Saturday, October 26, 2013

Hilly Melbourne

While much of Melbourne is quite flat, we do have some steep hills, but nothing compared to Sydney. Here are a few and most of them are just names I use, which may or may be in general usage.

There is the Punt Road hill. It is steep, very steep. These old tramway buses used to crawl up the hill at about 15 miles per hour while belching out thick black diesel smoke. Photo by Roderick Smith.



There is the parallel Anderson Street hill, which is a challenge for joggers who are runners who 'do the tan'. I only do the Anderson Street hill in the car.

St Kilda hill, where Dame M used to live.

The Collins Street hill in town, leading to the so called Parisian end of Collins Street.

There is the Burke Road hill in Camberwell. It is quite steep.

And the Calatina hill or Scotch College hill in Glenferrie Road.

There are some others and you can point them out by name but these are the ones that come to my mind.

17 comments:

  1. As you say Sydney has some very steep hills but the scariest piece of road traversed by public transport that I remember from my youth is no more than 150 metres from my current residence.

    A left hand bend from Ocean Street into New South Head Road. Sitting on the upper deck of the old double deck buses I sometimes felt that we were at a 45º angle and about to topple over when the driver took the bend at speed.

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    1. Victor, I remember that intersection from things internet of the past. When I was young, double decker buses always seemed to defy gravity to me.

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  2. Nothing to do with hills but love the picture of the bus. Gosh, how old were they before they were retired? Sometimes the driver had to climb out at every stop and give the front door a kick to close it.

    At some stage there were huge pot holes near nicholson and holden streets and when i stood up to pull the cord managed to crack a tooth. Ah, sweet memories of good times past.

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    1. Pretty old I reckon FC. They were still around in the early 80s I think. Great anecdotes. I'll quote them.

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  3. My brother in law used to visit Melbourne rarely because Melbourne was so flat and Sydney was beautifully hilly. But, I would say, at least Melbourne has zero humidity in summer so that our skin is not crawling off our bodies.

    Anyhow enough of old rivalries. You should see San Francisco for real hills!!

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    1. I have seen a few photos of San Fran Hels. Apparently it is full of homosexuals, so I am not sure I would care to visit such a place. I dislike humidity as much as I dislike heat. Which great artist or writer came from a humid place? None.

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    2. Ha! San Francisco is one of my favourite places in all of North America :)

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  4. I like hills as long as I don't have to walk up them, or ride a bicycle up them. down is okay. If only all hills just went down....

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    1. River, very much everything that goes up must come down. Yes, you would be quite unused to hills. You have even less than we do.

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  5. My Sydney bestie lives in the Shire and boy are there some steep bits around where she lives. Makes for exciting driving!

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    1. Fen, we must be well eroded in Melbourne. Still lots of sharp bits in Sydney.

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  6. Come to think of it Andrew, Perth isn't all that hilly either..well apart from the 'actual' hills that is :)

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  7. King's Park is hilly?

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  8. I hate Melbourne it is so flat. Whenever I fly back home on airplane the landscape looks like a dead pancake. Whenever I go to Sydney I can see the beautiful harbour, beaches and rolling hills.

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    1. I can't disagree NL. Sydney is beautiful and more interesting for being hilly. But some parts of Melbourne are hilly. Even just north of the airport are hills.

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  9. Anonymous8:25 am

    great photo, nice to see the old AEC looking clean and well turned out. I used to repair and service these back in the day. In defense of the old darlings, they were best kept at low engine revs, so a slow climb in lower gears was a desirable way to drive them, but there is no excuse for black smoke, poor maintenance or deliberate excessive fuel was the most likely cause of that.

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    1. Thanks Anon. My memory of them would have been at the end of their days running the 246 as it now is and maybe was then. It is possible they were quite run down by that time. I can remember going past some sort of depot, perhaps in Thornbury, and seeing many of them stored there. They always looked terribly difficult to drive but then there was not traffic and of course they had conductors to look after passengers.

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