Thursday, April 25, 2013

Digger Day Again

Digger Day has rolled around again. I alternate from sadness for wasted lives and feeling a little disturbed that Anzac Day has become far too big and all encompassing for its own good. While when it was in danger of dying off, which I never wanted to happen, when extreme feminists and anti war protesters tried to upset the day, which I did not approve of, I hoped it would survive until at least the last of the WWII diggers died. But no, it has become bigger than Ben Hur and getting bigger.

What are the authorities up to by not allowing the returned from Afghanistan soldiers to wear their medals if they march? Very curious.

I don't known whether to be proud or ashamed, but so far as I know, none of my relatives, dead or alive ever fought in a war, right back to the Boer War. Btw, if you want a quick history of the Boer War, do read Hels illuminating post. You might call it The Boer War for Dummies, but it is good quick read. There may have been some relatives of mine who I may not know about, but I have never heard of one killed during war or suffering from war injuries. My father did National Service at Puckapunyal  and was eligible for the Korean War, but no. Also curious, but I think many of them did not go to war because many were market gardeners, perhaps a protected species.

There are a good number of Australians who were not born here or their parents weren't, and I would not expect them to have strong feelings about the day. I hope they are content to know that it is a kind of special day for us multi generational Australians and be tolerant of the closed shops and us shedding a tear or two.

Oh, not so some Moslems.

Hizb ut Tahrir, banned in many countries but not Australia, says government requests for Islamic schools to note Anzac day is an unacceptable imposition of foreign values and history.

I would not expect Moslem schools to bang on about Anzac Day, but an explanations to the students of what the day is about might be nice, and helpful. Anyway, it un Australian to argue against a public holiday. A public holiday is just that. A day off for workers and school kids, or in my case, double time and a half. 
 
And how is this, to quote? Imposition of foreign values and history? We, Australia, are imposing on Australian Moslems foreign values and history? I am speechless, but not typeless. We are not asking you to celebrate. We don't, even if that goes a bit against what I said earlier. We are commemorating those lost in wars, and personally I use the day to commemorate all those lost in the wars we have fought and the futility of ones we have fought in. 
 
For all the Moslems who quite like Australia and our values, you really need to get a tosser like him under control and maybe he needs to have a good hard think about his mistake in choosing which country he wanted to live in. 
 
Australian values being foreign values in Australia indeed. Honestly, I am not a bad person, but the older I get the more I get to dislike Moslems without good reason, because of him and idiots like him and idiots in Canada, Boston, London. Ok, I will tone it down. I hate religious extremists of all kinds.

27 comments:

  1. I totally agree with you. I, myself migrated to this country from Europe at the age of 24. Everything was new to me, inclusing the language. But instead of trying to impose my views upon Australians, I looked, listened and learnt. It's called integration. If people are not prepared to accept the Australian way of life, there is a travel agent down the road, who can organise them one-way tickets back home. Happy Australia day!

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    1. Quite so Bill. The people I am speaking about just don't seem to get it.

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  2. 'What are the authorities up to by not allowing the returned from Afghanistan soldiers to wear their medals if they march?'

    Ironic isn't it? One of the features of Anzac Day is that it provides us an annual opportunity to reflect on the past and to learn the lessons of history.

    So it seems that each batch of veterans from a new theatre of conflict has to experience a period of shunning before we embrace them with regretful open arms. The more things change.......

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    1. Do you think it is that Victor? I hope you are incorrect. Sadly when the population is very divided over whether we should be there or not, authorities now are very cautious.

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  3. When you come to a country you integrate and accept its ways if you can't do that then don't be so bloody rude to think you can change that country. If I go to Germany, Greece or Pakistan I know before I go that each country has their way of doing things and not to wear my welcome out by criticising and expecting everyone to bow and scrape to me -

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    1. Precisely MC. Try to go to religious place in Pakistan wearing what you might here on a summer's day. You just don't do it out of respect for the country who is your host.

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  4. Imposition of foreign values? Let's add to that the reduction in criminal sentences when newcomers "don't know" things like sexual assault are unacceptable here. Or the ludicrous ALP proposal to make "offending people" illegal.

    Your words "wasted lives" and Victor's "learn the lessons of history" sum up nicely what ANZAC day includes: a thank you to those who serve on our behalf, whether we approve of our involvement or not.

    World War I happened because an enormous web of ill-considered alliances came into play after one Austrian Archduke was shot - alliances cobbled together by schoolyard gangs of naughty boys [many of whom were related].

