Tuesday, February 04, 2014

Hosting a dinner party #101, minus

We had two friends around for dinner. It has been years since we have done such a thing. Our dyke friend and our hairdresser friend came, with our dyke friend suggesting take away pizza for dinner.

But I stepped up to the crease and produced a very nice entrée of stuffed olives, cheeses, quince paste, houmous/beetroot dip and biscuits while we chatted. I then heated and browned the lasagne I had made earlier and set the table and put out the salad, condiments and dressings. The garlic bread was perfect. Dessert was from a packet mix, but the chocolate mousse topped by raspberries and cream was very nice.

Ok, that is a lie. R did all that. I helped a bit along the way, but it is best that cooks are left alone when working. I take notes when R is cooking, in case I outlive him. I think I have it right. Dessert always begins with frying up onions.

When I noticed our two guests getting up to pour themselves another glass of wine, I realised I am a bad dinner host. They had to drive, so that is my excuse for not topping up their drinks.

Our dyke friend brought dog Jack with her. That was fun. Jack is not a dog who is normally focused on food. But recently someone who looked after him fed him tidbits under the table. To our great amusement, like as you try not to laugh at something a toddler has done which is both naughty and funny, while we ate our dinner, Jack removed the chunk of blue vein cheese from the platter on the coffee table and was rolling it around on the floor, busily licking away.

I went outside for a breath of fresh air and when I returned, our Hairdresser Friend had spread out white powder on our black reconstituted granite benchtop and was lining it up with her her credit card. "Do you have as straw Andrew?", she asked.  It took me about an alarming two seconds to realise she was kidding. It was bi-carb for her indigestion.

I suppose you could call it a dinner party, but I think there is a good reason why dinner parties are so twentieth century.

29 comments:

  1. Sounds like you are my type of dinner party host Andrew.

    And, yes, all desserts commence with onions, celery and carrots being browned in a pan, thereafter add stock etc and so forth ..........

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Victor, you must give me the dessert recipe in full.

      Delete
  2. next time I suggest going for a picnic it's the best option

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I suggested a picnic lunch for my wedding. My mother almost had a heart attack, but dad thought it was a great idea.

      Delete
    2. Gosia, an evening picnic would have been nice.

      Hels, I can imagine your father thinking it was a good idea. Think of the $ saving.

      Delete
  3. I miss my dyke friend from Sheffield
    She could swig her wine!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. As can our dyke friend, John, although not like she used to.

      Delete
  4. Excellent fun :)

    Very 20th century, yes, but I still love dinner parties. A lot of work for the host, of course, so these days each couple brings one plate (entree, soup, salad or cake...I do the mains).

    The hosts and two other people might not be enough. To share the conversation around, I personally prefer eight people. To be able to see everyone at the table, 12 would be my maximum.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hels, I think eight is really the maximum. It has been a long time since we have done that. Yes, it is nice for people to bring a course.

      Delete
  5. I haven't had more than one person to dinner in so very long that I don't know if I could do it now, but I used to love the challenge of getting it all together. I never did learn to cook.
    That dessert sounds scrumptious.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Rubye, it is just another thing that gets harder when you get older.

      Delete
  6. Andrew, not to carp but in my opinion one couple as guests for another couple does not quite qualify as a dinner party: it is friends around for dinner. I'd say you need to have at least two independent sources of guests before it qualifies as a party. Still, sounds good, even if a bit of an anticlimax with the white powder.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Marcellous, it is as close as we will get to hosting a dinner party now and in the future. I understand what you mean by a proper dinner party, and I don't know that we have ever done that. Barbeque, yes.

      Delete
    2. I aspire to a party in the sense of more than one source of guest, but rarely manage it. Last year, three times only, and once was actually lunch, not dinner.

      On reflection, I think dinner parties are twentieth century because of the general disappearance of domestic servants (who once did the job for the well-to-do) and stay-at-home homemakers (who in the post-war years for all but the very rich did the job for their husbands).

      Delete
    3. Marcellous, by the time someone shops and cooks, it is a lot of time, and many people just don't have that kind of spare time. Oh, for a servant or two.

      Delete
  7. White table cloth gleaming silver sparkling glasses all the crockery matching = dinner party
    Friends for dinner is so much nicer these days and so much easier. More fun even! Dinner parties used to put me on edge and something would always go wrong - always my fault never The Golfers!
    Sounds like it was a great evening - from your decription I almost felt I was there with you - mind you I would have chivvied you for another glass of wine
    Take care
    Cathy

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cathie, the two words 'dinner party' are rather loaded with expectations. Yes, informal eating is nicer. Usually I am not bad with drinks, but my excuse is they are lushes and drink too quickly.

      Delete
  8. Bicarb for digestion? Well I never.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Fen, it is an old remedy.

      Delete
  9. Yes dinner parties are so twentieth century, but they're good to bring back every once in a while :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Keith, when someone else hosts them.

      Delete
  10. "Dessert always begins with frying up onions".
    I think your notes are a little mixed up there Andrew.
    I'd have a panic attack if I saw white powder lined up on my bench! Thank goodness it was bi-carb. Isn't that usually mixed with water or juice and drank?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. River, she threw it down the sink. She had more and put it in water.

      Delete
  11. Your dinner sounds perfect to me and a fun night. I love dinner at friends' or having people over for dinner but it's years since we've done either. As you say there is just no time, even on a weekend. A bit sad really!
    Great post.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jackie, it can be just as nice sharing a take away meal with friends, or a barbeque.

      Delete
  12. This made me laugh so much Andrew.. I could just imagine the look on your face when you came in off the balcony to find that scenario hahahah! she really got you good! Your 'dinner party' sound like fun, I remember the days when you invited people around for a fondue.. so bad :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Grace, never did the fondue thing, although we had a set. Re-invented with chocolate to dip in, but I haven't see that for a while either.

      Delete
  13. Food, Friends, Good Times, and cheeky dog....... All the ingredients for a good time!

    Dinner party or not - it was a party of friends and they are the best!

    You had better of enjoyed it - PS I'll take the dog if you don't want him ;)

    xxoo

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Heather, yes it was a simple dinner with friends. We'll be fine looking after Jack, thank you.

      Delete