Saturday, July 07, 2012

Changing Teams

I was thinking of changing football teams from ??? to North Melbourne.


The guy is Andrew Swallow and the absolutely filthy R immediately asked when I mentioned him,
'And does he?'. (you may have to think about that)
'Not a chance, he is married', I replied.
More mirth.


But now I am not so sure. Maybe Essendon might be a better choice. You should have seen Dyson Heppell tonight on the tv. He was wearing a slinky form fitting grey football top and as for his shorts, to misquote Patsy, 'buns so tight, they would bounce off the wall'.

I will ask the Essendon supporting Bone Doctor about the Essendon Football Club. She will answer with, 'Ok, who is he?'

16 comments:

  1. I don't think you can change the team you barrack for; I believe it is against the law, FOR ANY REASON.

    I have barracked for Melbourne since the early 1950s and have had years of thinking about changing. But what can you do?

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  2. Ah Hels. The posh club. What a shame they are doing so badly. Snigger. (if you don't have a childhood allegiance, then you can change)

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  3. Nice lean figure on the Essendon guy. Better team colours too. When we lived in Vic. we barracked for Richmond.

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  4. Anonymous2:15 pm

    Carn the Tigers!!!! :) V.

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  5. Mr Swallow looks a tad like an orange neanderthal to me, Andrew dearest.

    I'm with River - the leaner, faster guy in Essendon for me.

    GO CROWS!

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  6. River, it just occurred to me that most Richmond supporters of the old days would have been catholic. The socio economic divide of the footy teams back then is very interesting.

    Be away with ya young V.

    Kath, spray on tan you reckon? I find the thought of neanderthal quite appealing. Dyson is far too young for you think about. Um, me too I guess. But then as he is old enough to wax his legs...

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  7. Yes there was a divide between protestants and catholics in the old days, but mainly in politics and in jobs like the police where being catholic was a bar to promotion, but saying it happened in football is luducrous. Where do you get that from? Football was a working class sport up until the 1980s when corporate promotion of it began to attract women and middle-income generally. That's how it became the wowser parasol thing it is today with star players suspended for off-field behaviour. How ridiculous. In the 1970s Richmond's Bruce Tempany woke up beside a railway line one Saturday morning after a night on the booze and went on to play that afternoon and everyone laughed about it.
    If any team was ever catholic it's Carlton and it's always appeared to be that way, but there was never a socio-economic divide. Good heavens, I've followed Richmond most of my life. The game itself is a religion. There's never been room in it for any other.

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  8. RH, there was certainly a socio economic divide between teams and their supporters. Surely Richmond was Mannix territory.

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  9. If any club was Mannix it would be Collingwood; John Wren was its number one supporter and a close friend of Mannix.
    I'm just astonished that you find socio-economic difference between teams and their supporters, How? Why do you say this?

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  10. Wren was passionate about Collingwood, he was known to hand players a quid each after a good win. There was also the custom around the streets of "showing John Wren the rent book", he'd look at the arrears and might hand you a fiver.
    My early memory of football is garbadine overcoats and gladstone bags full of beer bottles. It was dead-set working class, never changed much until recent times; most supporters had left school at fifteen to start menial jobs.

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  11. Really, I'm astounded you'd make such a baseless and absurd claim.

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  12. I'm an Essendon girl, don't like Heppel's hair. Can't say I've noticed his body either. Hmmmm.

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  13. RH, so Richmond was proddy then?

    Fen, his hair is very versatile. I'm sure you like versatile.

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  14. I guess it was how it's always been: a mixture of catholics, protestants, jews. A man's religion has never been important to me. Bachar Houli is a devout Muslim and I love his game.

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  15. RH, as I am prone to do, I made assumptions.

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  16. Not prone. I wouldn't say that at all.

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