Sunday, November 11, 2012

Doing a Hawkey

In February 1983 Bob Hawke became leader of the Labor Party, overthrowing the then opposition leader Bill Hayden. That evening Hawke appeared on ABC TV's Nationwide and in a classic tv moment, interviewer, the late Richard Carlton, asked Hawke if he had blood on his hands.



Meanwhile, in a moment of great synchronicity, the very same day, Prime Minister Malcolm Fraser, oblivious to the change of Labor Party leadership, visited Government House,Yarralumla in Canberra, sought and was granted leave from the Governor General to call a Federal Election.

Hawke and the Labor Party went on to win the election in a landslide and he became Australia's most popular Prime Minister ever.

Sorry, was it the price of fish you were asking about?

Well, with the nasty opposition leader Abbott's personal poll rating so low, one can't help but think a certain member of parliament from Sydney's salubrious eastern  suburbs might just "do a Hawkey" come close to election time.

The only reason I am not actually forecasting this, is that issues between the Liberal Party and the Honourable Member have not been resolved. But if the timing was spot on the mark, I would forecast that it would be a very comfortable win for the Liberal Party.


17 comments:

  1. Colin7:23 am

    At yes I remember that "INTERVIEW"!!!
    Regarding the Hon. Member from Sydney's Eastern suburbs, you just may be spot on.
    A really welcome return and then some others from another party do be a "second Brutus", and recall a certain Hon. Member from an equally "salubrious eastern suburb" here in Brisbane. OMG - think of all that blood!! ha ha. Would make what happened on the original "Ides of March". look like a bush picnic.

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    1. Second Brutus Colin! Very clever.

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  2. He is my local Member of Parliament Andrew but I am doubtful he will return to the leadership. The far right seems to have sway in the Liberals and to them Mr Turnbull must seem like a (dirty word!) socialist.

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    1. Of course Victor. You too are from Sydney's salubrious eastern suburbs :-P. What you suggest is what I alluded to. He is certainly electable, but it depends if the party can shift a bit. If nothing else, I think he would be a strong leader and he does have the gift of gab.

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  3. When is the next election?

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    1. Colin2:12 pm

      River:
      Generally at the "whim" of the current PM who may sniff victory.
      Not at all like the US which has them on a set date every 4 years, some states here, not sure which ones have followed the lead of the USA. That is one good thing about the US elections, the people know when it is coming - always November and hopefully doesn't clash with "Our National Day - the Melbourne Cup".
      So accordingly the next one here is due -"The election must be held by 30 November 2013".
      The quicker a Federal government here follows the lead of the USA on this one, the better. Stops the "current PM's whims and sniffs".
      We can but live in hope - see where our taxpaying money goes! Elections!!!

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    2. River, as Colin eventually said!, late next year is likely. Victoria has fixed four year terms.

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    3. Colin6:56 pm

      Well that accounts for one State with fixed 4 year dates. Anyone know any other state with this sensible position? I think it may be Western Australia.

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    4. I think you are right Colin.

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  4. I reckon the Liberals haven't got a hope of winning the next election with Mr Rabbit at the helm. In answer to your question a couple of posts back about asbestos. In some cases because of the very high costs of removal and disposal of asbestos its cheaper to demolish the building and start from scratch.

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    1. But Windsmoke, they must have to remove the asbestos anyway. Re Mr Rabbit, always remember governments lose elections, rather than oppositions winning them.

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  5. A very comfortable win for the Liberal Party? Not necessarily. Like with Mitt Romney, I suspect that only rusted on Liberal voters, who are women, would support Abbott. My guess is that most women in his electorate would avoid him like the plague.

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    1. Hels, I meant if Turnbull was at the helm. The Abbott is unelectable and should he win, it would be very much a case of Labor losing office, rather than him winning.

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  6. Bring on Malcom if we must have a conservative government.

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  7. Nicely summed up Diane.

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  8. An interesting idea and an attractive one, Andrew.

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    1. Certainly preferable to the alternative.

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Whenever I wish I was young again, I am sobered by memories of algebra.