Thursday, May 01, 2014

I have currency

Hungarian Forint. Hungary exports all its old and shabby notes to Australia for tourists to buy, who then spend the money in Hungary and it is then sent back to Australia for more tourists to buy.

Euro. Crisp and clean plastic, with a stylish coin. We should expect nothing less. I thought I had more, but no, I have only one Euro coin. The notes were bought at a favourable rate some time ago. Note, it is a polymer bank note that last a long time, invented in Australia by CSIRO, a scientific organisation that has invented brilliant things for the world but is always under threat of cuts to its budget from our Federal Government. Hopefully The Abbott won't cut its budget this time.

English Pounds. See Hungary. The pile of pounds is a decent amount of money, but I doubt the pile will sustain us for a week. I have a ziplock bag of brown and worthless English coins and I have no intention of them adding them to my luggage weight and returning them to their country of birth. I will leave them to my heirs to throw into the 'discard pile'. Any such coins I receive on the this visit, I will just theatrically chuck over my shoulder.


I get somewhat annoyed now at home when I get a useless silver five cent piece in my change. While it won't affect my vote, maybe PM Abbott should get rid of them. The usefulness of ten cent coins is fast waning.



29 comments:

  1. Since my excitement is building over your trip, I can only imagine how you are feeling. Getting close now...

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    1. EC, a week or so to go. Filled in the form for mail to be held today. Another thing ticked off.

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  2. Hello Andrew,

    We are smiling as we gaze upon your stash of Forints. It seems totally unbelievable that soon you will be here spending those very same notes. 1000 Forint is roughly 3 Euro as a quick ready reckoner!

    Hungarians generally look after their Forint notes far better than the English look after theirs. We have to check that we do not try to change notes where the Queen has been given a moustache since the change offices will not accept them. So, keep your Forint notes neat and tidy!

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    1. JayLa, we will take great care of our Forints then. We have 42,000 of them so that would be about €126. Actually, Euro is quite meaningless to me. About £2.70 or AU$4.50.

      I will give the Forint a press with the iron as soon as I am done here.

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  3. Get rid of our 5 and 10 cent coins? I hope the day when inflation reaches the point that our cents become irrelevant and only dollars figure in any monetary exchanges doesn't arrive in my lifetime.

    As a child my tram fare to school was one penny (one cent). I know, I know; the good old days!

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    1. Victor, well maybe not ten cent coins.

      If your tram fare was only one pence, then why did you sit staring out the window when the conductor came past collecting fares?

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    2. Andrew, I don't recall suggesting that I stared out the window - non existent in the toaster trams anyway - when the conductor passed by.

      In any event as the fare suggests, one penny went a long way in those days.

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  4. If I go travelling without the beer fairy I bring back coins and notes for him but never keep any myself.
    Are you getting all excited about the trip, if you could push a button and just arrive I would travel all the time but I hate flying.
    Merle..................

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    1. Merle, you have it one. If only that button was available.

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  5. On the flight home, each seat has an envelope for left-over coins, Australian or otherwise. I hope the money really does go to community development programmes in Africa, otherwise I have wasted a large number of coins since 1966.

    Notes are another thing altogether. If the left over notes are British or Euros, you will use them again in the near future. But what if they come from a country you will never again visit for the rest of your life? The banks will take more commission than the notes are worth :(

    The usefulness of the PM is fast waning.

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    1. I've never noticed those envelopes on the way home Hels. We have in the past dumped coins at airports in the appropriate collection containers but I thought the bank would take the pence back. They wouldn't but as long as we keep the receipt from our bank where we bought the overseas money, they will exchange the left over notes without a charge.

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  6. I have seen these big transparent boxes kept at Airports where you can donate the coins. It goes for charity.

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    1. Hello Haddock. Yes, we have used them in the past and we will look for them when we return. Interesting that Poona is now called Pune. I can't keep up with the name changes in India.

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  7. I love foreign moneys!
    Hate to say it but the CSIRO staff are facing redundancies, my Aunt isn't sure if she'll have a job in a couple of months :(

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    1. Fen, why do conservative politicians dislike the CSIRO? It is not like it is a hotbed of communism. Good luck for your aunt.

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  8. "under threat of cuts to its budget from our Federal Government. Hopefully The Abbott won't cut its budget this time."
    Probably not. They're threatening cuts to aged pensions, but NOT POLITICIANS PENSIONS, child care, which won't affect THEM at all, and other things which we poorer people need. Yet we taxpayers continue to fund THEIR overseas jaunts, gold passes, Mr Rann's rent ($1000 per day), and so on. Once we're cut and taxed into being completely broke, who will they get "their" money from? eh?

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  9. P.S. every year, all year, all of my five and ten cent coins, twenties too, go into a money tin which isn't opened until Christmas and not even then if I don't need it. Get yourself one, you may find all that odd cash comes in handy when you are 80 and the government says "nothing in the coffers for you boy, we need to fly to Rome for the summer."

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  10. Sorry, having a grumpy day.

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    1. River, a grumpy day is allowed in life. I'd be interested in your opinion about working women? I imagine for some, with high flying careers or even a bit less, would find great satisfaction in their work and being able to afford childcare and receive maternity leave.

      Many do much lesser jobs and would probably prefer to stay at home and raise their children, rather than work from necessity.

      I put all my spare change in a very large and tall metal box at work, otherwise known as the coffee machine. I think I will get a money box though, for five cent pieces.

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    2. Working women? If that's what they want to do, fine and if high wages and good maternity leave are part of the package, even better.
      Even those doing lesser jobs, if that is their choice will often be happy. I know many women not earning very much, but loving their work.
      Those who choose to stay home and manage the household and raise children, are happy too. That was me. Until going to work became necessary. Even then, I was happy because my youngest was already in school and I liked the job I'd found. But the last job, at Coles, made me miserable.
      My whole point is, if you get enormous satisfaction from your job, then it doesn't matter what you do or how much money you make. and I am happy for any woman anywhere who has that job satisfaction.
      Use the money box for ten cent pieces too.

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    3. Thanks River, and things to think about.

      Ok, I will save ten cent coins too.

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  11. I never take a lot of cash with me (too many pickpockets everywhere) I mostly pay with bankcard or credit card. It works in all countries. The last coins (except for the UK, which I keep for the next trip) I leave at the airport there is usually a box for the maintenance of tourist sites. In Hungary spent the most of your cash and what's left give it to a poor there are so many !!

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    1. Gattina, I am paranoid about pickpockets. While we use cards at home all the time, each transaction when overseas attracts a fee.

      Yes, there is little point in leaving Hungary with Forint in our pockets.

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  12. Andrew, now it's high time to buy a new purse for it or maybe three . When I travel to England I also have three currency so I have to be careful. But my finger crossed Have a nice journey.

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    1. Gosia, when we went to the UK in 2008, we managed our own AU dollars, Singapore dollars, British Pounds and Euros. I think we will be ok.

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  13. I just had my very first trip overseas and it was my first time seeing Euros. I wish you well on your trip Andrew. I bet you're getting excited!

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    1. I didn't realise that was your first overseas trip, Keith. Clearly it was a productive time.

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  14. Completely agree re 5cent coins.. an annoying wast of space! Andrew if you're going to throw coins over your shoulder with gay abandon try to find a fountain for them to land in so you at least get a wish for your discarded money and secondly can you get R to take a picture each time you do it.. throw the coin I mean :)

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    1. Good idea Grace. My luck they will land in someone's face. Photo of me? I am not sure about that at all.

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