Friday, April 06, 2012

Warm buns

Kath in Geneva is always a good read and I am making reference to this post where she talks about bread among other things.

Here are some easter buns or hot cross buns if you like. They came from a chain bakery who's name starts with B and it is not Brumbys. The buns are very nice, except they now package them into packs of eight, rather than the traditional six. Forcibly upsized again. We bought these last Saturday and today, Thursday, they are still deliciously fresh.

But should they be? Have you all seen photos of the the McDonalds hamburger that was kept at room temperature for years and it never decayed?

I fear our buns might be the same.



Here is a relevant snip from Kath's piece. It is rather concerning really. Btw, if baguettes in France are anything like baguettes in its old colony Vietnam, then they are superb.


Long, thin baguettes comprise 99% of all bread sold and consumed in this part of the world. Crusty, fresh and flavoursome, it is designed to be bought and devoured on the same day. No preservatives are added, so twenty fours later your forgotten Pain Genovese would function better as a sturdy fence post than a breakfast option.

We often partake of fine coffee at Depot de Pain at the Blackman Hotel. At times we add a muffin on a plate to our cup of coffee. I was initially surprised that Depot de Pain was not an S & M sex on premises venue. From Kath I learnt the true meaning of pain. Ohhh lordy, that sounds bad.

Enjoy your easter time, with or without buns. It is a time to celebrate the death and the rising of christ, or dis christianity and praise allah, or work and earn penalty rates or just some time to catch up with friends or family.  I happily celebrate easter, in a non religious but cultural manner.

16 comments:

  1. Reading this as I eat my my multigrain toast from that well known Aussie bakery.....Coles.

    :-)

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  2. Happy Easter to you and R even though it will be a bit noisey with the tram works going on :-).

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  3. Some traditional bread recipes include oil to stop the product from drying out too quickly, which means to say it would be edible for two or three days. Heaven knows what's in some of the stuff we buy now.
    I think I heard somewhere that toast was invented by the English as a way to use up dried bread. Now some buns or breads have so much of something in them that they are made well in advance and will stay soggy forever, so even toasting won't dry out their gizzards enough to make them edible. Yechh.

    As for McDs, a chap I know thought he would give his kids a treat one day by letting them eat "out", though insisted they get the fruit portion of sliced apple. A piece of apple dropped onto the footpath where, one week later, it was still as white as snow. No more junk for his kids. Do these preservatives only preserve the food, or do the benefits pass on to the consumers?

    Hope You, R, and all of your visitors have a happy and safe time over the holiday season!

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  4. We lived next to a baker once and he told Don that if people had any idea what they do to bread these days - they would be really shocked. Do you remember when the loaf bought Monday was toast on Thursday - not any more

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  5. Hello Andrew:
    Alarming thoughts about the keeping quality of certain breads and buns. What, we ask, is in them? Better not to know!!

    We shall hope to have some Hot X Buns this Easter although they are not really traditional here.

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  6. As do I Victor. But in my old age it might be a daily visit to a proper bakery for a baguette.

    Windsmoke, thanks. It has been a rather interesting day here and the camera has been busy.

    FC, if I make bread, I add a little oil. Bread has gone the way of tomatoes and apples. That is altered for the benefit of the middle men and not the consumer. As for the the apple, the weather was cool and the apple very fresh?

    MC, I hope you don't mean what bakers do to bread in a Portnoy's Complaint manner. Our bread never lasted that long. We used to pretty well get through a loaf a day.

    JayLa, ignorance may possibly be bliss. Have you ordered buns to be sent from the UK?

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  7. As do I Victor. But in my old age it might be a daily visit to a proper bakery for a baguette.

    Windsmoke, thanks. It has been a rather interesting day here and the camera has been busy.

    FC, if I make bread, I add a little oil. Bread has gone the way of tomatoes and apples. That is altered for the benefit of the middle men and not the consumer. As for the the apple, the weather was cool and the apple very fresh?

    MC, I hope you don't mean what bakers do to bread in a Portnoy's Complaint manner. Our bread never lasted that long. We used to pretty well get through a loaf a day.

    JayLa, ignorance may possibly be bliss. Have you ordered buns to be sent from the UK?

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  8. I don't like hot cross buns, to me they're indigestible, sitting in my stomach like a lead weight.
    I'm surprised that your buns from B....are still fresh, they're reputed to not use any preservatives.
    I'd love to eat fresh baguettes daily, but they're crusty so hard on my teeth. Maybe once this round of dental repairs is done, I'll give the baguettes another try.

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  9. over here they make choc chip hot cross buns!!!

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  10. River, they normally give me shocking indigestion, but not this time. I can say it in comments, Bakers Delight. A baguette for breakfast is not a healthy option, but very nice.

    IWBG, yes, have them here.

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  11. Anonymous7:13 pm

    I had a hot x bun for breakfast; it was delicious! Mum sent over a pack of six and two got mouldy on the way over, so I guess they weren't smothered in preservatives, which is a good thing.

    My last co-workers gave me a bread machine as a farewell/housewarming gift. I baked a loaf today and it was wonderful. I could easily eat the whole thing but I'll be good! Happy Easter. V.

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  12. That was nice of your mum V. Home baked bread is delicious. I assume you used a packet mix.

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  13. Anonymous11:24 pm

    Flour, dried yeast, olives and water. It was really good! V.

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  14. Won't keep then V. Even the mixes don't keep. Eat it all up. Must be time for your supper.

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  15. I agree..baguettes in Vietnam are to die for. And in Laos. We have given up superkarket bread these days and are relying on the trusty breadmaker for our loaf.

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  16. Christine, makes me want to go back to Vietnam to get some. We use our breadmaker occasionally as if I eat too much, I get a rash.

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