Wednesday, June 19, 2013

Evil Evil VCAT

VCAT strikes again. Among single, two storey and low three story buildings that surround the old Yorkshire Brewery site in Collingwood, VCAT has struck again, overriding City of Yarra and approving three 17 storey apartment towers. What does that do for the local character of one of Melbourne's oldest suburbs? VCAT is a disgrace and clearly there to support developers to maximise their profits, against local representative councils and local people.

I've just ploughed through the judgement. There are many conditions attached to the approval, but as I have discovered, the developer will quietly return to VCAT without any resident knowing and have the ones it finds onerous overturned, as the developer did across the road over public access between two streets.

Where VCAT treads, be afraid, very afraid. http://highriser.blogspot.com.au/2012/10/the-indefatigable-vcat-at-st-kilda.html

The VCAT decision was made by Laurie Hewet and Michael Read. Shame on them and I hope they feel guilty as they drive home to their historic houses in Melbourne's leafy eastern suburbs.

"How was work darling?"

"Really good, approved three seventeen storey towers in Collingwood.".

"Seventeen storeys in Collingwood darling? Oh! By the way my tennis club subs are due. Can you pay them please darling, and the boy's maths tutor said she hasn't been paid.  Sorry to be such a bother. I don't know how we manage on your modest income."


I am not at all suggesting that they are, but Members of VCAT do rather leave themselves open to accusations of being bribed by developers when they continually side with developers. It is all about perception.

8 comments:

  1. I don't think the members of VCAT take bribes. I think they are sooo attuned to developing at all costs, that they will happily pull down anything with heritage value or overdevelop beautiful suburbs. Shame, VCAT, shame!

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    1. Hels, I am not against increasing Melbourne's density, but he has be done with the community on board and not by slapping up cheap high rise and other inappropriate buildings wherever developers can get land.

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  2. I hate high rise, I worked on the floor26 for about 10 years and never liked it, why anyone wants to live in boxes in the sky is beyond me.

    There is talk of a 90 story block of units being built in Parramatta hope that doesn't go ahead.
    Merle........

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    Replies
    1. Merle, given I live in one, obviously I like high rise living, but they need to be placed sensitively. I am the first to agree that ours was not, but then the old St Kilda Road was already ruined.

      I recall not too tall office buildings in Parramatta but ninety storeys? That is taller than anything that already exists in Australia, I think.

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  3. Wow, 17 storeys is ridiculous.

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    Replies
    1. In historic Collingwood Fen, of course it is.

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  4. I agree that inner suburbs could use a little more housing density, but going too high and building cheap-as-chips boxes that won't stand the test of time is definitely wrong. I think highrises in suburbs should be limited to about 10 storeys, while higher blocks would be okay in the city centres as the business buildings are already higher in most places.

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    Replies
    1. River, think of Manhattan and you think of tall buildings and dense population, but most of the dense population is housed in apartment buildings there are no more than six storeys.

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Whenever I wish I was young again, I am sobered by memories of algebra.