Thursday, February 09, 2012

Clanger #193

You dear reader, can make as many spelling errors or typos as you like. I expect more from professional writers.

It is unlikely that it is a misplaced full stop before the sentence ends as driving fast into the rear of a car would surely break something.

As prosecutor Ray Gibson yesterday told the County Court, Pasznyk, after accelerating to high speed, drove into the rear of Mr McMahon's car without breaking.

14 comments:

  1. I make a lot of typos myself, but never notice them until I publish. Then, of course, they glare at me.

    However, I'm not writing for money. I also expect professionals to not make such obvious goofs as breaking for braking. I can handle one typo or spelling error in a book but if I find another, I have to quit reading the book.

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  2. That is why newspapers, magazines and hopefully blogs have sub editors!

    It is often difficult for writers who aren't familiar with good spelling and grammar to edit their own work.

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  3. Rubye, in a a book, it is pretty unforgivable. I make plenty too I know. Sometimes I go back and fix them if I think it is important. In the Pride March post, I woke this morning just knowing I had spelt Cathy Freeman's name with a K. I had to fix that.

    Hels, I think sub editors are now called Microsoft. I find it hard to proof read my own writing, but I am ok at picking up errors in other people's writing.

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  4. I'll own up to making spelling mistakes and typos but i don't stress out over 'em just fix 'em up when i see 'em :-).

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  5. Windsmoke, if I use the wrong there, I will fix that, but when it is an obvious typo, I don't worry too much.

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  6. It only took me four tries before I saw what the problem was.

    It's very hard to spot errors if I know what is supposed to be on a page. Most of my typos are probably the result of laziness or haste [or both], but it makes me feel better to simply blame that wretched autocorrect function.

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  7. FruitCake, goes for many of us I think. But you do pretty well.

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  8. The Age is regularly full of mistakes and fails, it's quite frustrating. It seems like no one proofs anything before publishing online these days.

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  9. Whatever happened to proof readers?

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  10. River and Fen, I don't believe they have proof readers anymore. The writer of the piece is responsible.

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  11. And it is a tragic story indeed, having followed the link. Much was broken in that incident, in fact. It is a poor thing indeed that the proof readers did not proof read, even if it was the writer him/herself.

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  12. Christine, I did not read the details. I have heard it all before. I picked up the essence. I think that the people who write this stuff are very young and under incredible pressure to churn out the writing, they just don't have time to check, and they are not of an age that they can auto get it right. Ok, is a damnation of our education system, but I don't blame the writer too much. I'd pay a bit extra for my copy of The Age if they employed someone to get such basics right.

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  13. Hahahaha! I mourn the loss of the editors/proofreaders that used to pick such things up. Another victim to economising, and another reason (along with texting and twitter) that none of our country's youth can spell ...

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  14. It is economising by the media Red. Thunder on as we may do, I don't think many young people care much.

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