Tuesday, January 15, 2013

Moored at Station Pier

Voyager of the Sea was in port in early December. While it is not the largest ship in the world, its passenger capacity is the highest. I took tram ride down to the port to have a look at her.


Security is always tight when a cruise ship is visiting.


 This is a pillar kept from when Centenary Bridge was demolished in 1991. Essentially, the bridge was a road flyover and I don't recall any tears being shed when it was demolished.


 As you can see, Voyager of the Seas rather dwarfs the Spirit of Tasmania, a daily ferry to Devonport on the Australian island  state of Tasmania.


Nothing like a good rotunda. I have never seen this one used.


This toilet block harks back to a time when many European immigrants arrived at Station Pier and settled in the local area, hence the Ladies/Donne/Rynaikia sign.


A little whimsy.


View of the boats as I walked along the street towards the shops.


The home of Circus Oz, a performing circus without animals.


Morley's Coal Depot building. I wonder what those who used to hump sacks of coal around and ended up with ruined backs would think of a gym taking over.


This would be an old post office, a proper post office, staffed by dour and unfriendly staff. While post offices in normal street shops may be regretted, I don't miss the staff of years ago.


It seems little effort has been put into keeping the Bay Street streetscape. I blame VCAT, of course. How did anyone think this modern building would look right.


I was a bit mystified about this church tower. I looks old but also new. A little research tells me that, if I have the right one, it was illegally demolished by a developer and he was ordered to re-erect it.



I wandered up Bay Street to Liardet Street and caught the 606 bus to St Kilda. I remember the council sending us a survey some years ago regarding an improvement to the 606. It was along the lines of if the service was improved, would we use the bus. It was nonsense for us as the bus runs no where near where we live, however, I have now used the bus once and from memory it only used to run in the morning and evening peaks. It is now a forty minute interval weekday service. Of course a tram along the sea front, ala Black Pool, would be much preferable and very popular.

18 comments:

  1. In my neck of the woods the post office staff are still dour and unfriendly but now you can add arrogant into the mix as well, so nothing has really changed at all.

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    1. Really Windsmoke! That is disappointing. I find it is variable, but better than it used to be.

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  2. That modern building will eventually fit in perfectly when all those lovely cottages are redeveloped into similar monstrosities.

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    1. Victor, you don't think they have a plan do you? A plan for more developments?

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    2. Developments spread like triffids, Andrew, fertilised by spineless and/or greedy politicians.

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    3. Victor, it is the way I see it.

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  3. The sky looks wonderful. I hope the weather isn't too hot!

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    1. Michael, the sky does look nice in the photos. I can't remember the weather, but I can assure you if it was hot that day, I would not have been there.

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  4. Victor said it!
    Our Post Office staff are friendly enough, but very slow.
    Was the cruise liner open for people to have a look-see?

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    1. No River. People are banned from being on Station Pier unless they are workers or passengers. There is an occasional exception for Navy ships.

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  5. Hello Andrew:
    How we appal these large cruise ships and all that they have come to represent. Not least, of course, for the way in which, as here, they completely dominate the surrounding landscape and dwarf everything in sight.

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    1. JayLa, while our visiting ships are quite contained, I agree with you about what cruise ships have come to represent. They have been particularly ugly in Australia.

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  6. Thanks for the stroll, it was most enjoyable.

    A tram sounds like a great idea.

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    1. FC, a beach side tram would be so successful, yet, there is no will to build the line.

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  7. My favourite way of travelling and visiting port cities is via cruise liners. It is the most restful and attractive way to travel, including undoubtedly Voyager of the Sea.

    But did you see the long analysis of the Costa Concordia disaster on tv last night. That the Italian cruise ship sunk was a terrible accident; that they didn't get all the passengers and crew into life boats was a worse cockup.

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    1. Hels, I will wear that ships can be good for visiting port cities. I have not done a cruise, so I can't really comment.

      Yes, saw about the Concordia. Bad business and I see no reason why the tragedy blame should not be laid at the feet of the captain.

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  8. That modern building on/near Bay Street was meant to resemble an ocean liner, my two gay boys (who live a block away)tell me. Not sure if it was successful or not.....

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  9. Kath, it looks like an architectural abortion to me and nothing like a ship. You know some homosexuals in the area? I thought the area was a bastion of rugged footballers. Were you their fag hag?

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Whenever I wish I was young again, I am sobered by memories of algebra.