Thursday, October 27, 2011

Cold Children

There was recently a piece in one of daily papers about cold children, that is those who are distant, unemotional and unresponsive to others emotions. It went on to say how they can become killers, even at young ages. It made reference to a double murder in Newcastle in England. Hey R, do you remember this back in 1968?

He certainly did. At the age of 10 Mary Bell killed Martin Brown, aged 4 and at 11 she killed Brian Howe, aged 3. Mary lived with her mother on the West Road, and R recalls peering into where the house where they lived after the murders. The second child was killed on wasteland very near where R lived. Mary was convicted of manslaughter due to diminished responsibility at the Newcastle Assizes and she was detained at Her Majesty's Pleasure. She was released in 1980, aged 23, and in 1984 gave birth to her own daughter. In 2003 she won an order for her and her daughter's anonymity for life. Her daughter is seemingly very 'normal'.

Maybe some of you remember the case. I cannot, but I can certainly remember the subsequent murder of James Bulger.

12 comments:

  1. I know someone who is like that. Fortunately he hasn't murdered anyone. He was brought up in a loving environment and his parents are at a loss as to why he is like that. He is very successful in the corporate world though.

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  2. And I thought I had problems. This sort of personality is so intriguing because the most troubled of us seem to have a conscience. Well, I guess not the "most" troubled. I have known a heck of a lot of very neurotic people, but have never known these sorts of folks. But then maybe I have the sense to avoid them at all costs. Intuition can go a long ways to keeping us well.

    Oh, but I just remembered, I have known a lot of people who thrive on true crime stories.

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  3. I've briefly seen some specials aired on the Crime channel on Fugstell about child killers and I can vaguely recall a boy in the 1940s but not this one.
    Yes, the James Bulger case still sends shivers down my spine, particularly seeing as one was recently re-gaoled for reoffending.

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  4. The murder of James Bulger was pure evil no two ways about it :-(.

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  5. AdRad, now why am I not surprised that he is successful in the corporate world.

    Rubye, I don't think people who like crime stories are generally a problem. Some autistic people lack empathy, but this is something else again.

    Wow Jayne, I did not know about the re-offending.

    Windsmoke, evil is the word that was used in the article I read, but then dismissed. But to the lay person, evil seems appropriate.

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  6. Although I was not born until 1971, I do know of this case as we studied it in psychology during my degree at Uni. One could not forget James Bulger either... bless him.
    I think that I know to peg out some children as future "bastard" adults.. because they are bullies right now.

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  7. I remember reading that sociopathic people are quite common. It's just most of them don't end up being serial killers. A lot of them just end up as bullies. And yeah...some of them do well in the corporate world.

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  8. Cazzie, the question that arises for me is that can they be treated at an early age to change their future?

    Dina, I wonder if bullies ever wonder what is thought about them? Probably not.

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  9. There's a movie out now, has Kevin in the title, about such a child. I keep meaning to see it then forget. "We Need to Talk About Kevin" that's it. It's fascinating how we develop at such a young age.

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  10. Fen, the movie may well be why the matter was being written about

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  11. I've just d/led the talking book version that the film is based on. Need to find my ipod now.

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  12. Oh Fen, you so techie.

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Whenever I wish I was young again, I am sobered by memories of algebra.