Thursday, April 14, 2011

Been rainin' a lot

I am no expert at climate change. I focus on weather and climate on a here and now basis.

Given I am not an expert on the above, I must go the experts, the climate and weather scientists among others.

I am quite alarmed by what they saying. Seems like we are altering our climate by our carbon emissions.

Some politicians, newspaper writers and radio and tv broadcasters tell me that man made climate change is nonsense.

Scientists have certainly been wrong about things in the past but if there are so many saying the same thing, wouldn't you believe them?

What astounds me is the arrogance of some media people, politicians and amateurs who think that they have a better understanding of climate change and whether or not it is happening and whether we humans are responsible for it than those who study the science.

To paraphrase the world media baron Rupert Murdoch, we have nothing to lose by taking climate change seriously.

I will just warn politicians and I expect there are many who think like me even in your marginals. The time for politics on the matter has passed. This is serious.

9 comments:

  1. While the deniers keep saying climate has changed in the past, what they don't get is that we are changing it faster than Nature has ever managed. I discount the odd meterorite hitting us.

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  2. I somehow never imagined you would quote Rupert Murdoch other than in jest but then I never imagined Rupert saying something sensible and moral.

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  3. Climate change is a very interesting topic that I believe a lot of people don't quite understand. There is far too much money tied up in the current 'belief's' for there to be any serious debate, and it this, coupled with the screams of 'denier' every time someone disagrees with the 'consensus' view means that most people simply accept the media statements as gospel.

    The current 'consensus' argument is that Carbon Dioxide emissions are the sole cause of climate change, and that if we don't do something, we will, by default, kill the planet. Such an argument is very simplistic and has been shown to not just be incorrect, but deceptive.

    Climate change is happening. It has been happening for ever. There is absolute evidence that at various times in the earths history, oceans have been both higher (at one stage, most of the continent of Australia was under water, this is evidenced by the amount of salt everywhere) and lower (at one stage, you could walk to Tasmania), plus there has been both more and less carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Ice levels have been higher, and lower, and there has both been more and less green vegetation. The planet seems to do just whatever the hell it likes, and we are just along for the ride.

    In other words, Climate change will happen whether there is human existence or not. Things such as solar flares, volcanic eruptions and bush fires contribute to the planets environment just as much as humans. For example, the recent volcanic eruption in Finland emitted something like the equivalent of 30 years of human Carbon Dioxide and other gases into the atmosphere. Also, Humans contribute something in the region of 1% of the total carbon dioxide emissions. Certainly that 1% will impact somewhere in the 'food chain', but saying that we are totally responsible for climate change is stupid.

    Personally, I feel that things like deforestation and other environmental disasters (salinity for example) have far more impact on climate change that CO2 emissions. Certainly when it comes to temperature differences. I remember as a young 'un bush walking in Tasmania, and finding it considerably cooler and damper within the bush than on an open paddock. All the clear felling and other such environmental practices have probably had more impact on Australia's environment that people understand or accept.

    Also, I can't help but wonder wether it might simply be part of the earths natural cycle. We love to blame ourselves for things, as well as loving to think we are more important that we are. Might it not be that we are over-assuming our own importance? Also, aren't all the people who claim global warming is caused by human co2 emissions the ones most benefiting from its 'discovery'? You know, all those scientists who would otherwise have to get real jobs?

    I have never disputed that the planets weather is changing, but is it changing as we think? The last couple of ice ages have started with an increase in temperatures, which has led to the melting of ice caps. The higher water level has meant that less land is available to soak up the suns warmth, and as a result, an ice age has resulted. There is also evidence that we might have come off a mini ice age over the last 150 or so years, which could mean that the planet is simply returning to more 'normal' weather patters.

    Either way, we don't know. Ice cores and other such stories contradict each other and simply prove that different parts of the planet experience different weather patters. Might it not be that to prevent an ice age over the next 100 or so years, we might need to pump more co2 into the atmosphere?

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  4. Buggered if I know, I just compost everything, walk everywhere, and plan to head for high ground when the big one hits.

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  5. Good work Jah Teh.

    People never cease to surprise hey Victor.

    Msilsby, I have my own theories about local climate change, such as the disappearance of front and back yards of grass and gardens and large trees in gardens resulting in rain water running off rather than being absorbed by the soil and then expirated. While I appreciate your detailed comment, scientists have studied these matters in great detail. Can I or you argue with them? Of course we can. They are not infallible, but I find it difficult to disagree with them.

    Jayne, is Dunolly high ground?

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  6. Indeed, it is, apparently 203 metres above sea level.
    Although when the Loddon River gets overly full it seems bits of it are somewhere underwater...

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  7. Yes, I heard some warnings earlier this year, but I don't think it came to much there.

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  8. once upon a time way beyond the Blue mountains was the ocean so don't grumble about the tides affecting a water front property in Sydney - it was always thus

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  9. T'was a long time ago though MC.

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