Tuesday, February 25, 2014

Words #79.7

I often get asked questions about the English language at work. While I speak English and have picked up a few basics about it, often I have to resort to 'well, that is just how it is' when I reply.

A workmate asked me how to express being drunk in English but in a colloquial manner. He had me scratching my head but I soon came up with 'being drunk as a skunk'. Except a skunk is not an Australian animal.

"Pissed as a newt", I tried. He was happy with the answers. But while you and I may have a vague idea what newt is, who really knows?

I tried to explain to him the quite revolting English expression, 'bladdered', but he did not know in English what a bladder is.

Later I thought, why don't we have a good Aussie term, as drunk as........? "I was as drunk as a ....". "I was ....".

Help me. What is the good old Aussie term?

13 comments:

  1. Any 16 year old nowadays no doubt has a very colourful and barely printable expression for how they enjoyed the previous evening.

    I'm sure I've heard many older expressions but cannot bring any to mind except the comparatively dull 'full as boot'

    A certain Sydney shock jock who you would never listen to made the following comment this morning; 'full as a public school'. Very dull, I know.

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    1. 'full as a boot' I meant to type.

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    2. Perfect Victor. I expect that was what I was looking for. I think I get the 'full as a public school'.

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    3. Hello Andrew:

      Alas, we cannot help with Australian terms. However, for English ones we can offer 'plastered', 'legless' and, simply, 'pissed' [no newt required!!].

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    4. JayLa, all three are words used here. While I immediately understand legless, almost every other expression for being very drunk is a puzzlement. Do skunks get drunk occasionally? Frequently? Boots get full?

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  2. Replies
    1. Wombat, that does sound quintessentially Australian.

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  3. I have seen animals in the wild knock down fermented fruit from trees and eat the fruit and intoxicate themselves (get legless) to releive BOREDOM. In also noted not a single animal was reading the Bible or any other such religious type book, not even a skunk Andy.

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  4. KL, but does a skunk knock down fermenting fruit?

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  5. I was going to say pissed as a fart too, but what the heck does that mean?

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    1. Fen, indeed. Some expressions may give a hint, but that one, nothing.

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  6. 'Three sheets to the wind'..how about that Andrew :)

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    Replies
    1. Grace, why couldn't I remember that one.

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