Thursday, November 14, 2013

Clean air from the south

In Melbourne, if it rains, which it seems to do so rarely now, people duck for cover and umbrellas rise at the first sign of a spit of moisture. (note, this was begun some time ago. It absolutely pissistently rained yesterday)

I have noticed the same in Asian countries. One Asian person explained to me that the rain that fell in Asian countries was full of acid, so people need to protect their heads. I did not really believe that but it may be true.

As we set forth one Sunday to the tram stop to go to the shops, a light rain shower passed over. Be brave hon. We are of English stock.


When we were in England, I could not help but notice how people weren't fazed by rain. Only once it started falling heavily did they take action. A passing shower was ignored.

I doubt if I could ever acclimatise to a wet European summer and short winter days, much as I may say here, we need the rain when we are lacking.

Sydney's climate has much more even temperature than Melbourne, especially if you live in the privileged eastern suburbs and not in the far out west. Way out in the western part of Sydney, the climate is not nearly as agreeable.

Melbourne has one great advantage over so many places in the world. Take a look at the map. Where I live is Melbourne, bottom right of the map. Our prevailing winds come from the south to south west. Except for that little, constant drain on mainland taxpayers, island state of Tasmania, there is noting between us in Melbourne and the Antarctic. What a wonderful flow of clean fresh air comes from the Antarctic.


It is quite different to Asian countries where the air pollution and humidity is always hanging in the air. While China might be worse, Indonesia takes some beating for air pollution and rubbish pollution. This is a photo of an Indonesian waterway. I think you could nearly walk on it.




21 comments:

  1. I know that it is dangerous to rely on a television drama series for an impression of how a community lives but I have been intrigued by how the American version of 'The Killing' portrays the community response to rain in the US city of Seattle.

    Despite often heavy rain falls there are few umbrellas in sight. Most people are shown in the streets wearing presumably water proof tops but otherwise completely drenched. I know Seattle's reputation for being a very rainy city and have wondered if people there are really so oblivious to falling rain as this excellent crime series suggests.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Interesting Victor. You are so knowledgeable about the US.

      Delete
  2. I'm ignoring your pointedly provocative reference to where I live except for one word.

    Humidity.

    :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I did so generalise Victor. I am sure I did not mention that you live in the area that has the highest income in Australia or that you live in a very smart highrise apartment with views of the Bridge.
      I am not keen on humidity, but it is better than living outer west.

      Delete
  3. We get a pretty fair amount of rain here in Kentucky. Nobody really pays any attention to it unless it's a downpour. But people certainly seem to forget how to drive when it rains :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Interesting Keith. Yes, I know what you mean about driving in rain.

      Delete
  4. I pay my taxes.... I am ENTITLED to good weather.

    Rain must only fall between 10 PM and 6 AM.
    Humidity will never rise about 25%.
    From the 1st Nov on, day time temperatures must remain over 20c.

    Otherwise heads will roll!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You left one out Hels. The temperature should not exceed 25 degrees.

      Delete
  5. It is a shame that we are polluting our air by burning so much coal when we are one of the sunniest countries in the world.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. For sure Diane, but what we really need to do is cut our lifestyle impact. Don't expect me to be the first to stop forward.

      Delete
  6. You have hit on my one pet hate - umbrellas. I just don't get them. As you know I live in one of the busiest cities in the world where umbrella toting tourists can have your eye out in seconds. Come on. You all know you come to the UK for the rain, just embrace it!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Fun60, today at work I was almost injured by an opening umbrella in my face.

      So umbrellas are only needed when the rain pelts down? How terribly English.

      Delete
  7. I am so used to rain that it is amazing that I still have feet and no flippers !

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Gattina, nothing is ever perfect. Watching a 100 year old elm tree die in a drought is not so great.

      Delete
  8. That Indonesian waterway is horrifying! I hope the Indonesians who come out here change their habits and respect our waterways. And streets and footpaths and parks...
    Tell me why Tasmania is a constant drain on mainland taxpayers? Be specific. I know a few Tasmanians...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Generally they do River. Please do not ask me about people from the Middle East.

      Tasmania is simple arithmetic. Little money comes from the state to the federal government, but a lot more goes back the other way to keep Tasmania viable and for social security. West Australia used to be the same, but with mining, it now more than pays its share. Victoria and NSW are always the big payers, but QLD pays its way now. SA, I think always about break even, which is good.

      Delete
  9. Oh my, the river shot is crazy.. I freak out when I see the odd plastic bag in our river..and that's just probably been blown there by the wind !!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Grace, the contents of our river rubbish traps worry me, but we are not big problem.

      Delete
  10. We had days last week where the weather pattern was coming from the East. Always weird when it does that.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Fen, usually means rain, and it did rain.

      Delete