Wednesday, December 22, 2010

What is it? Solution

I need to add a shrieking sound as used on Stephen Fry's Q & I when someone states an obvious answer and they are wrong. What do you reckon this odd looking thing is?


Solution: While such a device would normally be found in a tram to control power to the motors, in this case in a bank of several, it controlled Sydney's swinging span Pyrmont Bridge. Pyrmont Bridge at Darling Harbour is the worlds oldest swinging bridge, 108 years old, and while Sydney's streets were not yet lit with electricity, Pyrmont Bridge was electrically operated.

10 comments:

  1. Since you are a train/tram maniac / enthousiast, it's the driving and stopping handels of a tram.

    All aboard!!!

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  2. It's a 'Deadman's Handle'.

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  3. Peter, that is where the shrieking noise is played on Fry's Q & I. No, although I suppose you are half right.

    Dead men don't need handles Brian.

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  4. NFI but it looks pretty.

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  5. It looks like something that would nowadays contravene occupational health and safety laws.

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  6. Peter is on the track Jayne.

    AR, only if you were careless when facing away from it.

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  7. Andrew, over here we call them dead men's handles. If the driver collapses the handle automatically swings round and shuts the tram down.

    Unless, of course, it's something completely different.

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  8. it does look similar to the controls of an old elevator (like Georges Of Collins Street used to have)

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  9. Anonymous4:52 pm

    Emergency brake for a tram?

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  10. Sounds dangerous Brian. When the handle swings it could give the driver a whack.

    It does Ann. There is a connection, because the city's lifts used to use dc power like trams.

    Anon, solution is at the bottom of the page.

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