of walking the route of the wall, which is still intact in places. Sounds like a a Marie type adventure.


Sister 1 and her husband's dog, a previously mistreated lurcher. She is old and very timid but not aggressive at all. As soon as Sister 1's husband is out of sight, she becomes anxious.


A little inland along the river walk are lots of trees planted in memoriam of a departed loved one. 


I deferred to my reader's sensibilities by not using the side photo that clearly showed it was a male horse. It was a long walk for us who were a little hungover from the night before celebrations, but very head clearing.


Another great late pub lunch at the Northumbrian Piper.


We were there to meet up with Sister 1's daughter, partner and children.


And hopefully Sister 1's son, wife and one year old daughter. Sister 1 and her son have a tenuous relationship, but they did come after lunch. Sister 1 never had alcohol before she was fifty, but she has made up for it since. Her son is very responsible and restrained. While they did not have contact for some time, at least now they do up to an extent. I'll say he was polite to R and myself, no more.


The gardens of  'The Piper' were lovely. There was even some forest where the kids could run around and get lost in.



On the way back, we called into see one of R's cousins and her husband. She is older than R and the last time we saw them in 2008, we thought they would both be dead by the time we next visited, but no, both seemed brighter than ever. Their unmarried 40 year old son lives with them, and he seemed disinclined to be friendly. Ok, I get that.

As we had a large mid afternoon lunch, I think we just had take away Chinese, with chips of course. To Australians who are used to breakfast, lunch and dinner, UK meals times can be a little weird.

12 comments:

  1. Andrew, in England meals are definitely different from Australians. But it is an adventure eating it for short time. I believe Hadrian Wall is very interesting to see and it's visible and ancient sign of Romans on the British Isles. Newburn is fantastic and rustic town

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    1. Gosia, there are even short sections of the wall remaining in the city itself. So old, I can hardly imagine it.

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  2. How very beautiful. Green and lush. And quite alien to me.
    Families are complicated animals aren't they?

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    1. Green and lush describes it well EC. Plants are a green we don't see in Australia. Mind, it comes at a price, rain, lots of rain. Quite true about families.

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  3. More beautiful buildings and countryside!
    What lovely memories you will have. Dinner conversations for years, talking about this place and that.

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    1. Seems like a bit of a dream now River. Kind of wish I was back there.

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  4. Hmm, it's not that much effort to be pleasant and make small talk to folk visiting from abroad. Maybe I was brought up better.

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    1. Fen, I guess you mean the son. It is not he has issues with. He may have issues with his drunken mother ringing him at 2am. "But I never had a drink until I was 50'. Complicated.

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  5. It is a lovely part of England. You or R seem to have relies everywhere. Handy when travelling.

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    1. Diane, well not in England. The all live quite close by in greater Newcastle, with the exception of R's sister's sister in law, who is only a little way out into the country.

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  6. Yup families can be quite odd :) Ok Andrew being a Scot (with I'm sure if I traced back some French blood :) I'll accept marauding.. but uncouth! that's a wee bit harsh laddie :)

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    1. Similar to me Grace, Scottish, French and Italian, with some other little bits thrown in. There are few posher than a wealthy and educated Scot.

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