Saturday, January 15, 2011

The Movie Usher

In some way it is good that we no longer have ushers in theatres, as perhaps this cannot happen without ushers.

This is not personal, just something based on what I heard.

Little Jayne to her mum: I don't want to go the pictures with Auntie Nellie. I want to go to the pictures with Auntie Jessie. Auntie Nellie always sits down the back and I can't see very well. Auntie Jessie always sits at the front.

The aunties Nellie and Jessie were sisters. Can I quiz you what I might be on about here?

Obviously by the names we are going back a few years, but certainly within living memory, maybe even mine.

Later edit: How about if I added that the aunt who sat at the back was made to sit at the back.

Later later edit: Clearly I made this too hard. The aunts who were sisters were part aboriginal, one dark and the other pale. The darker one always had to sit at the back of the cinema whereas the pale one could sit at the front, hence Little Jayne preferred to go with the pale skinned aunt. This was post WWII, perhaps even the 1950s.

15 comments:

  1. dear Highriser I am sorry I cannot answer your quiz, I am gobsmacked by the concept of a child having two aunts taking it to the movies frequently enough for it to develop that theory.

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  2. Pretty implausible now Ann. But not really years ago. Local town, close family, all that.

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  3. *NB - Little Jayne bears no resemblance to the blogger of the same pseudonym.
    As you were.

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  4. one was long sighted and the other short sighted?
    I'm just confused, though I do have my glasses on!

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  5. Jayne, there was a reason why I used Jayne.

    Nope Fen. I have added a clue to the post.

    Later edit: How about if I added that the aunt who sat at the back was made to sit at the back.

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  6. Mmm ... ushers used to show you to your seat, right? This presumes that your ticket indicated your seat.

    How can it be, then, that AJ always got a ticket for the back, whereas AN always got a ticket for the front.

    Did an usher have a 'thing' for AJ?

    But but but ... in the days of ushers, there were also ice-cream vendors plying the aisles and then standing down the front al the better to see potential customers. So, maybe this was LJ's true motivation.

    I have no bloody idea, whatsoever, but know that I always sit at the back ...

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  7. I'm assuming either a racial thing or a smoking/non smoking thing?

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  8. Second thoughts (and memories). We used to have front and back stalls downstairs in cinemas the former tickets being cheaper than the latter.

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  9. Actually in Sydney smokers used to be on one side from memory not front or back.

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  10. Clearly I made this too hard. The aunts who were sisters were part aboriginal, one dark and the other pale. The darker one always had to sit at the back of the cinema whereas the pale one could sit at the front, hence Little Jayne preferred to go with the pale skinned aunt. This was post WWII, perhaps even the 1950s.

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  11. Well done Victor. Racial.

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  12. As I said, Little Jayne sure as heck aint moi :P
    Bizarre concepts of segregation only a short time ago in Oz yet are almost completely unknown or realised these days.
    Thank fark.

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  13. It makes me so sad, and I know this also indicates alot of what my Grandma and her family went through all through their lives. Auntie Nellie must have felt helpless at ever having to explain to the child why she had to sit at the back... not by choice.

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  14. Ah ... the usher of the black rod ... ooops ... *slap* Julie ... bad.

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  15. Jayne, people of a certain age probably know about it, but peronalising and how it worked in practice was a good idea I thought.

    Cazzie, the girl was never told why, and she was too young to understand at the time. Only later did she work it out.

    Julie, now I know why the word droll was invented.

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