Saturday, May 11, 2013

Don't get too paranoid

You may not be able to read this, so I will type out what it says. It was attached to a souvenir keyring/bottle opener brought back from Singapore. Is it supposed to send a positive message to prospective visitors? You be the judge.

No smoking - fine $1000

No urinating in lifts - fine $500 (imo, this should be higher)

No feeding (birds) - fine $1000 (should have it here, especially pigeons and seagulls)

No eating or drinking in MRT (rail system) - fine $500 (definitely should be here too. I recall you weren't allowed to eat or drink on the buses in Singapore either)

No littering - fine $1000

Not flushing - fine $150

Possession of fire crackers - cane

Possession of drugs, +20g - death sentence

Vandalism - gaol and cane (what was the name of the lad from the US who vandalised cars? Michael something. Ah, Fay)

Singapore is a Multi Racial City. Various Chinese linguistic groups formed 75.2% of Singapore's residents, Malays 13.6%, Indians 8.8%, while Eurasians, Arabs and others formed 2.4%.

21 comments:

  1. I think it is right and proper that a nation should warn tourists about behaviour that will get them into deep trouble. You don't want any 19 year old yob from abroad saying that he is not responsible since he didn't know the rules there.

    But let us get it into proportion. No smoking in public, vandalism and public urination fair enough. But similar punishments for feeding birds, not flushing and lighting crackers? Oh dear. What are they thinking???

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    1. Feeding the birds should be a caning Hels. I wonder how many of the laws are really enforced.

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  2. Ahh, no doubt you've heard by now that Franger station is to get a 13.8 million dollar upgrade. Ludicrous, as it has recently been refurbished.

    For much less, they should install an automatic flushing system in the "Gents" toilets at the bus station, just outside the railway station. It would make an enormous difference to the impression the city gives. $150 for not flushing? I'll vote for that.

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    1. I hadn't actually FC. Part of the $100 million allocated, I guess. You are fortunate to live in a marginal with a controversial local member. You are well informed about gents toilets?

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    2. The stench is unmistakable as to its source, and unbearable. Doesn't anyone play "chase the deodorant tablet" any more?

      [Yes - nothing worse than opening a pub in the morning to clean...]

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  3. Replies
    1. I agree Diane. I liked it a lot more than I expected to.

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  4. Not flushing...how do they police that? Do they have someone follow everybody into the toilets?

    We have signs in our buses that say no eating or drinking, most people don't, but there are a few who ignore the rules. I don't think there's any fine involved. Maybe there should be.

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    Replies
    1. River, problem is it is a bus rule, not a government law. It should be.

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  5. An Australian teen was sentenced to a caning for deliberate damage of a car in Singapore a few years back. I think his father lived there for his work. big stink at the time, but I thought hell no, bring it here.
    The Singapore authorities should land in Frnkstn and run things for a week. The street behaviour in the station is horrifying.

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    1. Ann, I would really like to see Singapore police in charge of FKN for a week or two. That really would sort them out.

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  6. Hahaha, like River, I immediately wondered how to police no flushing - or to prove such a charge!! Back when my mother first visited Adelaide, she was amused by a sign saying 'Do not spit on or from this bus'. A very specific instruction that seems to no longer be required!!!

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    1. Red, ok, there is not spitting on buses or out of them now, but there is still public spitting in Melbourne at least. Quite horrid.

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    2. It's probably a bit daft to be so selective - what with cigarette-butt-grinding-out; used-chewing-gum-squishing; non-reusable-drink-container-throwing and verbal rubbish via f'in f'er conversations, spitting is the least of our public transport woes!

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    3. Quite true Red. But when are you ever on public transport?

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  7. Gosh that covers a wide spectrum of offences and punishments Andrew, from littering to the death penalty and everything in between, Singapore likes to keep a tidy house :)

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    1. Grace, S'pore does, but it never felt like it was an oppressive place. R visited the country in the 1970s and had have his hair cut short to get in.

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  8. Damn...they don't mess around.

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    1. Yes Keith, they take some things very seriously.

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  9. Last Sunday we witnessed several groups of people feeding the seagulls at Manly Beach almost beneath a sign in English instructing people not to do so.

    All the groups had the appearance of tourists from our region whose first language would not have been English.

    Improved and multi-lingual signage might help. One local shouted at a couple to stop feeding the birds in firm words which included 'I don't want the birds crapping all over me.'

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    1. Victor, good on him or her. There are far too many seagulls in this world.

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