Friday, February 08, 2013

What's in a name #37.5

To Australians, English place names can be a little perplexing. I did not realise that until we were there.

In London we stayed in Sussex Gardens. It is not the name of suburb but a Paddington street.

We walked along Whitehall and lunched in a pub in Whitehall. Not Whitehall Street, Road or Place, just Whitehall.

The marvellous Gherkin building is to be found at number 30, St Mary Axe, (City of?) London. St Mary Axe? What kind of street name is that?

We changed trains at Embankment tube station. Not The Embankment, just Embankment.

One of London's very busy stations is Bank. Just Bank.

Monopoly players may remember Strand, a London street. How can it not be The Strand?

Just a quick list of what we have here; street, road, highway, crescent, close, court, drive, lane, rise, way, avenue, boulevard, esplanade and probably more. The only confusing one I have come across in Melbourne is Musswell Hill, a street in the suburb of Glen Iris. Do you have any local ones, or Australian ones to add that don't have the usual suffix?

NB tourists: In Melbourne you need to use the full name of the street you want. Fitzroy needs the appendage street if  you mean the main street in St Kilda. Fitzroy is a suburb no where near St Kilda, however, there is also a Fitzroy Street in Fitzroy Street, so the correct phrase when asking directions is Fitzroy Street, St Kilda.




15 comments:

  1. Hello Andrew:
    We can appreciate the confusion but having been brought up with it all it seems perfectly straight forward!!

    Kellemes hétvégét.

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  2. JayLa, I am sure it is as mother's milk.

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  3. Geneva names its streets (rues and chemins, mostly) after famous people. Ours (Bouchet) is about the only one in our neighbourhood that isn't a full (usually deceased) person's name.

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    1. Ok Kath. I am very ignorant about Geneva. I can add to my original knowledge that it has a lake, trams and street names after famous people.

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  4. I had never thought about how strange the names are to tourists. They are what they are and usually there is a fascinating history behind the name.

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    1. Fun60, I am sure the tale behind every name is a history lesson.

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  5. Andrew, We do have some strange ways. Sometimes I'' look at a street sign and wonder why and how it got it's name.
    I once saw what looked like a fairly run down street called something like Prospect Road.

    Oh Andrew can I send you a link to my blog update as I've lost your e-mail.
    http://www.blogger.com/profile/01908101242799869655

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    1. Hehe Deejohn. The prospects weren't so good for those living on Prospect Road.

      Now haven't you been through the mill! I hope it goes ok for you this month.

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  6. Thanks for the heads up. If I ever go to London, I'll be sure to buy a street directory so that I can find my way around.

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    1. Just get an A-Z River, they're amazing!

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    2. And a tube map too River.

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  7. In Japan most streets don't have names and only postal workers and couriers actually understand addresses. The rest of us have to use landmarks to get our bearings or give directions. That's why there are so many maps around towns.

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    1. Wombat, I suppose that is why it was difficult for the women in Aomori to give you directions to the bar. Must be hard for taxi drivers too.

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  8. I used to live on a Circle.

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    1. Bit unusual Fen, but I know of others here.

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