Saturday, November 30, 2013

Is it an lrv? Is it a tram?

Japan is a quirky place. In the small northern town where our friend in Japan lived before she moved to large city, along with the mega company Japan Railways East's principle railway line where the bullet trains run, was a small privately owned railway. We came across a level crossing and I think it was a single track line. I did look up at the time where it went to and came from, but I forget now.

A little south of Yokahama on the Japanese coast is the town of Enoshima with what is best described as a light rail system, but it rather behaves like a tram in the centre of town and a train outside of town. I recall many years ago being chipped on my blog for describing Sydney's light rail line as being a tram line. It has taken until now for me to come across on the net the perfect answer. Who in Sydney who uses the tram refers to it as a light rail vehicle?

"I'm going into town now honey."

"Are you driving or taking the light rail vehicle darls?"

Of course they don't.

"I'm going into town now honey."

"Are you driving or getting the tram darls?"

I welcome a correction from anyone who lives along the line and catches the light rail vehicle/tram between Central and Lilyfield.

This is the photo, taken by S Keenan, that inspired this post. Pretty good photo, hey. The mass of wiring is reminiscent of Thailand or Vietnam, and not Japan. Surprising to see it in Japan. We must have stuck to the posh parts of Japan when we were there. It appears that a car has blocked the progress of the tram.


I went to You Chube to see what was there about this transport in the town of Enoshima. There was plenty. I liked this recording. To a Melburnian, cars getting out of the way of a tram is quite laughable. It is more likely cars will try to get in front of the tram to block it as they attempt to park, turn right or make a u turn.

18 comments:

  1. Andrew, I think there are people in Sydney who refer to those vehicles as Light Rail because that is the term that is used more often in the press and by Pollies.

    People of my vintage still remember our old tram network and are more comfortable referring to them as trams rather than light rail.

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    1. Victor, even here one line, the 96, is referred to as a light rail line, but funnily, trams run on the light rail. To have memories of Sydney trams is a wonderful thing.

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  2. Andrew

    I think Victor is right. I would call it the mode of transport the light rail and I'm sure many others would ("You can take the light rail in from Lilyfield", but if I was coming down George Street and saw one I would probably say "Look! A tram!"

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    1. Marcellous, catching the light rail does work ok. But what is it called if you are on it? Maybe the word vehicle can be omitted and one is just on the light rail. In Melbourne the phone chat goes, 'I'm on a tram...'. In Sydney, maybe it goes, 'I'm on the light rail...'

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  3. I don't know, but you've got a weird bit of writing that goes fair off the edge of your page. Gremlins!

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    1. Not on my screen Fen. Your tiger cat has done something to your lappy.

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  4. The photo shows a street that is too narrow, too crowded, full of poles and ugly wiring, no trees and very little sky. Advertising and street signage only add to the cluttered look. Not attractive for human beings.

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    1. It is certainly a busy photo Hels. I really don't get it, as we saw nothing like that in Japan.

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  5. When I think of Light Rail, I think of London's Docklands Light Railway (DLR). Small, driverless rail carriages joined together running on a discreet line with actual stations rather than just stopping points in the street.

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    1. Pants, I only recently learnt that the DLR was driverless. One thing I picked up from the link your housing email, was where Canning Town is. And has pretty cheap prices.

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  6. I think things will get ....interesting.....for traffic when trams are reintroduced here in Adelaide. I'm so glad I don't drive.

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    1. River, what do you mean reintroduced? The Glenelg route never closes and has been extended. Further extensions are on the drawing boards.

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    2. the further extensions is what I meant.

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    3. River, they kept the current extension pretty well not mixed with cars. I hope they can continue that with the extensions. From discussion elsewhere and my observations when we were there, more trams are needed to offer a more frequent service to deal with overcrowding.

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  7. My goodness, it seems there is a great deal of discussion "out there" about the difference between light rail and tramways.

    I do remember 4,000 years ago seeing the Glenelg tram for the first time and thinking "that's not a tram, it's a train" - primarily because there were platforms. Of course, now there are platforms for Melb Trams. Blowed if I know [or ever knew, for that matter]. Why did we once have signs that said "hail cars here" at tram stops?

    For all that, the footage of Japan is fascinating. I've never given any thought to what Japan might be like in parts - simply assumed everything was perfectly planned and organised. [I know... duh!]

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    1. FC, another reason might have been that they ran two together coupled to each other.

      Been a country boy, I remember asking my father what sort of car would you hail.

      Generally Japan is very well planned and organised. I was surprised by the scene above. It is a place of great natural beauty, but not of constructed beauty.

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  8. Do cars really get in the way of the Melbourne trams Andrew, I would have thought that 'biggest wins' rule would apply. did you see the coca cola ad on the side of the Japanese tram :)

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  9. Amazingly Grace, many motorists do.

    I didn't notice the sign, but I am not surprised.

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