Wednesday, February 26, 2014

Flagstaff Gardens

We were travelling along King Street to the Lost Dogs' Home in North Melbourne. I remarked to R that I had never really seen Flagstaff Gardens.  A day off from work a week or so later, I remedied that. 

Here we go. It is quite green, meaning it is one of Melbourne's favoured parks that is irrigated. It steadily rises from the corner of Latrobe and William Street.


Pretty generic park photo. Maybe I can improve the photo with some words. William Street can be a rather bleak city street, especially in winter. It is full of offices and so naturally office workers. But at the top of William Street is this marvellous and very old park. On this warm and sunny day, many were taking advantage of it.


It was a few weeks ago when I took these photos. I can't recall what this monument is. I guess war. City buildings appear above the treetops of Flagstaff Gardens.


In the days of early Melbourne, upon this hill sat a time ball, to tell people the time. It was viewable from ships in Port Phillip Bay. I think the standard time for a time ball to drop is 1pm. Although since destroyed by the Christchurch earthquake a few years ago, we did see a working time ball drop at Lyttelton Harbour in New Zealand.


A marvellous looking elm tree.


Below the edge of the gardens is King Street, a major north south traffic thoroughfare through Melbourne and south from here a nightclub precinct, a place of much of much trouble in the early morning hours at weekends.  In the background you can see cranes at the Port of Melbourne, Australia's busiest port.


Across King Street is something old. Excuse me while I check. I am back. It is Melbourne's oldest church, St James Old Cathedral, predating the gold rush and opened in 1842. Well, I never.


A begonia bed, a bit frizzled after the heat wave, but still going. Behind is a house, which was probably the head gardener's abode.


These plants look quite hardy for Australia's summer heat.


A magnificent Moreton Bay Fig. Melbourne has a lot of them, and in their natural habitat, the grow on a host plant and then kill them. It is of the banyan tree family. Even they are affected by drought and heat in Melbourne.


How to get back to the centre of town? I took the underground train from Flagstaff Station to Melbourne Central. Within the commercial development of Melbourne Central, the original shot tower was retained. A shot tower is for making lead bullets, where the molten lead was dropped from a height and formed bullets as it cooled during its descent.

22 comments:

  1. Lovely garden especially begonia bed. I am waiting for lovely flowers in my city especially for tulips bed which are multicoloured and so lovelyin the early spring.

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    1. Gosia, it must be wonderful when the first flowers arrive and you know the weather will be getting warmer.

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  2. Is Melbourne Central what used to be the Japanese Department store Daimaru?

    And, ah, what ever happened to Daimaru?

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    1. It is Victor. The store went broke and closed. I don't like Melbourne Central much. In spite of being a casual visitor for many years, I can't work out its confusing layout.

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  3. You can't beat a great park in the middle of a city always relaxing to stroll into.
    Merle...........

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    1. Merle, Adelaide with his city circled by parks is great, but at least we and you have some on the edge of the city.

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  4. I just love parks in the middle of cities. Random space.

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    1. They are indeed Rubye, and we are blessed with a few.

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  5. How I love parks in the city. A haven of peace so often. Thank you.

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  6. I love St James. It was commissioned by Charles La Trobe way back in 1839 in a more central city location. So although Melbourne has almost no colonial architecture, St James is still standing proudly :)

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    1. Hels, I have just read some history about where it was originally. Very interesting.

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  7. It looks like an oasis in the city. Another melbourne gem you have found. I went into a shot tower somewhere not sure where but i think Tasmania.

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    1. An oasis describes it well Diane. Thanks.

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  8. Interesting information about the shot tower. I had no idea bullets were made that way in the past.
    The begonia bed looks lovely as does the next garden bed.

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    1. A flower bed is a rare thing now River. They cost so much labour to plant and maintain, but I think they are worth it.

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  9. Tres jolie trip Andrew.. honestly how anything survives in this heat is beyond me. We have many Moreton Bay Figs as well, but they're probably in more danger from Colin Barnett than the heat :). So THAT'S how bullets are made.. who knew :)

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    1. It was nice Grace. Our MBF trees are really suffering at the moment. They don't seem quite as hardy as elm and plane trees. Hot dry climates aren't right for them.

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  10. Thanks for the great tour!

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  11. I used to drive past there every day and often wondered what it was like from the inside. I'm glad you explored it, for now I am wiser!

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    1. Fen, it is a great open and green space, but I was in the Botanic Gardens today, and there is no comparison.

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