    The alliance between Turkey and Germany was just one of them. How privileged am I to sit here today, wondering whether Australians and Turks were both victims or both aggressors? And wonder just how well educated some of these extremist tossers are.

    Extremist Muslims are on a par with "Christians" who bomb abortion clinics as a protest against murder... or use drones to kill innocent citizens.

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    1. FC, no religion is innocent, but some are worse than others. I'm off to chant now.

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  5. 26% of Australians weren't born here. They were born in Britain and New Zealand, then Italy, Greece, Yugoslavia and Lebanon, and later from Vietnam etc. So I am guessing that their fathers and grandfathers were as involved in war as Australian-born fathers and grandfathers were. Perhaps on our side, perhaps not.

    No-one forgets their families' war experiences. Perhaps ANZAC day does nothing but unite those diverse experiences in one, big, national memory.

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    1. Hels, I think the appeal to many is that the day does unite people and may it stay that way.

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  6. I haven't been to the War Memorial in Turkey, but it apparently gives equal floor space to the Allied AND local troops who lost their lives. There are significant differences between celebration, commemoration, reflection and awareness - it is not too much to ask anyone living in Australia by choice to at the very least be aware of ANZAC Day. And why is this person's imposition of foreign values on Australians OK, when a legitimate OZ public holiday cannot possibly be 'imposed' on a religious group? I don't get it!!

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    1. Red, I think the Turks are very decent about having us there, considering we intended to invade them. All we want is the day to be respected.

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  7. Following on from Red's comments i have been to the memorial for those who lost their lives at Gallipoli. It was very moving and sad to see how many Australians and New Zealanders had died. I believe Anzac Day is celebrated on the same date as that battle was fought. It is a tradition that should be honoured but should also be brought up to date by honouring all members of the armed forces who have fought in wars no matter where they have taken place. I totally agree that immigrants must intergrate fully into the society in which they have chosen to live. After all they have a choice, the oppressed, who our armed forces are trying to help, do not.

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    1. Fun60, while the day began to mark the day, it is now all encompassing of all Australians who fought.....well, almost. Vietnam veterans were not initially accepted a now perhaps there is an issue with those returned from Afghanistan.

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  8. In my opinion, if "he" doesn't want to accept the values and history then he shouldn't have come here. It's fine for him to believe and keep his own culture, but that means he needs to accept ours too.
    My hubby and his brother went to Vietnam where hubby had to stay concealed while he watched his brother get shot...tough call. Brother survived (and was on Ch7 news here last night). Hubby also was at Puckapunyal and put Normie Rowe through his training.

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    1. oh River that is so terrible about the brother in law. you would never get over the trauma (I didn't see the news. Have not watched TV news since Black Saturday).

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    2. River, that is a nasty thing to see. I remember the fuss about Rowe being conscripted.

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  9. ANZAC day should definitely be a day for all religious groups, cultures, atheists, pacifists etc to take time to remember the horrific consequences of war. ANY war.

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    1. Kath, agree. All embracing.

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  10. Over here in the states I was not aware of this holiday but it sounds like one that I would love to observe and pay homage to. Thank you for this post.

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    1. Keith, I suppose you have a similar day. I can't quite recall what it is now.

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  11. Honestly Andrew, when I go to the Dawn Service every year I'm in awe of the amount of respect for not only the Anzacs but all the men and women on active duty around the world today. It's really unbelievable that someone coming to live in Australia from another country would ever think that they had the right to even suggest something so outrageous.

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    1. Grace, no right whatsoever. How to get hated #101.

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  12. By accident I saw a bit of the Gallipoli service. There or somewhere else someone was running a schtick about this being the time Australia came of age as a nation etc.

    If ANZAC day were just about the suffering of soldiers and remembering their sacrifice, that would be fine by me, but it has always been opportunistically hijacked by the militarists and patriots, and more so in recent years, when I have watched its revival as a kind of nationalist kitsch with dismay.

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  13. Marcellous, how many times have we heard the phrase 'coming of age as a nation' in our lifetimes!

    I am not sure about nationalist kitsch, but at some point it may well turn into a party day, but I don't think it has yet.

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  14. To me it seems to be the cool thing to attend (the dawn service). I have family who fought and I'm all for honouring them. My Nan's partner who is 90 goes to the parade in a car courtesy of the RACV. He thinks it's wonderful :)

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    1. I have been once Fen. It is very moving and everyone should do it once.

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