Monday, October 21, 2013

It was the Hawke who done it

I never saw a man cry until I saw ex Prime Minister Malcolm Fraser's quivering lip after he lost an election. Ex Prime Minister Bob Hawke crying on tv when talking about his daughter's drug addiction was remarkable. He cried again when China slaughtered its own people in Tiananmen Square.

My father never cried. That was how it was back then. How curious that suddenly men started crying, in public. Isn't crying kind of involuntary?

Mother told me the only time she saw Step Father cry was about a month before his death when Sister wrote to him a moving kind of thank you letter. He was angry that he was dying and angry that Sister wrote such a letter that made him cry, yet thorugh his tears, he knew that all the effort he had made for my brothers and sister over the years were appreciated.

A couple of days ago the fire chief in New South Wales broke up on air when talking about the fire fighters at his command.

I am not critical of blokes crying in public, but I just wonder how in years past they never cried. I can cry at the drop of a hat and often tear up when watching the news.

Men, who can understand them.

12 comments:

  1. I've never saw my father cry but my guy tears up at the news and in sad movies but I've never seen him do it in public, times have changed.
    Merle........... ........... ..............

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    1. Merle, something really happened between generations, didn't it.

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  2. Glad to see men crying on tv or in public, helps the younger males realise they don't have to be all macho man and bottle it up.

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    1. I agree Jayne. It's much better to let emotions out than bottle them up.

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  3. I'm always suspicious of crying politicians, even Julia Gillard last year conveniently teared up in parliament only a week after being called wooden.
    I cry way too easily including when I'm mad which is very annoying.
    As a kid I saw my dad cry only twice: once when he was drunk and once when his grandmother died. Both times it freaked us out a bit.
    things are definitely better these days.

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    1. Jackie, I certainly doubt Fraser and Hawke did not fake it. But I agree, we need to be suspicious. I don't know what I would have done if I saw my father cry. Like you, it would have freaked me.

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  4. I remember the days when men didn't cry and boys were expected to "man up" and not be sissies from an early age. I remember not crying much myself, holding back emotions that were better let out.
    When I heard Malcolm Fraser cried in public I was astonished, then later with Bob Hawke, more astonishment. I felt at the time that we didn't really need to know his family's troubles and he was just performing for public sympathy and votes. I'm not sure how I feel now about men crying in public, I think it depends on what they're crying for.

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    1. River, aren't they usually crying for themselves? Hawke about the Chinese massacre clearly wasn't and I think he was sincere. I think it is not great for male or female to cry in public just because they are booted out of office. In times of great sadness, maybe.

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  5. Times change, now men are allowed to show their feelings and cry wherever they want to. And that is good, why should a man always be the strong hero without tears and women have the right to cry ?

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    1. Agree Gattina, but after all the comments, I don't think crying should be used as a tool for sympathy.

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  6. Not me that's for sure...I used to think that book 'Men are from Mars, women from Venus' was a load of bunkum, but lately.....not so sure :))

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  7. Grace, we can only hope men and women complement each other. I think I understand women better than men, but then I don't understand myself very well either.

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