Monday, December 19, 2011

Chewing the leg

It stretched to two meals, one sandwich and a gnaw on the bone. I love a leg of lamb and although expensive, if you can do the above, it does bring the cost down. As you can see, there is not much left for a pooch. Can you guess what the skewer is for?

16 comments:

  1. Hello Andrew:
    A leg of lamb - absolutely delicious and well worth the expense.

    We have no idea about the skewer.

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  2. The skewer is for digging the marrow from the bone of course. my dad used to say that was the best part, while I tried not to either watch or vomit.

    I don't like lamb.

    I have stretched a beef roast to several meals and sandwiches though. Chicken too.

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  3. JayLa. The nicest lamb I have ever eaten were quite expensive English lamb chops. They were to die for. The skewer is explained below.

    Spot on about the skewer River. Not liking lamb is perhaps from your German roots? I am not keen on roast beef. I find it coarse.

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  4. We got all mushy and oohed and aahed over the black faced lambs in Scotland - then found the menu at our hotel had "Black-faced-lamb" something or other. I'd rather eat lamb than any other meat, but not that night.
    As always, only after coming home did we "see" the black faced lambs in Aussie paddocks.

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  5. Love gnawing on bones. I masticated two (!!) turkey carcasses at a Christmas dinner recently.

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  6. That's what you call value for money - My Father used the end of a teaspoon to extract every last morsel of marrow!

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  7. So FruitCake, we should buy some black faced lamb meat. I'm in.

    AdRad, you should probably keep your mastication experiences to yourself. Send me an email if you really want to tell me about your mastication experiences.

    Dianne, I have just realised that the marrow hole is smaller. The end of a teaspoon would not fit in now, but it used to.

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  8. I can't get over how the price of lamb has skyrocketed.However if it is good for a few meals it makes it worth while. The skewer is to dig out the marrow...yuk.

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  9. Diane, seems none of my readers are marrow diggers. Quite disgusting, but oh so delicious. The price of lamb must crash soon. Or will ColWool hold the price up high, even though sheep are now quite plentiful and well grazed.

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  10. Michael1:08 am

    Well the skewer is for the marrows. There's indian mutton dish called Tulang which is essentially a bone marrow dish. You get huge bones with large marrow holes to extract it by sheer sucking. (seriously)

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  11. Michael, if no skewer is available, I have sucked out the marrow. Not sure that I would want a whole dish of it though.

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  12. mmmm yummy lamb. Skewers are for stabbing things.

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  13. You're right about the German roots. They don't eat much lamb over there, It's all pork; chops, roasts, schnitzels...when my mum went back to visit in 1970, she went shopping and bought a leg of lamb to cook dinner for her parents, and they were shocked. Who is going to eat all that? is what they asked her.
    You're also right about the marrow hole. It's smaller because the lambs are smaller. When I was a child, lamb was almost at the hoggett stage before being butchered, now every lamb on the market is baby lamb, smaller and barely old enough to leave its mother, which is one reason I refuse to buy it. Apart from not liking it.

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  14. Fen, with gravy and mint sauce, not the sweet variety though. Skewers are for digging around too.

    River, R and I are often perplexed about how one roasted chicken used to feed eight people. It must have been, as you suggest with lamb, they were much bigger.

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  15. It's easy to make roast chicken feed 8 - the trick is to serve it with 8x the chicken's weight in assorted roast vegetables!

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  16. I am not sure Red. I think the birds were much bigger back in the good old days.

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