Sunday, December 16, 2012

A South Yarra Stroll Pt 1

Walk with me down Toorak Road to Chapel Street. We will take in some modern and some old. The Fawkner Club Hotel had an infamous beer garden. I don't know why it was infamous. We did have a drink there once many years ago. It is upmarket and quiet now, perhaps unlike it was in the past.

Apartment towers built on land exercised from Fawkner Park. Before you say what a crime, it was back in the 19th century; still a crime, but there is no one around to blame.

I was concerned that Fawkner Park was going to be Australianised, with native plantings. Fortunately not, but there are some Australian specimen plants, such as the eucalypt behind the palm. It is a glorious park and up there with Melbourne's best.

My kind of garden, a good structure, but a little overgrown.

As an arty shot, this is a fail, but aren't the roses pretty.

Almost at the corner of Park Street and Toorak Road West is this apartment building, clearly visible from the Highrise. I have a feeling it is empty and undergoing renovations. By the large exterior pipes that have appeared, it looks like it is getting an upgrade to its fire system. Sprinklers would have been useful when it was bombed in the 1980s.
Oh, Art Deco. I like.

On the corner of Marne Street is Simonds Hall, a conference centre, known years ago as Goodrest when it was South Melbourne builder's private residence. His son designed the house. I find that surprising as builders and architects usually hate each other.

Thimply thunning darling. I then passed the infamous Walsh Street. You can see a photo or two of the memorial rose garden at Prahran Police Station here.

Once you start noticing Art Deco, you start seeing it everywhere.

The steeple of Christ Church a the corner of Punt Road can be seen from the Highrise. It looks nice at night when illuminated.


But oh how Toorak Road suffers from congested traffic, day and night. I expect the State Government has declared it to be an area for population growth. It already has a very high population density. It does not need more people. More on that in the next post when we see where the growing population live.

14 comments:

  1. Thanks for the stroll round memory lane in my old neighbourhood. That Christ Church spire is full of bird*sht and pigeon nests and has ricketty timber stairs that a teacher actually took the second grade up, when my daughter was there in 1980.
    Three children were fatally hit by a car when they rushed from the school to the tram stop on that corner.
    Art Deco, Style Moderne, always classy and the bathrooms are often a highlight with great tiling and coving on terrazzo floors.
    Wishing you many more pleasant strolls.

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    1. I do love a floor of terrazzo Ann. I expect when the spire was restored in the late nineties or early noughties, it was cleaned up internally. Very interesting.

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  2. Anonymous11:43 am

    Ha Ann, you took the words right out of my mouth - I was planning to begin with the very same sentence! But thank you Andrew, it was nice to see the places of my childhood.

    You may be surprised to learn that I was briefly a member of the choir at Christ Church. I liked singing but my atheism caused problems... Actually that church featured heavily in my childhood as my Brownie and Girl Guide troops met in the church hall every week.

    I think we should go for a stroll around the old neighbourhood in Feb. V.

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    1. We shall V. Did you change the words of the hymns to something more modern and meaningful?

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  3. My kind of garden, as well. If Victorian terraces came straight to the street line and had no outer layer of beautiful garden and wrought iron fences, they would be very bland indeed. I don't mind a little overgrown; the lusher the better.

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    1. Hels, in certain areas they do come to the footpath, with only a verandah in between, but of course they are single storey and single fronted.

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  4. LOVE the Art Deco! But what has housing 'planning' to do with the number of people vs infrastructure requirements? My cynical self thinks it owes more to economics and business interests ... but I'd be glad to be proven wrong!

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    1. Red, the evidence is there to prove you are right.

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  5. I love all the balconies, I can imagine sitting out in the sun with coffee and a good book.
    I'm glad Fawkner Park isn't being "naturalised" with native plants too much. The trouble with native vegetation is most of it is grasses and they just look like overgrown weeds, not to mention they are often prickly.

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    1. River, while I am all for regeneration of native species, they need to be in appropriate areas, not inner city parks.

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  6. As you know, I live in this vicinity, but I had never heard about this bomb blast - or the other on Carline Street you mention in your linked post. I wasn't living in Melbourne at the time I was still in high school in the country in the 80s), but I knew nearby Walsh Street was the scene of the Walsh Street police murders. It surprises me I hadn't heard about something as rare as bombs going off in Melbourne until just now!

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    1. I wish my memory of the time was better Jayne. Toorak Road was closed for one day, I think, and I think the Toorak tram did not run for three days after the Park Street bomb. I don't know why there were so many bombs in the eighties. Odd.

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  7. All the roads round here are horrid during the day atm. I can't wait for everyone to go on bloody holidays.

    Great pics.

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    1. Just more horrid than usual Fen.

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