Monday, February 06, 2012

Rumpole and the Vim

You older readers of mine disappointed me. Don't you remember Horace Rumpole responding il sotto to Hilda when she complained about not having enough money? I am guessing but something like 'the money all gets spent on Vim on the High Street.'

Ever since, R and I have used Vim, as Horace did, as a collective noun for household cleaners. Eg: Shopping shouldn't cost too much this week. We don't need any Vim.

Nevertheless, although no one got the Rumpole reference, your responses were interesting.

5 comments:

  1. Are you referring to the TV show Rumpole of the Bailey? Or whatever it's called. That would explain why I didn't get the reference. I've never watched that show. Ever.

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  2. Noooow I get it. Yes, saw a couple of episodes of Rumpole and enjoyed them. No, never watched it enough to get the Vim reference. Wondered why one might be so attached to a brand of product as to blog about it.
    Refrained from commenting as with the exception of spray and wipe for the stove, clean everything other than clothes using only hot water and dishwashing liquid [including shower door and house windows].

    But yes, the episodes I did see were entertaining, and when people adopted the expression "she who must be obeyed" I knew where it had come from.

    Please don't stamp your feet - [pity them wot lives downstairs]. The next time you issue a challenge I'll be up for it. 100%. I'm waiting.

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  3. Watched a couple of episodes of Rumpole of the Bailey but found it boring and way too stuffy. Much prefer Rafferty's Rules i think it was called that :-).

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  4. Horace and Hilda Rumpole were heroes of anyone who didn't enjoy television series about moronic, anorexic, badly spoken, American, angst-ridden 16 year olds who were allowed to drive!!!!! Imagine a country allowing morons behind a wheel!

    Horace and Hilda could put their sentences together beautifully.

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  5. Indeed it was River.

    Yes FruitCake, that expression came from Rumpole. There were some great lines in the show. Is stamp my feet something I should know about? Hold my breath until I go blue in the face?

    Windsmoke, it was a brilliantly clever show.

    Hels, while it was no one thing that made the show brilliant, I think the writing was just so good. It would never have worked without Leo either though.

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