Wednesday, December 29, 2010

Never a right time

I have wanted a new Melways Street Directory for a good while, but the time was never right. I thought I would wait until City Link was complete so that I would have that clearly showing on the edition of Melways. Then I decided to wait for Eastlink to be completed and the alterations on the merge of the Calder and Tullarmarine Freeways. But wait, there are the West Gate Freeway alterations. Eventually you have to bite the bullet, for motorways and toll roads just keep on getting built, so my new street directory does not have Peninsula Link marked as a completed road, but it shown as dotted lines with exits and entrances.

I use Google Maps and Melways online all the time. On my phone I often use Google Maps. However, I still like the hard copy to give a sense of proportion and overview, and the myriad of extra detail. Btw, Melways online has had a makeover and the stupid seven buttons at the top to enlarge or reduce have gone and it now operates with a sliding + or - or with your mouse thumb wheel. So much better and not before time. I am very much enjoying flicking through my new Melways and learning stuffs I never knew.

ABI Brother was taking a look and pointed out on a map to me an oddity. East of Pakenham where the Pakenham Bypass was constructed, a couple of minor roads were terminated where they met the Bypass. One, Ryans Road, had a train level crossing which became redundant when Ryans Road was cut into two. However, the bells and flashing lights still operate as the train passes through, even though there is now nothing to protect and has not been for two years. I'm quoting my brother on this, so I hope he is right.

Later Edit: Timespanner found an online news story about the crossing. You can see it here.

11 comments:

  1. Your brother's right on the button. I found a video here on the mix-up.

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  2. If so many other cities can get these things right, why can't ours?

    I loved the electronic card system in Finland. There were no barriers to get into train stations and no need to touch off...the authories there trusted people to touch on and, if necessary, press the right zone. It was simple and it worked.

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  3. You mean my 1970 Melways may have been slightly superseded?

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  4. Brilliant TS. It is a Channel 7 news story.

    AR, Singapore's seems to work brilliantly.

    Keep it Jayne. For people like us they are invaluable.

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  5. The flashing lights are possibly a warning to unsuspecting hedgehogs.

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  6. In our case Brian, echidnas.

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  7. Soon there will be a new Freeway going right through my mother's house too, so, I would put off buying a Melways for another two years too :(

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  8. I sympathize, Andrew. I've got sat nav in both our cars but the map databases are a few years out of date. The cost of new DVDs? $295 each!

    I'll just have to keep driving through paddocks according to the display when I'm on EastLink.

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  9. Really Cazzie? I hope she is well compensated, assuming she doesn't stay on and wave to the passing traffic.

    I am confused Lad. How do you get the update to your sat nav from a dvd? For that price you can buy new cheap ones. Lol at driving through paddocks.

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  10. The DVD updates the map database, inserting any new roads. Not essential, but handy. If you know where to get cheaper versions, let me know.

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  11. Understand Lad, but how does the info get from the dvd to the sat nav unit?

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