Monday, August 12, 2013

The value of money

I'd better write something a little lighter after this morning's effort.

Little Jo is learning the value of money. I've mentioned it before but Sister opened up Little Jo's money box  to find notes stuffed into it, notes taken from Sister's purse and Bone Doctor's wallet. That was a while ago.

When we visited Point Lonsdale Sunday Market yesterday, I noticed Little Jo had a calico bag with lots of coins in the bag. Somehow, she lost the bag which a kind adult friend had personalised for her with her initials, but not the money. Yes, we backtracked but did not find.

Little Jo is allowed to order one lunch from the local shop near her school each term. She gets very excited about lunch order day each term. 

Sister sent an sms today, "What's wrong with schools today? They teach your kids to write. Then the cheeky ones like Little Jo write unauthorised lunch orders with a hotdog, sausage roll and choc milk."

I am not sure if Little Jo was successful  with her naughty behaviour. Perhaps not, as Sister knew about it. While we were there, she made an envelope and a decorated letter on which R wrote a thank you note for the £10 Snow Aunty and Uncle in England (R's sister and bro in law) sent her for her birthday. I just hope Sister took control of the £10.

8 comments:

  1. I never learned the value of money until I began earning my own. The I had to learn to stretch it from one payday to another and I got very good at it. Saving was never part of the plan. Neither of my parents ever saved, so I didn't learn to. Until I was married and managing a house with bills, then later kids and more bills and I learned the value of putting away a certain amount each week to cover the bills when they came in. I had to be very sure hubby never knew about the envelopes, to him any money "lying around" was beer money or TAB money. After all these years I still use the same system, only now I include a savings envelope too. I don't think I taught my kids well enough, but they're managing well enough.
    It might be a good idea for Little Jo to get a certain small amount each week with an explanation of what it is for and the firm announcement that when it is spent there will be no more until the same day next week. My grandkids learned by this method.

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    1. River, at least you learnt along the way, unlike my mother who still hasn't. In days of old, not many people had any chance to save in a meaningful way.

      I don't know if Little Jo gets pocket money or not. I suspect not but I think she is learning the value of money.

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  2. She has bucket loads of initiative, that young lady. Every instalment is a ripper.

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    1. A little too much at times FC.

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  3. The more I read about Little Joe the more I like her, how much do you want to bet she'll turn that 10 pounds into 20 before you can say school lunch :)

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    1. Grace, I would not put it past her to work out some food trading scheme and make a profit.

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  4. I bet Little Jo will get the bank to not only redeem the 10 pounds into Aussie money but give her interest on it, instead of taking a fee :P

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    1. I should hope so Jayne. Get them while they are young and they often stick for life. Now, what happened to the State Savings Bank?

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